Does Color Flow Mix Go Bad?

Decorating By imartsy Updated 2 Jun 2009 , 10:15pm by jer702

imartsy Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 1:17am
post #1 of 9

I have color flow mix - both opened and unopened cans - but I know that it's from YEARS ago..... does it go bad? Should I not use it anymore? This is the first time I've actually thought maybe I could use that color flow technique....

Or does anyone think I can do the same thing with royal icing? And how?

Speaking of going bad - does dried egg white / meringue go bad? Gosh I feel like I should know this stuff.... Any help on products going bad or techniques is greatly appreciated!

8 replies
imartsy Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 2:34am
post #2 of 9

please help...

imartsy Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 11:25am
post #3 of 9

bumping this up this morning in hopes someone has an answer - thanks!

Mme_K Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 11:41am
post #4 of 9

I just checked my meringue powder and color flow mix..... the meringue has an expiry date on the bottom of the tin, but there's no date on the color flow.... you might want to contact the company you purchased it from..... they could help
as far as the color flow technique, I've used royal icing for that, just thinning it down to the right consistency...... some say that it's not quite as shiny, but I think it still looks great!
HTH icon_smile.gif

lorrieg Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 4:02pm
post #5 of 9

Check with Wilton about the color flo. The unopened one t least is probably okay. Remember if you are trying to smell it to see if it's bad, it doesn't smell very nice to start with so you probably shouldn't go with that.

PinkZiab Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 4:05pm
post #6 of 9

I've never used color flow mix, so I can't comment on that (and I make my royal icing with real egg whites, so I'm not much help there either), but you can do floodwork with royal icing. The technique is the same, you just need to get the right consistency for the outlining and flooding. it's basically like decorating a cookie with royal, except you're doing it on paper or acetate.

imartsy Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 9:52pm
post #7 of 9

I'm thinking if I just tell them not to eat it - then the color flow would be safe..... or maybe I'll just make up a batch of royal icing and try that - do the same consistency rules apply? It should be thick for outlines and then it should be thinner for filling - like if you picked up a spoon and let a drop fall it should take 10 seconds for that drop to dissolve?

Thanks!

lorrieg Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 10:08pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by imartsy

I'm thinking if I just tell them not to eat it - then the color flow would be safe..... or maybe I'll just make up a batch of royal icing and try that - do the same consistency rules apply? It should be thick for outlines and then it should be thinner for filling - like if you picked up a spoon and let a drop fall it should take 10 seconds for that drop to dissolve?

Thanks!




If you are in doubt at all (some people will eat anything within sight) use the royal icing. Same rules apply for consistency. thumbs_up.gif

jer702 Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 10:15pm
post #9 of 9

Found this on Wilton's website


Color Flow Decorations/Storage:Color Flow pieces should last indefinitely, if stored properly. A cool, dry cupboard would be a good storage place. Do not put the color flow piece on a refrigerated or frozen cake. If the cake has been refrigerated or frozen, allow it to come to room temperature before placing the color flow decoration on the cake. Allowing the cake to come to room temperature should help prevent the color flow piece from bleeding which is due to moisture. Color flow pieces can be set on sugar cubes to eliminate possible bleeding.

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