Will Frozen Buttercream Flowers Wilt Upon Thawing?

Decorating By rharris524 Updated 26 May 2009 , 10:12pm by angelicconfections

rharris524 Posted 24 May 2009 , 9:28pm
post #1 of 16

I made a ton of buttercream roses for cupcakes that I'm making. I planned to stick them in the freezer until tuesday for storage but now I'm wondering if they will wilt upon thawing. Anyone know the answer?

15 replies
Cakepro Posted 24 May 2009 , 9:38pm
post #2 of 16

Not if you used a stiff-enough icing. Were they droopy or wilting when you made them? If not, they will most likely retain their original shape.

indydebi Posted 24 May 2009 , 9:59pm
post #3 of 16

If you're keeping them in the freezer for a few days, you'll probably be ok. I rarely freeze roses/flowers, because anything that is frozen will thaw when moved to room temperature.

But when I have leftover flowers, I'll throw them in the freezer for days and days and I noticed they will hold up a little longer when removed from a zero temp.

funcakes Posted 25 May 2009 , 3:13am
post #4 of 16

When I first started decorating cakes in the 70s Wilton's book instructions stated that buttercream roses should be placed in the freezer and then placed on the cake while still frozen. That way novice cake decorators had a rather good success rate with them. The roses were piped with thick to medium buttercream and they did not wilt. Now that there are little tools to move buttercream decorations I don't think people freeze them anymore.

angelicconfections Posted 25 May 2009 , 3:43am
post #5 of 16

I do this all the time and never had any problems. As long as the icing was firm enough to hold the rose shape before freezing you shouldn't have any trouble. When I have done wedding cakes with lots of roses I make them ahead of time, freeze them cookie sheets lined with parchment paper and then I stack them in my trusty orange tupperware square container that I inherited from my mom. Once frozen they stack without damage, unless of course I drop the box! It saves a lot of stress to not have to do the roses and the entire cake in the same day.

indydebi Posted 25 May 2009 , 3:50am
post #6 of 16

I prefer to air dry my flowers, though. Air drying removes the moisture (water) from the flower. It's this water/moisture that causes the freeze/thaw reaction. Allowing air drying to remove this moisture also makes the flower much lighter and ergo easier to place on the cake without the excess weight causing it to slide of fall off.

Air dried flowers last forever in a container with NO fear of melthing, thawing, drooping or any other kind of shape change. I can keep them on the counter, saving me valuable freezer space.

angelicconfections Posted 25 May 2009 , 4:14am
post #7 of 16

indydebi, you air dry your bc roses? and store them without freezing? How long to they keep like this? I haven't been brave enough to try this with bc roses, but do with marzipan, royal icing, and fondant roses.

Minstrelmiss Posted 25 May 2009 , 4:20am
post #8 of 16

I have a stash of BC roses for emergencies...as long has my DH hasn't found and eaten them icon_rolleyes.gif I have never thought to freeze them. I just let them crust on wax paper them place them in a container.

indydebi Posted 25 May 2009 , 2:24pm
post #9 of 16

I always always air dry. Since my icing crusts so well, I can make them in the morning and toss them across the room to someone by the afternoon. I've stored them for days on the counter (on a tray, covered in saran, once they've dried).

angelicconfections Posted 25 May 2009 , 6:21pm
post #10 of 16

thanks indydebi, icon_smile.gif

JCE62108 Posted 25 May 2009 , 6:52pm
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I always always air dry. Since my icing crusts so well, I can make them in the morning and toss them across the room to someone by the afternoon. .




lol. the mental image of someone hurling buttercream roses across the room is a good one. I can picture my husband standing there with his mouth open trying to catch them. lol.

Ive never bothered drying roses. If I have to make them cascading down the side of a cake Ill use little teeny plastic sample spoons stuck in the side to support it. Some people use pretzel sticks or spaghetti to rest the roses on also. I guess that just comes from working in a production type bakery where we dont have the time to wait for stuff like that. A wedding cake is made in 2 to 3 hours at the most (after the cake is baked and cooled).

Freezing BC flowers is fine. I have never, ever had a problem with that.

Cakepro Posted 26 May 2009 , 5:28am
post #12 of 16

Oh yum, I luv me some mummified buttercream roses.

Image

Lcubed82 Posted 26 May 2009 , 1:54pm
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Quote:

Ive never bothered drying roses. If I have to make them cascading down the side of a cake Ill use little teeny plastic sample spoons stuck in the side to support it. Some people use pretzel sticks or spaghetti to rest the roses on also.




I've never heard of this- what a great idea with the little spoons!
Linda

mackeymom Posted 26 May 2009 , 2:09pm
post #14 of 16

Teeny tiny smaple spoone to hold roses?! Genius!!

CookieD-oh Posted 26 May 2009 , 2:17pm
post #15 of 16

[quote="angelicconfections"]... and then I stack them in my trusty orange tupperware square container that I inherited from my mom. quote]

Lucky...my mom won't give up her orange tupperware container icon_mad.gif

Anyway, I have never had a problem freezing roses, either.

angelicconfections Posted 26 May 2009 , 10:12pm
post #16 of 16

[quote="CookieD-oh"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by angelicconfections

... and then I stack them in my trusty orange tupperware square container that I inherited from my mom. quote]

Lucky...my mom won't give up her orange tupperware container icon_mad.gif

Anyway, I have never had a problem freezing roses, either.




not too lucky, note I said inherited, not given. but lucky too, because my grandmother kept some of mom's stuff for me until I grew up so I have some. her old crock pot orange with mushrooms, her old stand mixer, that gave up the ghost a few years ago, copper bowels and few other odds and ends. My favorite is the cuckoo clock my grandfather gave her that he bought in Bavaira waaay back in the 80's icon_smile.gif

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