Tips On Coloring Chocolate After It Has Hardened?

Decorating By giggysmack Updated 30 May 2009 , 12:37am by SweetMelissa2007

giggysmack Posted 29 May 2009 , 1:12pm
post #1 of 11

Does any one have any tips on how to color chocolate after it has hardened?
Thanks

10 replies
bbmom Posted 29 May 2009 , 1:17pm
post #2 of 11

I'm not sure if I understand the question? Did you melt it, then mold it and now you want to add color? If so you could use food markers or royal icing.

Win Posted 29 May 2009 , 1:28pm
post #3 of 11

Is it still in its clay-like lump? If so, just break off the portion you need to color and knead it in. If you have already molded something, or cut something out, it's a little harder to make the color stick, but you could paint it with a mixture of color and vodka or color and lemon extract.

__Jamie__ Posted 29 May 2009 , 1:43pm
post #4 of 11

I think it was agreed in another post yesterday that you can't paint chocolate. The fat content will cause it to bead up like water on a windshield. Dry powder and dust is probably the safest thing.

andiesweet Posted 29 May 2009 , 1:50pm
post #5 of 11

if you use powders for chocolate you can this it with lemon ( or vodka) and paint right onthe chocolate that way. wilton also makes candy colors, they look just like their gel color for icing. thin it the same way and use that to paint.

PinkZiab Posted 29 May 2009 , 2:11pm
post #6 of 11

You can paint chocolate with colored cocoa butter (which you can tint with either oil-based candy colors or powdered coloring, or you can get pre-colored cocoa butter in a full range of colors from www.chefrubber.com).

Win Posted 29 May 2009 , 6:18pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

I think it was agreed in another post yesterday that you can't paint chocolate. The fat content will cause it to bead up like water on a windshield. Dry powder and dust is probably the safest thing.




Good thing no one told me that before I did it! Must have missed that memo... oh well, just goes to prove what works for one might not work for another. I had no issues with beading. I start with powder coloring, thin it with vodka and paint away! icon_confused.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 29 May 2009 , 6:21pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

I think it was agreed in another post yesterday that you can't paint chocolate. The fat content will cause it to bead up like water on a windshield. Dry powder and dust is probably the safest thing.



Good thing no one told me that before I did it! Must have missed that memo... oh well, just goes to prove what works for one might not work for another. I had no issues with beading. I start with powder coloring, thin it with vodka and paint away! icon_confused.gif




That's good to hear! I wouldn't think it would work, but if it does, great! Do you have a pic, so we can see how it turned out? I am intrigued!

Win Posted 29 May 2009 , 7:04pm
post #9 of 11

I have a pic on my website of a pirate ship done in modeling chocolate and painted over with the technique I described... I never uploaded it here because it was always such a dark picture. It's toward the bottom of the album called: Let Them Eat Cake. It's a version of the Debbie Brown Pirate Ship. The center masts are gumpaste. I covered it in chocolate because it was for a three-year-old who, of course, does not appreciate fondant. icon_lol.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 29 May 2009 , 8:41pm
post #10 of 11

Cool...thanks Win! I would have probably never attempted it thinking about fat repelling water based substances.

SweetMelissa2007 Posted 30 May 2009 , 12:37am
post #11 of 11

I tried to "paint" chocolate seashells last weekend and it beaded up like Jamie said earlier. I ended up having to dry paint with luster dust. Maybe Win you used modeling chocolate and giggysmack and jamie were talking about regular chocolate? Not sure.

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