Do You Bring An Extra Person Along For Delivering Big Cakes?

Business By Toptier Updated 2 Jun 2009 , 4:42pm by loriemoms

Toptier Posted 31 May 2009 , 5:57pm
post #1 of 27

A question for you pros out there...I generally like to deliver my cakes fully assembled but they obviously get heavy when done this way. Is it bad form to ask someone at the venue to help you carry in a cake or do I need to bring along a second person for delivery? What do you all do in this situation? I know that I could bring a cart but sometimes you have stairs or uneven surfaces to deal with and just have to hand carry.

Another question...does anyone have a rule of thumb about how big a cake is before it requires a second person to help carry it? Say, a 100 serving fondant covered cake, would that require 2 people?

Thanks!

26 replies
Eisskween Posted 31 May 2009 , 6:06pm
post #2 of 27

I always assemble mine on site. Takes a lot of worry and hassle out of the delivery. But that's just me. I am sure some other will give you better answers.

Enjoy your day!icon_biggrin.gif

tarheelgirl Posted 31 May 2009 , 6:14pm
post #3 of 27

I usually take mine assembled and my hubby or a friend comes along to help out.

Rylan Posted 31 May 2009 , 6:29pm
post #4 of 27

It depends on how much you can carry. We all have different strengths. I can sure carry a 50 pound cake but I know my mother can't.

I don't sell cakes but I would suggest you bring an extra person with you if you don't think you can do it by yourself.

Good luck.

icer101 Posted 31 May 2009 , 6:36pm
post #5 of 27

my husband usually helps me out when i make wedding or anniversary cake,etc.. i have asked someone at the site.. but i usually know them.. hth

CakeForte Posted 31 May 2009 , 8:14pm
post #6 of 27

yes i do bring smeone if the cake is over 4 tiers tall.

leah_s Posted 31 May 2009 , 8:27pm
post #7 of 27

DH is always with me. And on the very odd occasion that he can't be there, then yes, I sometimes ask someone at the venue for help. Or I assemble on site.

PieceofCakeAZ Posted 31 May 2009 , 8:46pm
post #8 of 27

The vast majority of our cakes are delivered fully assembled and by 1 person. We have a couple of different rolling carts that we use for delivering big cakes. We have a nice stainless steel NSF kitchen cart but we also use one of these collapsible carts when we are tight on delivery vehicle space:

http://www.globalindustrial.com/gcs/prod/30047519/i/1/productInfo.web?a=30047519&c=912110

It's easy to use, folds relatively flat, and supports 350 lbs. Carts make delivering bigger cakes much easier!

Best of luck!

DianeLM Posted 31 May 2009 , 8:52pm
post #9 of 27

Hubby always delivers with me when he's available. If I need help from someone at the venue, I make those arrangements ahead of time.

DebBTX Posted 31 May 2009 , 10:01pm
post #10 of 27

My husband usually goes with me to deliver any size cake. I appreciate him. If he wasn't available I would need to ask for help.

-Debbie B.

Toptier Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 1:13am
post #11 of 27

Thanks for all your answers, unfortunately DH works Saturdays so I guess I'd have to ask a friend to come along and perhaps split the delivery fee with her...can't wait till my son gets big enough to help mom with delivery, he's 11 and that will be useful in a few years. I could deliver some of my cakes unassembled but it seems that almost all the cakes I have this summer are the type that you can't deliver not assembled...one has a tree branch going up the entire side, for example. I suppose if I get in a real bind I can ask one of the venue staff to help but I don't really want to rely on that you know! I'll call ahead, I am getting to know some of the venue staff around here which is great.

I also like to take pictures of my cakes in a "controlled" environment, which means assembling them completely.

Thanks again all!

Kitagrl Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 1:19am
post #12 of 27

Once in awhile my dh helps but its hard because we have four kids, and everybody AND cake doesn't really fit in the minivan. And its hard to find babysitting. But occasionally we will find a sitter or something. But usually I either send him, or I do it. If its a self contained cake that is very sturdy and not too heavy, he does it. He did a heavy wedding cake for me a few weeks ago but he accidentally stuck his thumb in it REALLY bad and then tried to fix the scrolling for me and that didn't work at all...so he said he's never doing another wedding delivery. haha. So I just do them, try to assemble on site. The seven tier one I just delivered, I brought it in three pieces...I had the borders on and everything, and just lifted each piece with spatula and stacked them. Of course the dummies in the middle section helped.

mombabytiger Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 1:33pm
post #13 of 27

I work at a country club and occasionally someone delivers a cake and asks the kitchen staff to carry it in. Usually this happens when the cake has been made by a non-pro, a MIL or whatever. We happily assist and think nothing of it!

ccr03 Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 3:44pm
post #14 of 27

Depends on the cake. The cascading satellite cake are really big right now around here, so I can deliver those on my own - no problems.

On some of the bigg tiered ones, I've had my dad and/or sis help. (No DH - yet icon_wink.gif My bro has also stepped in to help.

debster Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 3:55pm
post #15 of 27

I always love and extra pair of hands daughter or friend goes with me.

indydebi Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 5:58pm
post #16 of 27

If I can't lift it myself, then I assemble it when I get to the venue.

Except for next week .....

I have a 5 tier fully fondanted cake that will look like her wedding dress (Pray for me folks! icon_surprised.gif ) and hubby is going with me since I obviously can't assemble it there and I cant lift a 5-tier cake myself.

