For Those Who Stick Wires In Cakes

Decorating By Cakepro Updated 6 Apr 2016 , 10:46pm by WhiskandZest

Pitchers_Bakery Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 7:15am
post #91 of 285

[/quote]

I have to think that the preservatives in food that we eat every day are more dangerous than a wire. LOL. I have a son with food sensitivities and chronic urticaria (he outgrew the food sensitivities but still has the urticaria) and I really got into reading labels...did you know that if you look up the ingredients to McD's fries you can't pronounce anything but the first ingredient, practically? (Sad that french fries have "ingredients" anyway!!!)

Anyway I'm not saying its ok to put wire in cakes haha....I'm just saying that we encounter chemicals and gross things everywhere we go....and daily in our food supply. (Yuck.) If not preservatives, then contaminants from the factories. I've gotten to where I don't freak out about it..yeah I wash my hands ALL the time and my counters stay clean and all that...but I don't freak out if a corner of florist foil touches my cake, and I don't freak out about the toys the kids play with, and etc.

The only thing that freaks me out is restaurant tables and shopping carts. haha. But still not enough to not go out to eat or go to Target. icon_smile.gif[/quote]


I agree, the wire is sooooo minimal to the amount of crap we touch and come in contact with. I understand you are trying to be responsible and inform the cake world of this issue, but its sooooooo small compared to what we actually take in. I honestly will use the straw technique from here on out, but ill still use wires if the client asks for it. Not only that but think about how small of an amount would actually come off if there really is any coming off. It would be very small. I won't freak out and stop using wires, but ill do my best to use something around it.

Just remember you come in contact with sooo much more out there in the real world that can give you cancer, diseases, and viruses.

Safe cake decorating!

sweetlorraine Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 8:07am
post #92 of 285

I did a cake with bees "flying" around it last summer - they were going to be on wires, but regardless of the safety issues, I didn't want to be able to see the wires. So, I went to a plastic/acrylic store (TAP Plastics, here in the Seattle area) and they have several different "guages" of clear acrylic rods that are basically like dowels. I chose to use the size that was about 1/8" in diameter - which was strong enough to hold the fondant bees, and yet bend and sway just a little (so resemble flying). I could've gone one size larger, and had them be very sturdy and stiff. It's a great, food-safe option, and because they are clear, it doesn't detract from your cake! They are really long, so you can get several pieces out of one length, and they are really cheap! Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful!

sweetbiteohoney Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 1:48pm
post #93 of 285

was wondering about that myself

kjt Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 2:32pm
post #94 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetlorraine

I did a cake with bees "flying" around it last summer - they were going to be on wires, but regardless of the safety issues, I didn't want to be able to see the wires. So, I went to a plastic/acrylic store (TAP Plastics, here in the Seattle area) and they have several different "guages" of clear acrylic rods that are basically like dowels. I chose to use the size that was about 1/8" in diameter - which was strong enough to hold the fondant bees, and yet bend and sway just a little (so resemble flying). I could've gone one size larger, and had them be very sturdy and stiff. It's a great, food-safe option, and because they are clear, it doesn't detract from your cake! They are really long, so you can get several pieces out of one length, and they are really cheap! Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful!




Hi Lorraine, and welcome to CC!

Thank you so much for posting this. I am very excited to find a product that doesn't "show", too!

tsal Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 3:44pm
post #95 of 285

Thanks for the pasta suggestion. I am going to try this! I like my cakes to be completely edible (save for the dowels and the boards), so I find this idea particularly appealing!

Calgary_Mama Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 8:25pm
post #96 of 285

I always wondered about this! I put wires into a cake one time, and I was curious about what was in it... will not be doing this again.

tobeydechristopher Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 3:25pm
post #97 of 285

I have used cocktail straws in the past and really thick plastic straws as well. I had no idea there was lead in the floral wires. This might make me rethink my whole gumpaste flowers strategy. What about foam for floral toppers?

I cover mine with fondant and glue a foil covered cake board on the bottom so no foam touches the cake.

sweetlorraine Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 8:58pm
post #98 of 285

Here's a link to the place I get my acrylic rods - they go from 1/16" thick to several inches thick. I could totally see using them as a replacement for wires when making gumpaste flowers, as well as wires for other things sticking out of your cakes. Very cool, and very reasonably priced!
http://www.tapplastics.com/shop/product.php?pid=147&

Ballymena Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 9:23pm
post #99 of 285

Acrylic rods work if you want things to stand rigid. If you want any curves or movement you need to use wires.

bmarlow001 Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 10:03pm
post #100 of 285

Thank you for the post! I use a wire I buy at my local cake decorating store and I hope it's safe but I think from now on I will def use the coffee straw idea.. thank you!

sweetlorraine Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 10:16pm
post #101 of 285

actually, the smaller guage rods work quite well to bend a bit and sway - it all depends on the weight of the item you are placing on it. For instance, the bees I put on mine were fairly heavy, and so the rods bent and swayed nicely. It is true that you definitely won't get the same bendability as wires.

