Is An Electic Pasta Machine Worth It???

Decorating By tonimarie Updated 24 Oct 2013 , 6:45am by rojersequaria

tonimarie Posted 23 May 2009 , 4:04pm
post #1 of 38

I just watched a tutorial on The Pink Cake Box; she used an electic pasta machine to roll the fondant super thin; I thought it looked amazing....just wondering if any of you have purchased one and is it worth it???

37 replies
Redlotusninjagrl Posted 23 May 2009 , 4:11pm
post #2 of 38

I am sure it would be pretty useful and worth it if you do a lot of fondant accents. I mean a lot of fondant accents. I believe the electric ones are pretty pricey although I could be wrong.

TamiAZ Posted 23 May 2009 , 4:19pm
post #3 of 38

Yes!! When I wad doing a lot of cakes I used mine all the time!!

3GCakes Posted 23 May 2009 , 4:22pm
post #4 of 38

If you have ever made a lot of roses with a circle cutter....then you can imagine how it must be helpful.

If only they sold pre-cut paper thin gumpaste circles! What a wonderful world this would be!!

DianeLM Posted 23 May 2009 , 5:19pm
post #5 of 38

OMG, I could not LIVE without my electric pasta machine! It cuts down on the labor by miles! (roll, roll, roll, , turn over, roll, check thickness, roll, add more cornstarch, roll, roll vs. whirrrrrr... done!) It's great for bow loops, flower petals, leaves. Makes all your fondant accents a uniform thickness.

A pasta machine without a motor is like a bicycle without wheels. You'll eventually get to where you're going, but you haven't really saved any time.

cambo Posted 23 May 2009 , 5:25pm
post #6 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

OMG, I could not LIVE without my electric pasta machine! It cuts down on the labor by miles! (roll, roll, roll, , turn over, roll, check thickness, roll, add more cornstarch, roll, roll vs. whirrrrrr... done!) It's great for bow loops, flower petals, leaves. Makes all your fondant accents a uniform thickness.

A pasta machine without a motor is like a bicycle without wheels. You'll eventually get to where you're going, but you haven't really saved any time.




Ditto! I thought I had changed my life forever when I bought the KA attachment, then I also invested in an electric machine and LOVE it! Its fast, accurate and takes up little space compared to my KA! I say whether you do lots of fondant/gumpaste work or not, it's worth every cent!

tonimarie Posted 23 May 2009 , 5:37pm
post #7 of 38

thank you everyone. I think I will have to invest in one icon_smile.gif

cakesbykitty Posted 23 May 2009 , 9:37pm
post #8 of 38

hold the phone!!!!

i have a kitchen aid....

i have a pasta attachment...

i can use that? icon_eek.gificon_lol.gif

cambo Posted 25 May 2009 , 2:24am
post #9 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakesbykitty

hold the phone!!!!

i have a kitchen aid....

i have a pasta attachment...

i can use that? icon_eek.gificon_lol.gif




OOOOOHHHHH YYYEEEAAAAAAAH!

cakesbykitty Posted 25 May 2009 , 2:26am
post #10 of 38

tell me more? as in how to?????

artscallion Posted 25 May 2009 , 2:42am
post #11 of 38

A note to folks who already have a manual pasta machine, you can buy the motor separately. It just snaps right onto most pasta makers over the hole where you would insert the crank. It's still a pretty penny, but cheaper than buying a whole new motorized machine.

Here's a link to the motor, a bit down the page. This happens to be where I bought my nonmotorized machine. It's one of the colored ones. Expensive, but great because it's much wider than the usual ones you see around.

PASTA MOTOR

angelicconfections Posted 25 May 2009 , 3:38am
post #12 of 38

I'm thinking about getting the attachment for my new kitchenaide. I can hardly wait! I make all my fondant myself, so this should be a huge help.