I also have a cart of sorts ... it's a hand truck that I can stand upright (like when you move a refrigerator) or it converts to a flatbed. I keep a piece of plywood in the van and lay it on the cart/flatbed for added surface space.

jammjenks Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 6:07pm
post #17 of 27

If it is too heavy or awkward for me, I'll bring someone to help. Sometimes I just take one of my daughters (ages 5 and 6) to help hold the door.

marmalade1687 Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 7:15pm
post #18 of 27

I deliver most of my cakes fully assembled, by myself - my husband has always needed to be home with our children, but now that they are older, he does other things around the house on weekends!

I do have a question though - I have always been nervous about assembling onsite - I am worried about getting the icing ruined with my fingers when I am placing the tiers. How do you place you tiers on top of each other so that your fingers don't scrape the icing? A previous poster mentioned a spatula. I'm mostly self-taught, but in any courses that I have taken, there has been no mention of this little trick!

cylstrial Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 9:41pm
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

If I can't lift it myself, then I assemble it when I get to the venue.

Except for next week .....

I have a 5 tier fully fondanted cake that will look like her wedding dress (Pray for me folks! icon_surprised.gif ) and hubby is going with me since I obviously can't assemble it there and I cant lift a 5-tier cake myself.




IndyDebi - you don't need our prayers...you are the cake diva!!! But we would be happy to pray for you. icon_biggrin.gif

classiccake Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 12:34am
post #20 of 27

I can lift and move cakes up to 180 servings. Anythong over that I take an employee. I have used both guys and girls....a HS or college student usually. I have a couple of experienced young guys who thinks it is cool to work several hours and get paid to help move 5 - 9 cakes on a Saturday.

I personally wouldn't want to ask a venue employee to move a cake...they are busy and I worry about liability if they would cause a problem.

indydebi Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 12:36am
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by classiccake

I personally wouldn't want to ask a venue employee to move a cake...they are busy and I worry about liability if they would cause a problem.


Ditto. I refuse all offers to help carry cakes ... they are welcome to hold a door or get me a cart to borrow, but that's it.

aligotmatt Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 12:59am
post #22 of 27

I agree with classiccake and debi about helping. cart or door, hit the elevator button, don't touch the cake!!!

I'm pretty strong. I can carry pretty much anything. People (customers) ask me how I deliver my cakes sometimes and who comes along, and I'll say, I'm really strong. And they laugh. But it;s not funny! I AM strong. I workout 5 days a week and can kick some butt, roll out 40 pounds of fondant, and then carry your big cake up a flight of stairs to the table!

havingfun Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 1:17am
post #23 of 27

marmalade 1687 wrote:
"I do have a question though - I have always been nervous about assembling onsite - I am worried about getting the icing ruined with my fingers when I am placing the tiers. How do you place you tiers on top of each other so that your fingers don't scrape the icing? A previous poster mentioned a spatula. I'm mostly self-taught, but in any courses that I have taken, there has been no mention of this little trick!"

I am afraid to transport assembled ( and I also do not have the strenght to carry 40 lbs.), so I assemble on site. Granted I am a very unskilled baker, but I always leave my dowels sticking up about an inch. They are all level, and when I place the above tier on, it just all magically sinks into place. This lets me get my fingers (or hubby's) out of the way without much problem. This works for me.

marmalade1687 Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 12:04pm
post #24 of 27

Ah, thanks Havingfun!! I never thought of that! I'll try that when I'm assembling this week.

I can lift a 3-tier by myself, but I have trouble with the 4 and up tiers. I don't do many of these, but I starting to get more orders for them. That's why I asked about assembling on site. I have assembled two fondant cakes on site with no problems, but I'm still nervous about the buttercream.

I also don't let venue staff touch/lift the cake - they sometimes help by opening doors or getting a cart (I push the cart too), but I do everything else.

leah_s Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 12:25pm
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalade1687

I have always been nervous about assembling onsite - I am worried about getting the icing ruined with my fingers when I am placing the tiers. How do you place you tiers on top of each other so that your fingers don't scrape the icing?




I use SPS, so I can slide, yes slide the tiers into place. And as long as the plates are centered in the cake, the entire cake is centered. Easy.

marmalade1687 Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 12:30pm
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

I use SPS, so I can slide, yes slide the tiers into place. And as long as the plates are centered in the cake, the entire cake is centered. Easy.




Yes, I know... icon_redface.gif I'm in Canada, so SPS is more expensive here. I have been thinking of making the investment though. I have finally found a Canadian supplier for it too, but it's making the financial leap! icon_surprised.gif I just have to get over the ease of SPS VS. cost of SPS!

loriemoms Posted 2 Jun 2009 , 4:42pm
post #27 of 27

I assemble all my three tier and smaller cakes before hand. Even done a couple of four tierd and yes they get heavy. I bring my DH along with me because 1) he is pretty strong and 2) I can open doors for him, get little kids out of the way and stop the MIL's who are there who "want to help".

We have a carlisle folding cart, which will hold about 200 lbs per shelf. Best investment I ever made. It folds very flat, we bungie it flat to the seats of the back of the van, so its out of the way, takes up very little room and is easy to just pop open! Even has locking wheels.

My poor DH had to carry a 4 tier fondant covered cake across a field once for a big outdoor wedding. That was about the hardest one we ever did. Most of the time the cake goes from the back of the van, to the cart, to the table, off the cart. Very little carrying.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%