What Is Simple Syrup?

Baking By d_michelle95 Updated 9 Jun 2009 , 7:23pm by ButtercupMama

d_michelle95 Posted 26 May 2009 , 10:49pm
post #1 of 6

So I have seen it talked baout quite a bit on here and need to know what it is and how do I make it??? Please help, I have a couple cakes to bake and would like to know more about this... TIA!!

5 replies
whisperingmadcow Posted 26 May 2009 , 10:55pm
post #2 of 6

Its a sugar/water mix. You heat it until the sugar desolves into the water, leaving you with a clear syrup. Its used to add moisture to your cakes. When you torte and level your cake, you use a pastry brush to brush it on. Be care not to soak the cake, but bush it lightly on.

Thats about all I know. = )

Redlotusninjagrl Posted 26 May 2009 , 10:57pm
post #3 of 6

It is a mixture of water and sugar that some people brush onto their cakes to make it moist. Some people add flavoring to that to enrich or compliment the cake. You can probably find a recipe on here or google it.

Ninacastro Posted 26 May 2009 , 11:02pm
post #4 of 6

Basic Simple Syrup

To make unflavored simple syrup, combine granulated sugar and water in a saucepan in a 2:1 ratio .

Sample 2:1 Ratio:

* 2lb sugar
* 16 fl oz water

Stir to make sure all the sugar is moistened and not stuck on the bottom. Continue stirring on high heat until the mixture reaches a full boil. Remove from heat; you now have simple syrup.

You can use simple syrup without flavoring to moisten cake layers by using a pastry brush to dab the syrup onto the cut layers before you apply the icing or other toppings

Check out this video on youtube:


d_michelle95 Posted 28 May 2009 , 10:28pm
post #5 of 6

Thank you!!

ButtercupMama Posted 9 Jun 2009 , 7:23pm
post #6 of 6

I don't have answers, but I do have more questions!!
Okay, the epicurean you tube video mentions that a standard simple syrup is a 2:1 ratio, but for cakes a 3:1 ratio.
Which ratio do you all use?
Also, if you add flavorings, do you do so during the heating process, or after?
Lastly, the video says the syrup keeps for up to 3 months; at room temp, or should I refrigerate?

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%