Decorating By DeniseFL Updated 31 May 2009 , 12:42am by DeniseFL

DeniseFL Posted 29 May 2009 , 4:57pm
post #1 of 7

Hey people..
Please can someone tell me what is that I am doing wrong??
I can't figure out..(talking about the wrinkles at the bottom of the cake and uneven sides)
I've been decoraring cakes for over 2 years and only classes that I took were wilton..
It's not an excuse but This cake was the first after 6 months that I spent recovering from a surgery..
I feel so BAD when my cakes turn out like this that I feel I should stop decorating .. BUT I LOVE IT SO MUCH!

please tell me your oppinion..

Thank you all

6 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 29 May 2009 , 5:04pm
post #2 of 7

Sometimes it helps me to put the cake on a board the same size as the cake itself, and then set it on something smaller than the cake board (for example, put a 10" cake and board on an upside-down 8" pan) so that the fondant will drape past the cake. Then I open out any folds as soon as I see them, but they're usually below the cake anyhow. Smooth it as much as possible, cut off the excess, dampen the edge and fold it under the cake board. Then I put it on a bigger board.

Those puffy sides look like air bubbles. Have you tried popping them?

And to cheer you up...most of us can't get a perfect bottom edge on a fondant cake all of the time. That's why we put ribbons around them or add a ball border, to hide an ugly bottom edge. It's just been done so much that it looks like a style.

chyana66 Posted 29 May 2009 , 5:06pm
post #3 of 7

Hi DeniseFL,

Can you describe what your normal process is for frosting and covering your cakes? Also, what sort of fondant do you use?

artscallion Posted 29 May 2009 , 5:17pm
post #4 of 7

Aside from what looks like an air bubble, I also see symptoms of BLB (between layer bulge.) Do you use a stiff icing dam between each layer to prevent the filling from squeezing out under the fondant?

Are you letting your filled cake settle in the fridge overnight before applying the fondant? This give air and filling problems a way to work themselves out before they're trapped under your fondant.

Texas is right about the bottom edge though. It's difficult at best to get a perfect bottom edge. It's just the nature of trying to fit a 2D sheet over a 3D form. To paraphrase Maurice Chevalier, "Thank heaven for little pearls, for fondant cracks get bigger every day."

DeniseFL Posted 29 May 2009 , 8:18pm
post #5 of 7


What I use is MMF, and under the fondant I use buttercream.. I've tried a regular coat, and also a crumboat...

Texas_Rose Posted 29 May 2009 , 8:30pm
post #6 of 7

That's what I use too, MMF and buttercream (Indydebi's recipe).

I looked at your other photos and your other fondant cakes all look just fine. Maybe this one was just an off day or a bad fondant day? I didn't make any cakes while I was getting over my broken leg and surgery and the first one I did after that didn't come out as perfect as I remembered being able to do icon_biggrin.gif (it's the one with the gun in my photos, notice you can't see the bottom edges in the photo I put up LOL) but everything since then has come out fine.

DeniseFL Posted 31 May 2009 , 12:42am
post #7 of 7

Yes, Texas_Rose... maybe it was a bad fondant day..
made another one this week and came out much

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