Can We Start A "favorite" Thread?

Decorating By underthesun Updated 19 May 2009 , 10:04pm by underthesun

underthesun Posted 16 May 2009 , 12:13pm
post #1 of 23

I'm hesitated posting this for about an hour, now, but here goes....

A favorite cake recipe thread with your favorite "go to recipe? Just now reading posts on "how do I?" 3 different newbies asking about cake recipes that work well for stacking and fondant. I also am looking and experimenting for that perfect "go to recipes". I have checked old threads and they end up being 90% advice on looking for the right recipe, which don't get me wrong, I have learned lots about ratio and science of cake baking. And it has enticed me to do my own research. But in the end, it is a constant trial and error with scratch cakes. I find myself using WASC a lot because I know it will work. I like WASC, but I can taste the mix. I still use it because it works and some of my friends really like the taste. But I'm still looking for the scratch recipes.

I search the "recipes" everyday, but it is very difficult to choose what to use and then again, trial and error. It would be GREAT to get recommendations on specific recipes. I know others feel the same. Can some of you GREAT fondant decorators out there share your "#1 BEST" go to scratch recipe?

I'm looking for that cake which can be trimmed with out falling apart, moist, without being crumbly when I trim or crumb coat, rises well so that I can level using my 2" pan (yes, I use the wilton batter chart). I know that's asking a lot, but I know it would help many many of us newer CC'ers. And, yes, I know I'm just setting myself up for more experimenting, but at least I'd do it on the recommendation of the GREAT fondant CC'ers.

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22 replies
grama_j Posted 16 May 2009 , 12:19pm
post #2 of 23

GREAT IDEA !!!! thumbs_up.gif

vickymacd Posted 16 May 2009 , 12:24pm
post #3 of 23

This is a great idea, but once again, everyone bakes differently, uses different measurments, has tastes different, so I think what one person ends up liking is not likeable to someone else. Guess that's why there are so many recipes, bakeries, etc. in this world.

Good luck though. I love trying new recipes, and I agree with you, hate when they flop! This is going to be a tough one.

underthesun Posted 16 May 2009 , 1:29pm
post #4 of 23

I know everyone has different tastes, but it would be great if those just starting out could narrow the experiment options to 500 recipes rather than 1000. Just thought a thread on "easy to decorate with fondant" cake recipes would really help newbies out. icon_biggrin.gif

vickymacd Posted 16 May 2009 , 2:06pm
post #5 of 23

I guess I'm with you on the WASC cake still the favorite. That and Kakeladi's original recipe is best. I tried the choc. version of WASC cake, and didn't care for the taste.

ptanyer Posted 16 May 2009 , 2:24pm
post #6 of 23

Do you have any books by well know cake artists like Collette Peters, Sylvia Weinstock, etc? They have recipes in them for scratch cakes. So far I am using two of Collette Peters recipes as part of my standard cake recipes. They both are moist, trim well, stack well, and can be covered with buttercream & fondant. One is her Coco-Loco cake ( I leave out the coconut and substitute the bourbon for Bailey's Irish Cream, or Kaluha, or best of all - Godiva Chocolate Liquer). Her Carrot Cake recipe is wonderful and the best I have ever tasted. For pound cake, I use a family recipe which is moist and very sturdy. I am currently working my way through all of my cake books trying out recipes and making notes about each recipe. There is no lack of people to eat the experiments as I have multiple grandchildren, as well as my DH and nephew!

I don't put alot of stock in the CC ratings on recipes. I used a carrot cake receipe that was a 5* rated recipe and it was absolutely awful. I didn't bother to make a test run first, just trusted the CC ratings and ended up throwing out 4 batches of carrot cake mix (which included 8 lbs of shredded carrot). So needless to say I am a little leary of posted cake recipes unless CCer's have personally talked about them and shared the recipes in a thread.

