Prevent Filling From Sinking Into Cake Tiers

Decorating By bethie713 Updated 28 May 2009 , 1:10am by Rylan

bethie713 Posted 27 May 2009 , 3:53am
post #1 of 12

I'm working on my very first wedding cake that will be 3 tiers. The bride wants a white cake with raspberry filling. The wedding is outdoors and the cake will be brought out to the table at 7:00 p.m. Even thought it will be in the evening I'm afraid the humidity will cause the filling to sink into the cake......does anyone know how I can prevent this from happening or at least slow the process? Is there some type of glaze I can put on the cake that will harden or create a wall to prevent the filling from sinking into the cake?

I'm only adding 1/8 to 1/4" of raspberry filling. Thanks for your help!

11 replies
icer101 Posted 27 May 2009 , 3:59am
post #2 of 12

a lot of people put a thin layer of the icing that they use to ice the cake, first. then a thin layer of raspberry filling.. hth

idjitmom Posted 27 May 2009 , 6:55am
post #3 of 12

Disolve unflavored gelatin into the raspberry filling (heat, then mix the gelatin in till dissolved, strain if necessary for lumps), then spread it on your cake. Refrigerate for a few minutes to let the filling firm up, then proceed as normal. No dissolving into the cake, no sliding, no bulging - it works great!!

ayerim979 Posted 27 May 2009 , 7:05am
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by idjitmom

Disolve unflavored gelatin into the raspberry filling (heat, then mix the gelatin in till dissolved, strain if necessary for lumps), then spread it on your cake. Refrigerate for a few minutes to let the filling firm up, then proceed as normal. No dissolving into the cake, no sliding, no bulging - it works great!!




Will the filling be too stiff?

Sounds like a great idea? will one unflavored gelatin pack be enough? Just wondering.

MissRobin Posted 27 May 2009 , 1:44pm
post #5 of 12

There is a great recipe on here for raspberry filling, it does not soak into the cake, I will try and post the link. I use it all the time and it is delicious!http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2503-5-Raspberry-Filling.html, HTH!

MissRobin Posted 27 May 2009 , 1:44pm
post #6 of 12

There is a great recipe on here for raspberry filling, it does not soak into the cake, I will try and post the link. I use it all the time and it is delicious!http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2503-5-Raspberry-Filling.html, HTH!

grama_j Posted 27 May 2009 , 1:49pm
post #7 of 12

I've been putting a thin layer of chocolate ganache on the cake before I put the filling...... can't sink into the cake , and adds another YUMMY demention to the cake........

idjitmom Posted 27 May 2009 , 5:57pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ayerim979

Quote:
Originally Posted by idjitmom

Disolve unflavored gelatin into the raspberry filling (heat, then mix the gelatin in till dissolved, strain if necessary for lumps), then spread it on your cake. Refrigerate for a few minutes to let the filling firm up, then proceed as normal. No dissolving into the cake, no sliding, no bulging - it works great!!



Will the filling be too stiff?

Sounds like a great idea? will one unflavored gelatin pack be enough? Just wondering.




I usually just play it by ear. I use preserves with this, and last time I did it I used 2 (18 oz) jars (strained for the seeds, so I lost some) & one envelope of gelatin. It didn't get quite as 'gel-ly' as I usually use it so I made sure to use a buttercream dam just in case, but it worked just fine. And I've never had it get to hard, though I suppose it could. In that case though, I would think that you would be able to peel it off the cake (lol!) and try again.

The great thing is if you make to much, just refrigerate & warm it up in the microwave to make it spreadable again the next time you need it!

__Jamie__ Posted 27 May 2009 , 6:04pm
post #9 of 12

Ok....don't want to hijack, but I have a similar "potential issue" tomorrow. I am making a super detailed fondant covered cake, with lemon curd filling. I want to keep this as cool as possible, and not have any oozy sogginess either. I know I will need to pop it in the fridge every so often to keep it cool and safe to consume (lemon curd). Will putting it in and out, in and out too many times cause this to break down and turn into much? Should I do the thin layer of BC underneath the lemon curd?

Is there a good recipe anyone would recommend for this? I usually just make standard lemon curd, as until now, have not used this in a carved detailed cake that will be out while I work on it.

indydebi Posted 27 May 2009 , 6:22pm
post #10 of 12

Just how thin is this filling you guys are using that would cause it to soak into the cake? icon_confused.gif Unless it's of water or a thin syrup consistency, it will sit on top of the cake just fine. I use the sleeve fillings .... I cut most of my wedding cakes ... the cakes are made/assembled 24-48 hours in advance of the wedding ... and I've NEVER seen the filling soak into the cake.

I've also cut other people's cakes where they have placed a layer of BC on the cake before adding the filling. In my experience, this causes the cake to be slippery, as the filling doesn't have anything to grab onto and hold itself in place.

The last cake I cut (not mine), when I cut the 2" strip, the top layer started to slide off as a result of the combination of too much filling on top of a thin layer of BC. I HAD to lay the 2" strip on it's side to cut it, before the whole thing fell apart.

This is why I strongly recommend that cake makers cut at least 3-4 of their wedding cakes a year ... so they can see first hand what happens at that point.

__Jamie__ Posted 27 May 2009 , 6:31pm
post #11 of 12

I don't have that problem....so far, but I haven't until now, used it in a cake that I'm going to be doing some serious detail work on, that requires the cake to be out for awhile while I work on the sides of it. Painting, fondant detail, etc. So I just wonder if I will have any issues with not remaining nice and firm and not oozing.

Rylan Posted 28 May 2009 , 1:10am
post #12 of 12

I would personally suggest to sprad a thin layer of buttercream and always use bottom side of the cake as the filling side other than the top of the cake.

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