As for me, if I were going to use wires again - I'd just wrap the end that goes into the cake with floral tape - usually white.

SweetSue1 Posted 28 Feb 2010 , 3:48am
post #102 of 285

All of this is making me think about everything we use in our cakes - what about the wooden dowels we use in our cakes? I always freak out if the ends splinter a little after I cut them to size, I file them down or cover the ends with RI. I worry that someone will accidentally ingest a splinter. Can anyone else share what your thoughts are on this? Does anyone wash the dowels before inserting them?

ladij153 Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 1:49am
post #103 of 285

Just a token of information for anyone who is interested. This is the go to site to see if the info in the warning e-mails that get passed around is true or not....this is the information on the Swiffer warning.
http://www.snopes.com/critters/crusader/swiffer.asp

Kitagrl Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 2:11am
post #104 of 285

How hard are the acrylic rods to cut? Can you use wire cutters? I have the site up and may order some! I sometimes need wires (to bend and be flexible) but I have several cake orders where they just want stars sticking up everywhere and the rods would be PERFECT!!!!!!!

I might just be placing an order. Thanks!

Kitagrl Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 2:23am
post #105 of 285

Just placed an order....it looked just too good! icon_smile.gif

Lita829 Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 2:40am
post #106 of 285

Thanks for the info.

Tiffany0481 Posted 5 Apr 2010 , 7:45pm
post #107 of 285

I just used wire/straw process in a cake I did and had a lot of issues with the wire being too heavy and actually tearing the side of my cake. How do you fix this issue?

dreamcakesmom Posted 5 Apr 2010 , 8:25pm
post #108 of 285

Just another thing to put out there but are the plastic rods you are mentioning listed as food safe? If not they are probably as potentially hazardous as the metal wires. Keep in mind the baby bottle controversy that has been lingering for years where they have not taken plastic baby bottles off the shelves and replaced with a "new" type of plastic that is supposed to be ok. This idea may be replacing 1 potentially risky material for another.

Chef_Stef Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 1:39am
post #109 of 285

Not to sound like a smart a$$ but if it's good enough for Ron, Colette, and Sylvia, it's good enough for me.

I buy all my wired flowers from wholesalesugarflowers.com, (too lazy to MAKE them, yuk)... with the assumption that, hey, these are sold for use IN CAKE. It's not like I made them myself with wire from Home Depot, which I am not advocating, of course.

I don't do a lot that requires wired flowers, but if I need them, I use them, usually wrapped, and they go in the cake just like the above decorators. If it were a LOT of wires, I'd use picks or straws if practical, but if that won't work, technical-wise, then I assemble the cake in the best way for it to stay together until served.

tobeydechristopher Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 2:49am
post #110 of 285

I have looked at Sylvia Weinstocks cakes really close up in her new book and sure enough, they are stuck right in the cake. Same for Ron because I believe he started his cake career under Sylvia Weinstock. Colette as well. It is Nicholas Lodge who is adamantly against sticking wire in cakes and he uses cell picks which he secures into the cake and secures the floral displays in the cell picks with fondant plugs. That is another way to do it but the British have other methods.

I am hoping some British flower makers discuss their methods here. That would be so helpful.

JanH Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 2:54am
post #111 of 285

Wires in Cake:
(Multi-linked thread.)

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-265133-.html

HTH

allaboutcakeuk Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 5:52pm
post #112 of 285

Its great to see this brought to the attention of all cake fans. Here in the UK we are NEVER allowed to put wires directly into cakes and always have to use a flower (posy) pick. it does make good health and safety sense as who knows what happens to some of the wire once the ingredients of the cake get to work on it? We have to use posy picks as they are sealed at the bottom therefore nothing can ever get into the cake. You can secure your wires inside the posy pick with a little icing.. It actually looks much nicer if you are making a big wired starburst and is easier to hold onto for shaping the wires and getting them looking good. thanks for posting this

tricia1973 Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 6:39pm
post #113 of 285

I am currently making my first cake that requires wire. I just got on here & checked for posts on whether or not I could insert the wire into the cake. Came across this post. Didn't read through all the replies, but someone mentioned putting the wire into a coffee stirrer. I just want to say THANK YOU. I don't have the time to redo what I've already done. I can just get some of the coffee stirrers or something similiar to stick the wire into. So grateful for this forum!

tobeydechristopher Posted 15 Apr 2010 , 5:15pm
post #114 of 285

Hi Tricia,
You can use cocktail straws as well. But I am going to give posie picks a try as the cake maker from the UK described..I think you can buy those on the web.

allaboutcakeuk Posted 15 Apr 2010 , 7:43pm
post #115 of 285

Hi, just thought I would add a little to what has been replied to already about the wires in cakes and wired sugar flowers etc as i'm from the UK and I know how differently things are done from country to country. its interesting to see how everyone does stuff.