Deana Posted 25 May 2009 , 3:53am
post #13 of 38

I have a hand crank pasta roller... and oh my, how I wished I had a motor on it Friday night as I tried to roll out a 56 inch long piece of fondant to make a ribbon... feed, crank, move, feed, crank ,move, praying it doesn't strech...
I needed either a motor or an extra hand!

I'm definitely looking to invest in the motor now!!

icer101 Posted 25 May 2009 , 4:10am
post #14 of 38

whether you do a lot or not... it is well worth it to have an electric pasta maching.. when i teach gumpaste flowers at michaels.. the students love it ... and say they want one...

DianeLM Posted 25 May 2009 , 1:44pm
post #15 of 38
Quote:
Quote:

This happens to be where I bought my nonmotorized machine. It's one of the colored ones. Expensive, but great because it's much wider than the usual ones you see around.



How wide is your machine? It looks to be the same width as my machine. I didn't see any dimensions in the description.

And most importantly.... WHICH COLOR do you have?? Those are the coolest looking machines I've ever seen! icon_smile.gif

artscallion Posted 25 May 2009 , 2:42pm
post #16 of 38

I have the black one to match my appliances. I'd originally ordered blue to match the tile in my kitchen. But they were on back order icon_razz.gif

The machine itself is about 8" wide. The actual slot you'd feed the dough into is 6" wide. I take it back, though. It seems most of them are 6" wide now. My old one was only 4.5".

DianeLM Posted 26 May 2009 , 1:38pm
post #17 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

I have the black one to match my appliances. I'd originally ordered blue to match the tile in my kitchen. But they were on back order icon_razz.gif

The machine itself is about 8" wide. The actual slot you'd feed the dough into is 6" wide. I take it back, though. It seems most of them are 6" wide now. My old one was only 4.5".




That's bittersweet news... I was hoping there was a wider pasta machine out there, but am now relieved that I don't have to fork out any $$. icon_smile.gif

mommyle Posted 26 May 2009 , 2:04pm
post #18 of 38

No.... if you are looking for wider, you are actually looking at a sheeter.

I have a question about your fondant sticking to the machine... With my hand-crank I have to wipe it down about every second pass, does that happen with the machines too? Or are they somehow less "sticky"? Or does anyone have a good suggestion??? TIA!!!!

DianeLM Posted 26 May 2009 , 2:46pm
post #19 of 38

Well, I was hoping there was something between regular pasta machine and $$$heeter. icon_smile.gif

I never have a sticking problem. I give each side of the fondant a light swipe with my cornstarch puff before running through the machine. One sheet can go from 1 to 5 without any sticking.

I believe hand-crank pasta machines are evil and you should get a motor post-haste! icon_smile.gif

Bellatheball Posted 26 May 2009 , 5:50pm
post #20 of 38

I have one for, well, pasta. It's too much hassel to drag it out for fondant. I have a silicone roller and can get fondant really thin in 1/2 the time it takes me to set up my pasta machine. Clearly I'm in the minority. icon_biggrin.gif

DianeLM Posted 26 May 2009 , 7:14pm
post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bellatheball

I have one for, well, pasta. It's too much hassel to drag it out for fondant. I have a silicone roller and can get fondant really thin in 1/2 the time it takes me to set up my pasta machine. Clearly I'm in the minority. icon_biggrin.gif




Do you have the motorized or manual kind? If it's manual, yeah, you're right... It's not worth the time to set it up. icon_lol.gif

I removed the ravioli maker from the top of my machine so I can store it, with motor attached, in a covered plastic tub on a shelf. I just whip it out whenever I need it and slide it back onto the shelf when I'm done.

Truth be told, I don't even clean it every time I use it. I just brush off the excess cornstarch/powdered sugar and away it goes.

tiggy2 Posted 26 May 2009 , 7:58pm
post #22 of 38

I have the pasta roller attachment for my KA and it's the best money DH ever spent icon_smile.gif I had a hand crank one and never used it because it was too much trouble. I've never had any problem with my KA pasta roller sticking.

