Cake Dummies

Decorating By rfeagin Updated 30 May 2009 , 1:42am by indydebi

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rfeagin Posted 27 May 2009 , 1:29am
post #1 of 17

Help! My customer wants a fake cake for the bottom tier of her wedding cake. The cake will be in buttercream icing. Where do I start? Can I put BC directly on the styrofoam cake? Can I do the fake cake ahead of time and not have fading or discoloration? What are the potential problems? This will be my first wedding cake for a customer and I want it to look great!

16 replies
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Kitagrl Posted 27 May 2009 , 1:33am
post #2 of 17

I was told to use a thin coating of Crisco on the dummy (smooth on with your hands) and I did this for a cake show and it worked great.

I have a cake to do this weekend with two of the tiers in styrofoam and I'm just going to do it all as if it was real cake (not doing some ahead)...only because I'm afraid that if I do it two seperate times they may look slightly different...you know, you kinda get a momentum going. But yeah, you can do the styrofoam one ahead if you want.

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rfeagin Posted 27 May 2009 , 2:18am
post #3 of 17

OK, thx. If that is all it takes (coating the styrofoam with Crisco), I will try it.

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Karenelli Posted 27 May 2009 , 12:10pm
post #4 of 17

I'm working on a dummy cake at the moment and wondered about the sharp edge with the styrofoam. Do you need to angle the edges of the styrofoam to make it a little rounder before laying the fondant on top?

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annacakes Posted 27 May 2009 , 12:18pm
post #5 of 17

Yes, round out the edges by pushing against a hard surface as you rotate the dummy. Will soften the edges nicely!

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Karenelli Posted 27 May 2009 , 12:26pm
post #6 of 17

Ingenious. How simple, thank you. Do you apply crisco or BC to coat the discs? Have you used RKT to make the layers. The surface is pretty pockmarked with the RKT. What is the best way to fill the little crevices if I go that route. I'm worried that I might not be able to find the large rounds I will need for the bottom layers.

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rfeagin Posted 27 May 2009 , 3:45pm
post #7 of 17

What is RKT? (Sorry, but I'm new at CC lingo).

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Karenelli Posted 28 May 2009 , 11:59am
post #8 of 17

Sorry, RKT is Rice Krispie Treats.

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Donnagardner Posted 28 May 2009 , 12:10pm
post #9 of 17

Go to Dallas Foam Company on the web and they pretty much have any dummy you could want and they are very inexpensive.

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Karenelli Posted 28 May 2009 , 12:20pm
post #10 of 17

Hi Donna,
Could you pm me the message you just sent over. The name of the company was blocked. Maybe it will come through if you pm it to me.
Thanks,
Karen

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mcook1670 Posted 28 May 2009 , 12:33pm
post #11 of 17

you can buy dummies @ taylorfoam dot com, they're one of the cheapest. Just ice the dummy like you would any other cake. To take off the sharp coners you can file them or use sand paper

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indydebi Posted 28 May 2009 , 1:05pm
post #12 of 17

i apply the bc directly to the dummy all the time. easy to do ... easy to clean up.

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Peridot Posted 28 May 2009 , 4:29pm
post #13 of 17

If you want to reuse the dummy are you able to? What do you do - just scrape off the old icing and re-ice? What do you do if you don't want to reuse it for a while? Jsut leave the old icing on it and store in a container? Can the dumies be wiped clean or washed (I knowt hat sounds stupid) - but I was wondering.

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dsilvest Posted 28 May 2009 , 4:36pm
post #14 of 17

Just soak the dummy in hot soapy water and the icing/fondant will begin to disolve. You can scrape carefully with a firm plastic spatula if you want to speed up the process.

All I do for storage is lightly cover it with a plastic bag and store in a cool place.

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indydebi Posted 28 May 2009 , 6:42pm
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peridot

If you want to reuse the dummy are you able to? What do you do - just scrape off the old icing and re-ice? What do you do if you don't want to reuse it for a while? Jsut leave the old icing on it and store in a container? Can the dumies be wiped clean or washed (I knowt hat sounds stupid) - but I was wondering.



Yes to all, except I dont' store mine in a container. I have decorated dummies sitting out that are 2 years old or more.

My BC turns hard as concrete when applied to a dummy. Just run a knife under it and it pops off in nice clean sheets (do it over a trash can).

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Peridot Posted 30 May 2009 , 1:34am
post #16 of 17

Thanks for the response Indydebi & dsilvest. I think I am going to invest in a couple of dummies for a Wilton class. I want to brush up on my piping skills or should say lack of skills and I don't want to be baking any cakes and hauling it to work before I go to class.

Can I ask one more question... how do you secure them to a board and what do you do if you want to stack them?

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indydebi Posted 30 May 2009 , 1:42am
post #17 of 17

I just use a dollop of BC to hold it onto the board. WHen stacked, the icing on top of the tier will hold the upper tier in place just fine. And when I'm doing a dummy, I save icing by not icing the middle of the cake ... I only ice where it's going to show.

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