Not An Emergency, But Urgent Help Needed, Please !!

Decorating By cyndi29609 Updated 22 May 2009 , 2:47am by cyndi29609

cyndi29609 Posted 21 May 2009 , 5:37pm
post #1 of 8

I'm going to build a Tilted cake for my daughter's 9th birthday party May 30...that's 9 days. I'm not even a semi-pro at constructing cakes or decorating them. I'm a complete novice and amateur. I'm using the wonderful step by step instructions by B.Kieth and I love it that she included photos. But I still have some questions;

1. First, what's the best cake recipe to use when constructing something this big? I would guess I wouldn't want a light fluffy cake(?)

2. Each level, which is tapered (wide at the top gradually narrowing to the bottom), is FIRST set up largest on the bottom tapering UPWARD so that it's easier to work with. Afterwords you flip it over. My question is; HOW DO YOU FLIP IT OVER, right-side-up without destroying the cake?

3. What is the best method for lifting one layer and then lower it onto the the layer it goes on top of?

and

4. Can this cake actually be eaten after the fondant has hardened and there's a "skeleton" inside it?

These are the questions that are holding me up from going ahead with it. I'm scared to death when it comes to moving layers. I probably have a lot of other questions that will pop up along the way, bu
t I think I can figure them out. I just don't want to begin without knowing this first.

Thank you for any help you give me!

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7 replies
artscallion Posted 21 May 2009 , 5:56pm
post #2 of 8

I have no advice for you. There are experienced bakers/decorators who would not attempt what you're attempting. But God bless you for your apparent lack of fear as you walk blindly into the abyss. icon_biggrin.gif

Texas_Rose Posted 21 May 2009 , 6:17pm
post #3 of 8

I haven't made a cake like you're planning. I can answer a couple of your questions though.

To flip the cake over, you would put a cake board on the top, then put your hand on that, pick up the bottom with the other hand and just flip...kind of like you do when you turn a cake out onto the cooling rack and then put another cooling rack on top and flip it, so that it's not resting on the domed top.

You can eat a cake that's covered with fondant and that has supports inside. That's the definition of a lot of wedding cakes, and people always eat those.

To lift a layer, I use a cookie sheet with no edge, slide it under the layer, then lift it up and hold it above the layer it's going onto, then just slide it off of the cookie sheet onto the layer. If it's a small layer you can also use a flexible cutting mat to transfer it with. Some people use a cake lifter too.

sadsmile Posted 21 May 2009 , 6:27pm
post #4 of 8

No you do not want light and fluffy. You want strong and sturdy dense cake for tapering the sides smaller at the bottom. That is hard to do as it weekens the sides and makes it difficult especially for square corners. Round is easier to taper. It is a great look! Can you post your inspiration pics?
Go to youtube and search how to ice, layer and stack cakes. And watch a few. Tonedna1 has great youtubes!

The skeleton you are talking about I am assuming is the structure like dowels, bubble tea straws or SPS. This is what the weight of the cake is resting on. You must use food safe items for this and when cutting the cake you pull them out and slice.

There are topsy turvy cake demos on youtube as well. It is an illusion and only the cakes are carved lopsided and tapered but are resting level on the teir below. You carve out a flat hollow were on top of each tier that the next tier will fit into. SPS is strongly recomended for this as many many disasters have happened. You need to also make sure you do not over fill your layers and allow them to firm up before carving the sides and covering with fondant to keep them from sliding around while working on it.
Have you worked with fondant?


You should practice stacking and decorating and start right away.

cyndi29609 Posted 21 May 2009 , 6:50pm
post #5 of 8

Thank you so much for your help. I'm going to watch the demos on youtube. No, I've never worked with fondant before. My inspiration is here at Cake Central. I just typed in "Instructions for Building a Whimsical Tilted Cake" and the article by BKieth came up with photos. There are a lot of cakes like this on the net though at lots of sites. I'm going to give it a try and the way I see it, they're just 8 & 9 year olds so if it doesn't work out it's no big deal. I may just make it a 2 level cake and only use 2 cake layers for each level. I'll let you know how it turns out, good or bad!
Btw, any suggestions for a good recipe to use for this?
Thanks again

cyndi29609 Posted 21 May 2009 , 6:50pm
post #6 of 8

Thank you so much for your help. I'm going to watch the demos on youtube. No, I've never worked with fondant before. My inspiration is here at Cake Central. I just typed in "Instructions for Building a Whimsical Tilted Cake" and the article by BKieth came up with photos. There are a lot of cakes like this on the net though at lots of sites. I'm going to give it a try and the way I see it, they're just 8 & 9 year olds so if it doesn't work out it's no big deal. I may just make it a 2 level cake and only use 2 cake layers for each level. I'll let you know how it turns out, good or bad!
Btw, any suggestions for a good [size=18](cake)
recipe to use for this?
Thanks again
[/size]

Manna4 Posted 21 May 2009 , 6:53pm
post #7 of 8

Here's my best tip for any kind of cake carvings and tier "handling": have your filled cake well chilled or even semi-frozen. My other suggestion would be to do a trial run with this project in a smaller scale, so you can workout the "kinks". If you are not up for that, then have plan "B" in place...just in case. You wouldn't want your childs party to end up with no cake, and a plan "B" would relieve some of the pressure and help you do a better job and have a lot more fun in the process. thumbs_up.gif

cyndi29609 Posted 22 May 2009 , 2:47am
post #8 of 8

Thanks everybody!

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