Cake Boss 6/1/09

Decorating By cutthecake Updated 4 Jun 2009 , 12:32am by maralin

cutthecake Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 2:16am
post #1 of 37

Buddy used a steamer on the black fondant to make it shiny....has anyone ever done or seen that before?

36 replies
diane Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 4:11am
post #2 of 37

i've used very hot water and a brush...comes out the same...nice and shiny!! i did this when i wanted my tiles to look wet on my bathtub/duck cake.

caseyhayes Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 4:21am
post #3 of 37

I've used cold water and a brush on my blue fondant to make it look real.

nannie Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 5:22am
post #4 of 37

what was that dessert with the hard boiled egg icon_confused.gif

sometimes he talks so fast, I just don't understand his accent.

SugarFrosted Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 6:06am
post #5 of 37

It's a bread with whole eggs (in the shell) baked into it, an Easter tradition.
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Braided-Easter-Egg-Bread/Detail.aspx
http://www.sicilianculture.com/food/easteregg.htm

nannie Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 1:45pm
post #6 of 37

thank you thumbs_up.gif

I'd never heard of that before and sounded so Intriguing

cylstrial Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 1:56pm
post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

Buddy used a steamer on the black fondant to make it shiny....has anyone ever done or seen that before?




I don't think I noticed that. Which cake did he do that to?

ASimpleBaker Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 2:08pm
post #8 of 37

I have made my MMF shiny by brushing it with vanilla smirnoff and letting it dry..

tamarawagner99 Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 3:43pm
post #9 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarFrosted

It's a bread with whole eggs (in the shell) baked into it, an Easter tradition.
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Braided-Easter-Egg-Bread/Detail.aspx
http://www.sicilianculture.com/food/easteregg.htm




That is too neat! Thanks for sharing Sugarfrosted! I can't wait to try this! icon_smile.gif

PinkZiab Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 3:45pm
post #10 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by nannie

I just don't understand his accent.





What accent? icon_confused.gif lol

<-----Jersey Girl

nannie Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 3:47pm
post #11 of 37

hee hee hee

especially since I'm from Chicago. where "the"
is "duh"

lchris Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 5:21pm
post #12 of 37

We don't have strange accents here in Texas!!! icon_lol.gif

SugarFrosted Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 6:36pm
post #13 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

Buddy used a steamer on the black fondant to make it shiny....has anyone ever done or seen that before?



I don't think I noticed that. Which cake did he do that to?




It was the game system console...he called it a BuddyBox.

Did you know you can watch full episodes of Cake Boss online? Altho this is not the current episode, have a look:
http://tlc.discovery.com/videos/cake-boss-a-bride-a-boat-and-bamboozled-full-episode.html

It's the episode with the 3 black and white cakes for Brides Magazine.

adven68 Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 9:48pm
post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by nannie

what was that dessert with the hard boiled egg icon_confused.gif

sometimes he talks so fast, I just don't understand his accent.




It's also a Greek tradition to make the sweet Easter bread with the eggs...a stone's throw away from Sicily, I guess... icon_smile.gif
when I make them, I use already dyed eggs....they are really beautiful and YUMMY.
Being from Brooklyn...I'm used to the Italian/Jersey accent...luv it when they say "youse"....pronouced "use" LOL

I liked the show...but I have to say that the bunny was a little scary looking. icon_surprised.gif ...but as long as the kids liked it, right? A nice thing to do.

Win Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 9:54pm
post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

Buddy used a steamer on the black fondant to make it shiny....has anyone ever done or seen that before?




I've seen Buddy do it on FNC as well. I have done it with a clothes steamer I bought just for such a purpose. Make sure you stand back so you don't get any drips! I also use the steam method to "set" petal dust on my gumpaste flowers.

cutthecake Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 2:10am
post #16 of 37

The Easter bread with the hard-boiled egg in it is called casatelli, a traditional Italian bread. It is made with a rich eggy dough, and it is delicious. It's not a dessert, but a very sweet bread. We usually eat it for Easter breakfast, then with whatever other meals we have that day. And the next. My mother, and her mother before her (and every other Italian woman I know) made casatelli. It's hard work to knead all the dough, but it's worth it. After you bake it, you spread a powdered sugar glaze on it, then sprinkle with non-pareils.
A few days after Easter, when the bread is getting sort of stale, it's great toasted and buttered. Boy, I wish it was Easter.

tamarawagner99 Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 11:44am
post #17 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

The Easter bread with the hard-boiled egg in it is called casatelli, a traditional Italian bread. It is made with a rich eggy dough, and it is delicious. It's not a dessert, but a very sweet bread. We usually eat it for Easter breakfast, then with whatever other meals we have that day. And the next. My mother, and her mother before her (and every other Italian woman I know) made casatelli. It's hard work to knead all the dough, but it's worth it. After you bake it, you spread a powdered sugar glaze on it, then sprinkle with non-pareils.
A few days after Easter, when the bread is getting sort of stale, it's great toasted and buttered. Boy, I wish it was Easter.




