Crisco Or Powdered Sugar?

Decorating By cake-a-licious11 Updated 22 May 2009 , 4:45pm by taxlady1

cake-a-licious11 Posted 15 May 2009 , 7:38pm
post #1 of 32

In the classes I took they taught us to roll fondat using crisco to keep it from sticking. When I watch Foodnetwork it seems that they use powdered suger. Which is better?

31 replies
goldenegg Posted 15 May 2009 , 7:42pm
post #2 of 32

i think it's a matter of preference, i prefer crisco

FlourPots Posted 15 May 2009 , 7:46pm
post #3 of 32

I also prefer Crisco.

TammyH Posted 15 May 2009 , 7:51pm
post #4 of 32

It depends on what I'm doing... If I'm trying to soften it up (after it's been wrapped), I use crisco. If I'm making cut-outs I use ps (that way the cut-outs dont "stick" to the counter and I can pick them up without them streaching out).

HTH

TammyH

txnonnie Posted 21 May 2009 , 12:15am
post #5 of 32

Interesting to know from TammyH. Thanks for the tip.

idjitmom Posted 21 May 2009 , 3:13am
post #6 of 32

I use corn starch. I find it easier to clean off the final product than powdered sugar. Shortening, for some reason, always gives me fits.

TexasSugar Posted 21 May 2009 , 3:27am
post #7 of 32

If I am covering a cake I roll it out on my mat covered in crisco. If I am doing little pieces then I roll it out on powder sugar.

The thing I like about the crisco is that you can pick the mat you rolled it out on and laying it all over the cake then peel the mat away. If I wasn't rolling it out on a mat I'd probably go for the powder sugar.

If you do roll it out on powder sugar or cornstarch you should pick it up and turn it every few rolls to make sure it is not sticking. Nothing like getting that fondant to the size you need then have it stick to the surface you rolled it out on!

madgeowens Posted 21 May 2009 , 4:45am
post #8 of 32

I have been using crisco to grease my plastic mat to work the fondant and roll it oout, but it sems to me that it may be the cause of elephant skin looking mmf? What do you all think? It works much better than dusting with ps....that makes it stick I think...I am new to this so I wonder what you experts think?

SpringFlour Posted 21 May 2009 , 5:02am
post #9 of 32

I use shortening when I'm rolling out a big piece to cover a cake, powdered sugar when I'm doing smaller pieces. I hate that my hands get all slippery on the rolling pin when I'm using shortening.

jer702 Posted 21 May 2009 , 5:08am
post #10 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringFlour

I use shortening when I'm rolling out a big piece to cover a cake, powdered sugar when I'm doing smaller pieces. I hate that my hands get all slippery on the rolling pin when I'm using shortening.




This is exactly what I do

Cakepro Posted 21 May 2009 , 5:42am
post #11 of 32

If it's fondant with alot of fat in it (like white chocolate or dark chocolate fondant), then powdered sugar would be the better choice, because using shortening on a higher-fat fondant would produce pitting and you could have stretching/tearing issues.

Otherwise, it's pretty much what your preference is.

madgeowens Posted 21 May 2009 , 5:50am
post #12 of 32

WHy does mmf get elephant skin....droopy

Cakepro Posted 21 May 2009 , 5:59am
post #13 of 32

I dunno. The few times I made MMF, I never had that problem.

Now, when Satin Ice gets elephant skin, it happens when the very outer surface of the fondant has dried and then wrinkles when it is moved. Droopy would definitely not be the word to describe what elephant skinned-fondant looks like. Droopy is an altogether different problem, probably caused by the fondant being too stretchy, like from too much shortening or too little powdered sugar...or it could even be that the buttercream underneath was too soft and too thick, so it slid downward under the weight of the fondant.

madgeowens Posted 21 May 2009 , 6:23am
post #14 of 32

Oh I thought droopy was what they were referring to as elephant skinn lol.........well I got it with mmf I didnt let sit over night, and I think too much shortening.....thanks
satin ice cracks....I don't think I like that

Cakepro Posted 21 May 2009 , 6:35am
post #15 of 32

Cracks? Yikes! I've been using it for many years and have never had it crack.

mclaren Posted 21 May 2009 , 1:07pm
post #16 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

If it's fondant with alot of fat in it (like white chocolate or dark chocolate fondant), then powdered sugar would be the better choice, because using shortening on a higher-fat fondant would produce pitting and you could have stretching/tearing issues.

Otherwise, it's pretty much what your preference is.




oh is that so? i've been getting tears when i tried to lift the WC fondant using the rolling pin, and i only roll with shortening. so that is the reason...


however, i've never had any success rolling with either PS or CS, it will stick no matter how many times i turn.
so i gave up and stick with shortening.
but little did i know it can cause tearing for WC fondant. icon_cry.gif

at the moment the only way for me to lift without making it tear is by rolling it on a parchment and lifting the parchment together with the fondant. lay the whole thing on the cake, then peel off the parchment.
the downside of this is, if it's a doll cake i'm covering, it will produce creases on the fondant icon_cry.gif

i guess i really have to go and purchase that plastic mat!

alaurence Posted 21 May 2009 , 1:22pm
post #17 of 32

I've always used powdered sugar, but I think I may give crisco a try.

