Buttercream Roses

Decorating By madgeowens Updated 4 Jun 2009 , 3:36am by madgeowens

madgeowens Posted 31 May 2009 , 2:03am
post #1 of 37

I would love to know why sometimes my roses are great and other times crappy......I mean how can you get the correct consistancy consistently? Not sure if I spelled that right but you get the idea. Is there a tip to help me so I don't have to rely on luck. thumbsdown.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbsdown.gifthumbs_up.gif

36 replies
Deb_ Posted 31 May 2009 , 2:07am
post #2 of 37

I hate the buggers...........for over 25 yrs bc roses have been the "thorn" in my baker's butt!!! icon_biggrin.gif

mw902 Posted 31 May 2009 , 2:11am
post #3 of 37

I agree with dkelly, I can not make a rose to save my life! I have watched EVERY you tube I can find and still can't even get one to RESEMBLE a rose! Good luck to you!

tonedna Posted 31 May 2009 , 2:17am
post #4 of 37

It takes practice, but the consistency of your buttercream is very important. That will be the biggest reasons why sometimes they turn out great and sometimes they don't.
Edna icon_smile.gif

madgeowens Posted 31 May 2009 , 2:25am
post #5 of 37

I know its the consistency, but is there a trick to know you are going to get that magic consistency or is it always luck of the humidity in the kitchen? I was hoping someone had a secret.....and why do they sometimes get little broken edges sometimes grrrrr....I love making them, its very soothing to me......except when they are a flop teehee

tonedna Posted 31 May 2009 , 2:45am
post #6 of 37

The best way to go for it, is starting with a stiffer consistency. The broken edges come usually from air bubbles in the icing or the need of high ratio. Using ) transfats helps a lot with this situation.
Edna icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 31 May 2009 , 3:34am
post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

I know its the consistency, but is there a trick to know you are going to get that magic consistency or is it always luck of the humidity in the kitchen?




My trick, that works for me, is to take a little bit of the icing and roll it in a ball between my fingers. If it sticks to me but doesn't come off on my figure it is a good consistency to work with. If it does not feel sticky at all it is too dry and need some extra crisco or piping gel added. If it is really sticky and comes off on my finger it is too soft.

Broken edges can also come from piping too slow/not squeezing the bag hard enough and turning your nail too fast.

madgeowens Posted 31 May 2009 , 3:49am
post #8 of 37

Thanks for the tips, I will certainly try them. More if you have em...

mpetty Posted 31 May 2009 , 11:57am
post #9 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

..the need of high ratio.
Edna icon_smile.gif




I use the Wilton recipe for making roses; would I want to use the same amount of high ratio shortening as the recipe calls for? I've read posts on the forum that recommend using only 3/4 of the amount, when using high ratio. Thanks!

tonedna Posted 31 May 2009 , 6:58pm
post #10 of 37

I have done is with the same ratio and it works great, but I can understand why people add less high ratio..
Edna icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 31 May 2009 , 7:47pm
post #11 of 37

...........The broken edges come usually from air bubbles in the icing or the need of high ratio.........
........Broken edges can also come from piping too slow/not squeezing the bag hard enough and turning your nail too fast......


I respectfully disagree w/Edna on this icon_smile.gif Yes, airbubbles can contribute but......for the most part TxSugar's comment is the true reason.
I am one who *LOVES* roses w/broken edges! I try soooo hard to make mine turn out that way.

Using the same recipe each and every time will help. Make notes....don't rely on your memory when making up the recipe. Note if you use 3 or 5 Tablespoons of liquid or shortening; or 1/4 cup etc until you get the icing the way you want, then w/notes you will know how to make it the next time. This is one way you will find out if humidity is effecting the consistency.

Chippi Posted 31 May 2009 , 8:02pm
post #12 of 37

You should check out Edna's tutorial on making buttercream icing!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?=AuUKaPpHooo&feature=channel_page

After I watched it and tried it my buttercream is smooth as a baby's butt! LOL No air bubbles anywhere! I do believe that air bubbles do cause torn roses. I think this post should call for a stand-off! Who can make the prettiest buttercream rose????? Anyone up for it? lol

Chippi!

PS. I'll do it but mine are not far as pretty as your alls will be. icon_smile.gif

mmdiez10 Posted 31 May 2009 , 8:10pm
post #13 of 37

I agree that making buttercream roses is very relaxing. I have found that using hi ratio shortening makes all buttercream projects easier. Edna: when are you going to do a tutorial on buttercream roses? I would love to see your technique.

tonedna Posted 31 May 2009 , 8:49pm
post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

...........The broken edges come usually from air bubbles in the icing or the need of high ratio.........
........Broken edges can also come from piping too slow/not squeezing the bag hard enough and turning your nail too fast......


I respectfully disagree w/Edna on this icon_smile.gif Yes, airbubbles can contribute but......for the most part TxSugar's comment is the true reason.
I am one who *LOVES* roses w/broken edges! I try soooo hard to make mine turn out that way.