Hope that helps icon_smile.gif

Pam

underthesun Posted 16 May 2009 , 2:30pm
post #7 of 23

That's great Pam! Actually I am currently going through 3 books, one of which is Colette's. The white cake actually failed, miserably, and I was very careful about over-beating, but I did use the regular KA attachment. Going to retry with the flat paddle. Also, found different version on internet. On my list to try, also. Thanks!

ptanyer Posted 16 May 2009 , 3:21pm
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by underthesun

That's great Pam! Actually I am currently going through 3 books, one of which is Colette's. The white cake actually failed, miserably, and I was very careful about over-beating, but I did use the regular KA attachment. Going to retry with the flat paddle. Also, found different version on internet. On my list to try, also. Thanks!




Underthe sun, I don't know of a recipe that calls for using anything but the flat paddle for mixing cakes. That's probably why your cake failed. Also, if you can do it, measuring ingredients by weight is best. You can get a good food weight scale at Target or even Bed Bath and Beyond. Once you sign up with BB&B, they will mail you coupons good for $10 off a certain amount, or 20% off and usually you can use those coupons on line at their website. My scale will weigh up to 15 lbs and can weigh in ounces or grams. Also has a button to zero out the scale after you place a bowl or something on top of it to hold whatever you are weighing. If my recipes don't come with weight measurements, I am converting them and re-writing them. Makes life so much easier icon_smile.gif

Peridot Posted 16 May 2009 , 10:50pm
post #9 of 23

ptanyer,

I guess I just learned something new again. So you are not supposed to use the KA wire whisk when mixing cake batter. I am supposed to use the paddle? Can you tell me why? Does the whisk incorporate too much air? Is this true for both scratch and box mix cakes.

Also can you please tell me the brand name on you scale and where did you get it - sounds like what I have been looking for.

Thanks.

indydebi Posted 16 May 2009 , 11:34pm
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by underthesun

Just thought a thread on "easy to decorate with fondant" cake recipes would really help newbies out. icon_biggrin.gif




I use box mixes on my fondant cakes and they hold up fine. So is it the cake mix/recipe, or is it how thick and heavy you roll the fondant? (I use chocopan and can roll it REALLY thin.)

I'm always cautious when people ask for "the BEST" on anything. Something is "the best" only in one's opinion. What I call the best, you may say totally sucks and vice versa.

A recipe that works in Indiana may not work in Colorado because of the high altitude. An icing that holds up in dry Arizona may not work in the humidity of summer in Alabama.

JanH Posted 17 May 2009 , 12:43am
post #11 of 23

CC member contributed scratch recipes:
(Most not found in the recipes section.)

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-440803-.html

Gourmet scratch cake recipes thread:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-626211-.html

Assorted recipe links:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-625803-.html

HTH

underthesun Posted 17 May 2009 , 11:01am
post #12 of 23

Jan: YOU ARE AWESOME!!! I went in search for a thread exactly like this one to pass on to a few newbies yesterday and came up with very little. Had actually searched for similar threads, several weeks ago, in order to find recipes others had tried. I may be baking all day!

This is exactly what I was looking for. Are you the one they refer to as the "Librarian"?

Thank you so much for looking this up!!

icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

Cathy26 Posted 17 May 2009 , 11:02am
post #13 of 23

i use Lindy smiths recipes available in all her books and i love them, but i do need to use wet towels, a thermometer and a foil tent and heat core in larger cakes to get them to work out which isnt mentioned in the books!! i would throughly recomend her recipes though.

underthesun Posted 17 May 2009 , 11:22am
post #14 of 23

ptanyer: Thanks for the info. I actually do use a scale and prefer recipes measured by weight. This particular recipe was not based on weights. I actually discussed my surprise at this, while mixing the cake, to my DH. We both thought it was unfortunate that all the recipes, in the book, were like this.

Interesting that you convert all your recipes. If I try this one again, I may sit down first and try converting. Do you use a chart to do this or do you measure out, weigh, and adjust depending on how the cake turns out??

