Piping A Music Score???

Decorating By JGMB Updated 3 Jun 2009 , 4:17am by -K8memphis

JGMB Posted 25 May 2009 , 8:13pm
post #1 of 10

Hi Everyone,

I've been given the opportunity to make the retirement cake for our High School's music director. I immediately had a vision in my head ----- Now, if I can just actually do it with frosting!!

I want to make one round 14" cake frosted in white, yellow borders around the top and bottom. On the top, written in black, "Happy Retirement" surrounded by buttercream hornets (the school mascot).

Okay, so far so good. The part that's giving me problems is that I want to make the musical score to the first line of "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" going around the side of the cake. How can I get the lines straight? The notes themselves don't worry me, just the lines. I don't work with fondant, so it's BC or nothing.

Any and all suggestions will be MUCH appreciated!! Thanks in advance.


9 replies
saberger Posted 25 May 2009 , 8:19pm
post #2 of 10

you could use an impression mat or use a ruler to make the indents as a guide.

giraffe11 Posted 25 May 2009 , 8:21pm
post #3 of 10

There is a tip for piping a musical staff. I've seen it, but I don't remember what it's called, darn it. It is one of the larger tips, and basically just has all of the separate holes so that you can pipe like you are piping a regular single line and you are actually piping a whole musical staff of lines. Maybe someone else knows what number this tip is. I almost bought it last time I saw one at the deco shop. Sorry I can't help more.

-K8memphis Posted 25 May 2009 , 8:38pm
post #5 of 10

Yah y'know I use (maybe more than my alloted amount) artistic license. I'd make the music score scallopy--not straight.

I have one of those five line tubes where one squirt gets you five equidistant lines--you'd have to get just the right consistency and then I'd probably slop it down the side of the cake at one point or another.

I think if I was really serious about this I'd make some black fondant spaghetti and use that.

Oooh ooh I wonder how piping gel would do outa that tip???

But no you could do it--practice a bunch on a cake pan and get someone to turn the turntable for you so you don't have to stop. Black is so unforgiving. If you did have to stop you could just put a musical thing there like a stop or a staff or something.

sweetiesbykim Posted 25 May 2009 , 8:45pm
post #6 of 10


I've thought about doing this, too. My mom is a violinist.
My thought was getting a very smooth Ateco turntable to spin the cake around quickly and propping up my hand at 5 different levels -holding a small pin, spinning the cake quickly so it imprints all the way around, then adding another 1/2"-1" book or something under my hand and doing it again until all 5 are lightly marked. Then pipe, if that's your thing, or use thin black licorice. At the joins, just make a piece to separate the measures.

-K8memphis Posted 25 May 2009 , 9:13pm
post #7 of 10

No, piping gel is a dumb idea probably--I mean I'm thinking about how often we'll have one blow out --one air bubble doing fine or even not so fine piping. Multiply that by five--having fun yet?

But yeah a black marker might work great--edible ink--at least no air bubbles.

But I mean it can certainly be piped I'm just majoring on being the shabby part of shabby chic. icon_biggrin.gif

I'd probably just use royal icing and just bit the bullet...several times. icon_biggrin.gif

cakeinthebox4U Posted 25 May 2009 , 9:16pm
post #8 of 10

Lindy Smith's book 'cakes to inspire and desire' has a how to for this exact thing.

JGMB Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 2:53am
post #9 of 10

Well, I did it!! Granted, it's not perfect, but the cake turned out EXACTLY as I'd envisioned it, so I'm pleased. I just hope it tastes okay. It's a carrot cake, which tested done. Then, when I went to torte it, there was a big uncooked spot in the middle. I just scooped it out and kept going. They can't complain -- I made the cake for free! icon_wink.gif

Anyway, I had gone to the Wilton store and checked out tip 134. The holes were way too close together for my liking. I didn't want to trace the lines on with a toothpick because I'd done that with the pink & black cake in my photos. It dragged little bits of icing up, making my icing go wonky.

I decided to cover a ruler with Saran wrap and hold it up to the side of the cake. Then, I made a tiny dot with a toothpick at the intervals I wanted about every 4" around the cake. Next, I took a long strand of dental floss, pulled it taut and used it to mark between the dots. Finally, I piped.

Here's the photo: http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1384032

-K8memphis Posted 3 Jun 2009 , 4:17am
post #10 of 10

You did a great job!

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