Bellatheball Posted 26 May 2009 , 9:37pm
post #23 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bellatheball

I have one for, well, pasta. It's too much hassel to drag it out for fondant. I have a silicone roller and can get fondant really thin in 1/2 the time it takes me to set up my pasta machine. Clearly I'm in the minority. icon_biggrin.gif



Do you have the motorized or manual kind? If it's manual, yeah, you're right... It's not worth the time to set it up. icon_lol.gif

I removed the ravioli maker from the top of my machine so I can store it, with motor attached, in a covered plastic tub on a shelf. I just whip it out whenever I need it and slide it back onto the shelf when I'm done.

Truth be told, I don't even clean it every time I use it. I just brush off the excess cornstarch/powdered sugar and away it goes.




I do have a hand crank because my great aunt would beat me silly if I took shortcuts when making pasta. icon_biggrin.gif That said, I've made hundreds and hundreds of homemade ravoili and I can whip those suckers out even with a hand crank.

Bellatheball Posted 26 May 2009 , 9:38pm
post #24 of 38

Now that I think of it, using a pasta machine is still a shortcut to her but it's the only way I can make ravioli and still walk the next morning. All that rolling out dough kills my back. icon_smile.gif

PinkLisa Posted 26 May 2009 , 11:10pm
post #25 of 38

I just bought the KA pasta roller attachment and I think it's great. However, I also just bought an manual pasta roller at Micheals and only paid $15 with a coupon. I was thinking the manual one would be good to work on sugarflowers given I have have it right next to me and get it out easily. The KA takes up a lot of room and is a hassle to get out every time. Do you think the manual pasta roller would be okay for just doing sugarflowers? I haven't opened it yet and have been debating whether or not I should take it back.

mommyle Posted 27 May 2009 , 2:17am
post #26 of 38

One more question from me... Are you able to buy JUST the pasta roller for the KA, or do you HAVE to buy all 3 (the roller, the ravioli and spaghetti cutters)?

angelicconfections Posted 27 May 2009 , 2:22am
post #27 of 38

no, according to the order form that came with my new ka i just got for mother's day they are sold seperatly

mommyle Posted 27 May 2009 , 4:21am
post #28 of 38

Thank you! *As I pull out my Visa!*

DianeLM Posted 27 May 2009 , 1:48pm
post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bellatheball

Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bellatheball

I have one for, well, pasta. It's too much hassel to drag it out for fondant. I have a silicone roller and can get fondant really thin in 1/2 the time it takes me to set up my pasta machine. Clearly I'm in the minority. icon_biggrin.gif



Do you have the motorized or manual kind? If it's manual, yeah, you're right... It's not worth the time to set it up. icon_lol.gif

I removed the ravioli maker from the top of my machine so I can store it, with motor attached, in a covered plastic tub on a shelf. I just whip it out whenever I need it and slide it back onto the shelf when I'm done.

Truth be told, I don't even clean it every time I use it. I just brush off the excess cornstarch/powdered sugar and away it goes.




I do have a hand crank because my great aunt would beat me silly if I took shortcuts when making pasta. icon_biggrin.gif That said, I've made hundreds and hundreds of homemade ravoili and I can whip those suckers out even with a hand crank.




Far be it from me to offend anyone's great aunt! icon_eek.gif You can easily slip the motor off for pasta making. You don't have to be a hero for fondant. icon_lol.gif

I didn't discard my ravioli attachment. It's just stored separately from the main machine. Mmmmm..... ravioli....... <drool>

jillangel Posted 27 May 2009 , 2:48pm
post #30 of 38

Bed, Bath and Beyond has just the pasta attachment for Kitchen Aid mixers for $59.99. Go to the website and put your email in and print out a 20% off coupon off any single item. This is the best deal I have found so far if you have a Bed, Bath and Beyond near you. HTH

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