Anyone have a good suggestion on how to get all the powdered sugar off the fondant after the fact? I've done a couple cakes covered in black chocopan and for the life of me, I haven't been able to get all the white powder off of it. Always looks a little chalky. icon_cry.gif

DollyCakes Posted 21 May 2009 , 7:00pm
post #18 of 32

We use cornstarch when we're rolling it out to put on a cake and when we're cutting out things. The only time we use crisco is when we're trying to soften it or get some moisture back into it. It tends to get too stretchy with crisco.

Cakepro Posted 21 May 2009 , 7:17pm
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaurence

I've always used powdered sugar, but I think I may give crisco a try.

Anyone have a good suggestion on how to get all the powdered sugar off the fondant after the fact? I've done a couple cakes covered in black chocopan and for the life of me, I haven't been able to get all the white powder off of it. Always looks a little chalky. icon_cry.gif




Put a little Crisco on a paper towel and rub the fondant. This will take off the PS residue and will bring the luster in the fondant. icon_smile.gif

If you have an airbrush, you can also just airbrush the cake with vodka, which gets rid of excess PS or cornstarch. That's my preference.

madgeowens Posted 21 May 2009 , 8:08pm
post #20 of 32

I must just be sooooo lucky LOL

Momkiksbutt Posted 21 May 2009 , 8:17pm
post #21 of 32

Nick Lodge says use only powdered sugar. Adding more fat to the fondant will make it too soft. Also, the kind of rolling pin you use will make all the difference in whether your fondant sticks or not. If you are using a wooden rolling pin for this, switch to a nylon one. Wilton makes them in two sizes. the small(8 inch) one, typically used for gum paste, and the large(24 inch) one for fondant. You can also use a metal one, but I think they are likely spendy.

Rylan Posted 21 May 2009 , 8:25pm
post #22 of 32

Satin Ice isn't consistent with every batch, thats what I wanted to try Jennifer Dontz semi homemade recipe.

I have an Ateco mat and never really used it. I prefer rolling my fondant on the counter, dusting it with a mixture of cornstarch and powdered sugar.

AverageMom Posted 21 May 2009 , 8:26pm
post #23 of 32

I use crisco with my MMF. Powdered sugar just dried it out too much. I roll directly on my granite counter tops, and I wipe a thin layer of Crisco on it first. I also put it on my hands. If I'm doing little pieces, then I use PS to keep it from sticking to the cutter.

artscallion Posted 21 May 2009 , 8:29pm
post #24 of 32

I used PS when I began doing fondant...heard here that crisco was better...tried it and had a terrible time with sticking , tearing, stretching and sagging... switched back to PS but it was still not the ideal experience. Finally tried CS and haven't looked back.

Cakepro Posted 21 May 2009 , 8:34pm
post #25 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momkiksbutt

Nick Lodge says use only powdered sugar. Adding more fat to the fondant will make it too soft. Also, the kind of rolling pin you use will make all the difference in whether your fondant sticks or not.




Nicholas Lodge uses Albert User Massa Americana fondant exclusively, which is already very soft. Different fondants (and fondants of different fat contents) work better with different non-stick agents. Wilton is better with Crisco, as it is a drier, harder fondant and can tolerate shortening, for example. For years I've used Crisco with Satin Ice, and the white Satin Ice handles beautifully with it, but the dark chocolate Satin Ice becomes too soft and stretchy.

Also, some climates cannot handle just powdered sugar due to its hygroscopic properties, in which case cornstarch is preferred.

No matter what kind of rolling pin you use, what you have UNDER the fondant will determine whether it sticks to the surface or not.

Mclaren, I recommend using a thick vinyl sheet for rolling out your fondant. You can buy clear heavy vinyl on the roll at many Wal-Marts, Hobby Lobby stores, and at just about every fabric store. It is the vinyl one normally uses to cover the dining room table with to protect the tablecloth from spills. Get yourself a white knee-high stocking from the store and load about half a cup of cornstarch, powdered sugar, or a combination of the two into it, and secure it with a rubber band or twist-tie. Then go to town powdering up your vinyl work mat. Don't be afraid of using too much! The fondant will not stick to the mat if you use plenty of non-stick agent. You could also use shortening if you prefer. Just spread a generous amount out on the mat.

You can do it! Image You just have to have enough non-stick stuff down first in order for your fondant to not stick.

FlourPots Posted 21 May 2009 , 8:37pm
post #26 of 32

What's CS?

solascakes Posted 21 May 2009 , 8:47pm
post #27 of 32

DollyCakes I love your avatar,I will weigh myself like that from now on to avoid depression.
I normally use a mixture of CS and PS to roll fondant big or small I just put a bit of both in a shaker.

FlourPots Posted 21 May 2009 , 8:49pm
post #28 of 32

Oh Duh! It just hit me...cornstarch.

Momkiksbutt Posted 21 May 2009 , 8:59pm
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Quote:

Satin Ice isn't consistent with every batch, thats what I wanted to try Jennifer Dontz semi homemade recipe.

I have an Ateco mat and never really used it. I prefer rolling my fondant on the counter, dusting it with a mixture of cornstarch and powdered sugar.

_________________




Try switching to Albert Uster brand products....they are to die for!!!!

madgeowens Posted 22 May 2009 , 3:18am
post #30 of 32

ok I bought a heavy vinyl at walmart and the first time I used it .....it was great........must have been luck, because it sticks now every time....I don't know if I should use crisco or cs or what........my hair is getting thin from pulling it out here.

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