Using the same recipe each and every time will help. Make notes....don't rely on your memory when making up the recipe. Note if you use 3 or 5 Tablespoons of liquid or shortening; or 1/4 cup etc until you get the icing the way you want, then w/notes you will know how to make it the next time. This is one way you will find out if humidity is effecting the consistency.




thumbs_up.gif ...Nothing wrong to have your own opinions.. I always tell people, do what works for you best!..I usually go by my own experience and what I see my students go through. I know my first roses where a mess cause I used to overwhipped my icing. Since I dont have air bubbles in my icing they dont break as they used to be unless the icing is too stiff or I am using crisco. As for me, I love roses with the broken edges too, is a different look..lol..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

Chippi Posted 31 May 2009 , 8:57pm
post #15 of 37

Torn roses remind me, well mine did, of carnations. icon_smile.gif

Yea Edna do you see a buttcream rose tutorial in the magic ball? icon_twisted.gificon_biggrin.gif

tonedna Posted 31 May 2009 , 9:51pm
post #16 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chippi

Torn roses remind me, well mine did, of carnations. icon_smile.gif

Yea Edna do you see a buttcream rose tutorial in the magic ball? icon_twisted.gificon_biggrin.gif




lol...Yeah...I want to find time to do one...
Edna icon_rolleyes.gif

madgeowens Posted 1 Jun 2009 , 3:48am
post #17 of 37

Well if you all love torn edges you will love mine lol......they make me mad

mpetty Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 1:14am
post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

The best way to go for it, is starting with a stiffer consistency. The broken edges come usually from air bubbles in the icing or the need of high ratio. Using ) transfats helps a lot with this situation.
Edna icon_smile.gif




God bless ya' Edna, you were right!!! I just received my first order of hi ratio shortening today and made a batch of bc tonight to see if there was a difference. I could never use stiff consistency with Crisco, and I did use a smaller bag this time because I have such small hands...but holy cow, my second rose looked like a real rose! I'll have to post a picture when I can, but I wanted to drop everything and share that my broke edges are gone! icon_razz.gif [/b]

CakesByLJ Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 1:39am
post #19 of 37

Edna is right; hi ratio shortening makes a difference (w/transfat). I also use butter in my buttercream too. Make sure you use small amounts of icing in the bag (I use the plastic wrap method) so the icing does not break down from the heat of your hand. Use sufficient pressure, and... practice, practice, practice..

LL

madgeowens Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 1:46am
post #20 of 37

If you like the torn look on your roses look at the cupcakes I loaded yesterday......you will love them lol.....grrrrrrrrr

that orange rose is beautiful!!!!!

Chippi Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 3:18am
post #21 of 37

Lovely Roses LJ icon_smile.gif

blondeez Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 3:38am
post #22 of 37

I cant say that I love making roses but I do not mind making them. I do know that I can not make a rose a a nail anymore. I use a sharpened dowell rod.

miss-tiff Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 3:38am
post #23 of 37

CakesByLJ, those roses look wonderful. I have been having a hard time with the consistency of my roses, too. I have just been using Crisco. Where is high-ratio shortening sold?

Texas_Rose Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 3:49am
post #24 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by miss-tiff

CakesByLJ, those roses look wonderful. I have been having a hard time with the consistency of my roses, too. I have just been using Crisco. Where is high-ratio shortening sold?




You can find it at the cake decorating supply shop icon_biggrin.gif

littlecake Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 5:20am
post #25 of 37

do em on the stick, not the nail...it makes all the difference, can i brag? my son is opening a bakery in tennessee, came over to oklahoma for some tips, he picked roses up right off the bat. it was amazing!...he was gonna bake, and let his wife decorate, now it looks like they'll switch.

theres a video on you tube...under buttercream roses, it's the gal making them in purple on a purple cake....that's the method i use.

i love doing roses

CakesByLJ Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 12:56pm
post #26 of 37

Thanks ya'll... I don't think it makes much difference if you make them on sticks or a rose nail. Most important is making sure that you have had proper instruction in the correct way to do them. Otherwise you are just repeating the "incorrect" method over and over, unsuccessfully. Honestly, Wilton's systematic approach to making them works beautifully.
Having been a Wilton instructor for over 12 years, I taught thousands of students to make roses, and had only a handful who could not get it. So, find yourself some hands on instruction.. and get er done.... icon_biggrin.gif

mpetty Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 2:03pm
post #27 of 37

Wow, CakesByLJ, not only are your roses gorgeous, but your leaves are, too. I had to do a double-take to see that they weren't silk. Very nice job. icon_smile.gif

Chippi Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 2:08pm
post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakesByLJ

Edna is right; hi ratio shortening makes a difference (w/transfat). I also use butter in my buttercream too. Make sure you use small amounts of icing in the bag (I use the plastic wrap method) so the icing does not break down from the heat of your hand. Use sufficient pressure, and... practice, practice, practice..




LJ,

What is the plastic wrap method? Is that where you put the icing in saran wrap, clip it and put into your icing bag?

Thanks!
Chippi

mellee Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 2:11pm
post #29 of 37

I don't know how to make roses at all. But I like eating them. Does that count? icon_smile.gif

CakesByLJ Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 2:13pm
post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpetty

Wow, CakesByLJ, not only are your roses gorgeous, but your leaves are, too. I had to do a double-take to see that they weren't silk. Very nice job. icon_smile.gif




thanks mpetty.. icon_biggrin.gif I am as picky about my leaves as my roses... I actually prefer using the tip #67 (that most people hate). It gives that nice vein that looks realistic I think...

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