Evoir Posted 17 May 2009 , 12:01pm
post #15 of 23

Weights can vary too, depending on batches of flour for example, or humidity in the air, or other factors.

But I still prefer weighing to measuring for accuracy!

ptanyer Posted 17 May 2009 , 4:18pm
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peridot

ptanyer,

I guess I just learned something new again. So you are not supposed to use the KA wire whisk when mixing cake batter. I am supposed to use the paddle? Can you tell me why? Does the whisk incorporate too much air? Is this true for both scratch and box mix cakes.

Also can you please tell me the brand name on you scale and where did you get it - sounds like what I have been looking for.

Thanks.




I'm not an expert, but yes I believe that the whisk does incorporate too much air into the batter. I think I have only used it when I am whipping cream, making meringues, whipping chocolate ganache, that kind of thing.
But the recipe will usually state if you are to use the whisk.

I bought my scale from Bed Bath & Beyond. It is a Salter and was $29.99 before a coupon I had. Here is the link:
http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?order_num=-1&SKU=13970254

Also available from Target (but never have a coupon from Target icon_sad.gif ):
http://www.target.com/Salter-Housewares-Stainless-Electronic-Kitchen/dp/B000JNXRBC/sr=1-4/qid=1242576435/ref=sr_1_4/182-6896178-2245422?ie=UTF8&frombrowse=0&index=target&rh=k%3Asalter&page=1

Might also find them on Ebay.

Hope that helps.
Pam

Edited to add: I made a mistake in an earlier post in this thread when I said that my scale weighs up to 15 lbs. It actually weighs up to 7 lbs. Sorry about that.

ptanyer Posted 17 May 2009 , 4:40pm
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by underthesun

ptanyer: Thanks for the info. I actually do use a scale and prefer recipes measured by weight. This particular recipe was not based on weights. I actually discussed my surprise at this, while mixing the cake, to my DH. We both thought it was unfortunate that all the recipes, in the book, were like this.

Interesting that you convert all your recipes. If I try this one again, I may sit down first and try converting. Do you use a chart to do this or do you measure out, weigh, and adjust depending on how the cake turns out??




I found a website that has great conversion tables and use them first and then make notes after the recipe has been made to see if I need to adjust the weights.

I printed out the charts and keep them in a notebook, but also put a shortcut to the website on my computer.

Here is the link: http://startcooking.com/blog/333/Measurement-and-Conversion-Charts.

When all is said and done, then I re-write the recipe and print it and laminate it so I can hang in on one of my kitchen cabinet doors where I do most of my work. I don't have much counterspace, so hanging it on a cabinet door puts it right at eye level and much easier to see.

Pam

JanH Posted 17 May 2009 , 8:15pm
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by underthesun

This is exactly what I was looking for. Are you the one they refer to as the "Librarian"?

Thank you so much for looking this up!!

icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif




You're very welcome, underthesun. It was my pleasure to help. icon_biggrin.gif

Yes, I've been called the "Librarian"..... icon_lol.gif

Peridot Posted 19 May 2009 , 9:33pm
post #19 of 23

ptanyer,

Thank you so much for answering my questions.

panchanewjersey Posted 19 May 2009 , 9:43pm
post #20 of 23

JanH your da bomb!

underthesun Posted 19 May 2009 , 9:56pm
post #21 of 23

I second that! icon_biggrin.gif

SugarLover2 Posted 19 May 2009 , 9:59pm
post #22 of 23

Great thread! I happened to try the Darn Good Chocolate cake in the CC recipes and out of the 3 times I have made it, everyone raves about it. It's nice to cover in fondant, tastes wonderful-ok, not exactly scratch, but it's soooo good.

underthesun Posted 19 May 2009 , 10:04pm
post #23 of 23

It's been raining for 3 days now and more expected. Even with humidity, I had a great day of decorating, so maybe, I'll try that Darn Good Chocolate Cake or one of the many others JanH gave me to look at. I've learned to love rainy days!!!

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