It sounds delicious and I am so intrigued by this!

So, do you actually eat the eggs or do you add them to the Easter egg hunt stash? My husband was a little weirded out by the hard boiled egg in there. And the one recipe link that sugarfrosted gave said the eggs would cook when you baked the bread, but Buddy said his were hardboiled first. How do you do it?

playingwithsugar Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 11:52am
post #18 of 37

We didn't use hard boiled eggs when we made ours years ago. We used raw eggs that cooked inside the shell as the bread baked.

If you used hard-boiled eggs before baking, wouldn't they be like golf balls when you tried to eat them?

Theresa icon_smile.gif

Deb_ Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 11:55am
post #19 of 37

It's also a Portuguese tradition.............I guess since all these Europeon countries are so close it sort of spilled over from one to the next.

My Mom used to make 20lbs of flour (20 loaves) of these for Easter, well actually Good Friday.

She'd mix it up on Wednesday evening let it rise over night, then on Thursday she'd shape all of the loaves add the eggs (she soft boiled them first), let the loaves rise again and Good Friday morning we'd awake to the smell of these sweet breads baking for our breakfast. We ate the eggs with the bread.

I love Buddy's show, his family reminds me of mine when we get together. LOL.........I gotta agree with adven68, the bunny kind of reminded me of a ghost..........I think it was the facial features that made it a little scary. It needed eyelashes and whiskers and a smile maybe.

cylstrial Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 12:02pm
post #20 of 37

Thanks SugarFrosted and Win! I guess I just missed that part. I'm usually cleaning up after my 19 month son, not completely watching everything. Or getting ready for bed on the commercials. So then I miss a minute or so when it's back on. I'll have to pay more attention!

cylstrial Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 12:03pm
post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

Quote:
Originally Posted by nannie

I just don't understand his accent.




What accent? icon_confused.gif lol

<-----Jersey Girl




Ha! To everyone else, he has a heavy accent. The company I used to work for was in NJ, so I'm pretty familiar with it... and I catch everything, but I can still hear that accent! icon_biggrin.gif

tamarawagner99 Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 2:02pm
post #22 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

The Easter bread with the hard-boiled egg in it is called casatelli, a traditional Italian bread. It is made with a rich eggy dough, and it is delicious. It's not a dessert, but a very sweet bread. We usually eat it for Easter breakfast, then with whatever other meals we have that day. And the next. My mother, and her mother before her (and every other Italian woman I know) made casatelli. It's hard work to knead all the dough, but it's worth it. After you bake it, you spread a powdered sugar glaze on it, then sprinkle with non-pareils.
A few days after Easter, when the bread is getting sort of stale, it's great toasted and buttered. Boy, I wish it was Easter.




It sounds delicious and I am so intrigued by this!

So, do you actually eat the eggs or do you add them to the Easter egg hunt stash? My husband was a little weirded out by the hard boiled egg in there. And the one recipe link that sugarfrosted gave said the eggs would cook when you baked the bread, but Buddy said his were hardboiled first. How do you do it?

Deb_ Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 3:58pm
post #23 of 37

My Mom use to soft boil the eggs first and then prick the shell with a pin so they wouldn't explode in the oven.

The reason she pre-cooked them was that you need to allow the loaves to rise again once you shape them, so if the eggs are uncooked there could be an issue with them turning bad on you while they're left out to rise.

The eggs get hard boiled but not like golf balls, they're definitely still edible and we used to fight over them.

My sister tried to make these after my Mom died and she forgot to prick the egg shell.........yup exploded eggs all over the inside of her oven.

We can laugh about it now, but she wasn't happy at the time. icon_biggrin.gif

cutthecake Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 4:47pm
post #24 of 37

We hard-boil the eggs first. Never pricked the shells, and never had problems with explosions. I never "fought" over them because I hate hard-boiled eggs, but some relatives did.
I agree with most of what dkelly said, even though I rarely see
eye-to-eye with Red Sox fans. Many of those western European countries share food traditions.
One of the problems with the old recipes from my grandmothers is that they didn't measure anything. Their bowls and hands were their measuring utensils. And my baking pans are different in sizes than theirs were.
Every Easter, I make the traditional ricotta Easter pies from recipes from both of my grandmothers and my husband's grandmother. (Ricotta, wheat and chocolate ricotta pies.) Every year it's the same thing. ...I wind up with six pies, even though I set out to make three, one of each. It's hard to scale the recipes down when you're using measurements like "fill the big bowl halfway with flour". WHAT big bowl? Who has it now? What relative is hoarding it?
And crack "a dozen or so eggs into a bowl". Is that 11 or 13, Nanny?
Or, how about "Makes enough for my big fluted pie plate and the small glass one." (That's the updated recipe from my mother, who probably couldn't reduce her mother's recipe.)
Needless to say, I use a lot of colorful language when I bake these pies. I set aside one night for baking the @#$%^&* pies, then I have to do the casatelli.
And I've been sworn to secrecy with the recipes, so please don't ask. The only way to get them is to marry into this nutty family.