In reply to tobeydechristopher i'm very happy to discuss how we make sugar flowers and display them here in the UK if you're interested. I am a UK cake maker and have just finished my professional diploma in sugar flowers.

In reply to it being good for them its good enough for us I guess it just comes down to what you are happy with and also your legal regulations may be different. in this country certain items are not allowed to be placed directly into a cake which is why we just use posy picks. To me if i received a cake that had a wire pushed directly into the edible part of the cake I wouldn't be happy. Who knows what may break off when you pull that wire out to cut the cake? Could you see a small piece of metal wire that may break off the end amongst a heap of fruit or a dark chocolate cake. I know I couldn't so that gets served to a young child and they choke on it? with a posy pick or similar device everything is contained within that pick. Its removed along with the wires stored safely inside before cutting the cake so you know your cake is safe.

the other issue that we look at in the UK is this - if you buy something from anywhere be it plastic, metal, wood or otherwise do you know where that has been before you put it in your cake. that item may have changed hands many times in a factory, sat in a warehouse, been touched so many times then it just gets pushed inside a cake with no thought for how food safe it is. All posy picks are food safe and you can get really tiny ones if you just want to put a single stem in the side of a cake. Larger posy picks also have serrated ends so they grip onto the cake and stop the things happening like large bunches of flowers tearing the side of the icing off.

If you want your wires to stick straight up you can use a larger gauge wire the same as those used for making sugar flowers. The lower the number (i.e. 22) the thicker the wire is.

Hope this helps shed some light on why in the UK we use these things and if anyone wants to ask any questions please feel free i'd love to hear from you here in the UK

http://www.allaboutcake.co.uk/ icon_biggrin.gif

bridge72 Posted 13 May 2010 , 5:22pm
post #116 of 285

I have wondered about this also...and I work in an ice cream factory that uses wires (that are heated) to cut slices of ice cream ( as in round ice cream sandwiches) would this type of wire be okay to use in cake?????

thecakemaker Posted 13 May 2010 , 5:30pm
post #117 of 285

I haven't read all of these but wanted to say / add that I use coffee stirrers (sp) or for a lot of wires together a straw. If you need to hold the wire tight in the straw you can fill the straw with chocolate so they don't move around.

Debbie

jessielynne Posted 14 May 2010 , 11:39pm
post #118 of 285

Thanks for posting this information. I am making a cake for my daughter's birthday tomorrow and have made a ton of gum paste flowers (the instructions told me to place flowers on wire) and i was worried about how to insert the wires into the cake. I will try out the coffee stirrer technique.

nikki67 Posted 18 May 2010 , 1:44pm
post #119 of 285

I have been trying to find out how to attach a handle to a cake for my friend's daughter's birthday. She saw this cake by cc member cbonenbe and asked if I could do something similar. I have never used wire in cakes, and never made a handle like this so I am really in need of advice...can the wire go through the mmf balls, and if so, can they still be eaten? Not even sure what gauge wire to use, but it seems I could put straws in the purse and stick the wire from the handles into it? Thanks for any advice, I wouldn't want to make anyone ill from the wire being in the cake! Link to the cake: http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1668884.html
LL

endymion Posted 18 May 2010 , 2:24pm
post #120 of 285

nikkie, Why don't you send a PM to cbonenbe to see how it was done? I think you could get the handle to work using skewers or lollipop sticks or staws to hold it in the cake, and just sticking all the pieces together (leaving plenty of drying time so it is sturdy) without and wire. But have never tried it myself; maybe someone else knows different.

I have used long, skinny plastic lollipop sticks (the kind they use for "lollipop bouquets"). My son really liked the lollipops, so I would cut off the end and let him have the candy and then use the sticks for my cakes. They bend and sway and are semi-transparent (and hollow in the middle--I have also used them to insert fine wired roses into a cake. Have seen them at Michael's and at Asian food stores.

Wish I could find a source for the sticks without buying the candies!

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