Deb_ Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 4:57pm
post #25 of 37

LOL!!! Ya gotta love the Sox/Yankee rivalry though don't ya? It's the best there is or ever will be in sports.

I totally understand the old recipe measurement thing. My Mom's recipes included directions like a "handfull" of sugar......who's hand and what size was it?

We wonder why our stuff doesn't taste exactly like hers did. icon_rolleyes.gif

One time we videotaped her making the marinade for Cursela (Portuguese spelling not my strong point), which is basically boneless pork that you marinate for days and then cook slowly in a "special" cast iron pan (which YES I took).

Well, since the wine she used was home made by one of her friend's husbands, we cannot replicate the taste at all. I'm convinced it's the homemade wine because I go to the exact stores to buy all the other spices and ingredients that she did.

Some recipes do go to the grave with our ancestors, I guess!

PinkZiab Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 4:59pm
post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

Every Easter, I make the traditional ricotta Easter pies from recipes from both of my grandmothers and my husband's grandmother. (Ricotta, wheat and chocolate ricotta pies.) Every year it's the same thing. ...I wind up with six pies, even though I set out to make three, one of each. It's hard to scale the recipes down when you're using measurements like "fill the big bowl halfway with flour". WHAT big bowl? Who has it now? What relative is hoarding it?
And crack "a dozen or so eggs into a bowl". Is that 11 or 13, Nanny?
Or, how about "Makes enough for my big fluted pie plate and the small glass one." (That's the updated recipe from my mother, who probably couldn't reduce her mother's recipe.)
Needless to say, I use a lot of colorful language when I bake these pies. I set aside one night for baking the @#$%^&* pies, then I have to do the casatelli.
And I've been sworn to secrecy with the recipes, so please don't ask. The only way to get them is to marry into this nutty family.




I've had the same experience with our easter pies. We make three types: Wheat, Rice, and meat (and the meat is made in both wet, with ricotta, and dry, without), although we finally managed to get it down to a science. But even those make about 6 large pies per batch (but we make them to give away, as well). We make the meat pies on Good Friday, since you're not allowed to eat meat it's supposed to be a exercise in self-discipline (I'm an atheist now, so it doesn't matter to me anymore lol) Funny story: I was really craving the meat variety last fall, so I decided to make it. My Aunt calls and asks what I'm up to, so I said "I'm making pizzagaine." She nearly came through the phone and said "YOU CAN'T--IT'S NOT EASTER!!" And she was dead serious... like I was breaking some law of the universe or something. LOL

Homemade-Goodies Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 5:01pm
post #27 of 37

:'-(
Can't watch TLC online from outside USA....so sad for me!!!!
:'(

Deb_ Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 5:05pm
post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

My Aunt calls and asks what I'm up to, so I said "I'm making pizzagaine." She nearly came through the phone and said "YOU CAN'T--IT'S NOT EASTER!!" And she was dead serious... like I was breaking some law of the universe or something. LOL




LOL!! Why is it that we only make certain foods for certain Holidays and that's it? My family does the same thing.

Even though we all loved those damn breads with the eggs, my Mom only made them at Easter time............we had to wait an entire year to eat them again. No wonder we fought over the eggs! icon_biggrin.gif

I remember when I was first married and turkeys went on sale, so I bought one and made it. My husband was shocked that we were having a turkey dinner and it wasn't even Thanksgiving.

Gotta love weird families!

playingwithsugar Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 5:06pm
post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

LOL!!! Ya gotta love the Sox/Yankee rivalry though don't ya? It's the best there is or ever will be in sports.




My response - Go, Yankees!

My grandmother was one of those Eastern Europeans who was very territorial about her kitchen, and very impatient when it came to teaching, so I never learned any of her recipes. I had to research them on the and then create a flavor combination of my own. A few of my recipes are better than hers, some are similar, but most are just missing that something that I can't identify.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

cutthecake Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 5:20pm
post #30 of 37

Didn't Marie Barone (on Everybody Loves Rymond) deliberately give Deborah a spice bottle with the wrong label on it to mess up Deborah's version of the family recipe? Must be an Italian mother thing! No wonder we can't duplicate the originals!

And DO NOT bake traditional holiday foods any other time of the year. It IS the law. And it really confuses people!

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