?- Let Bride Drive Cake 3 Hours?

Decorating By brea1026 Updated 13 May 2009 , 10:26pm by gailsgoodies

brea1026 Posted 12 May 2009 , 11:23pm
post #1 of 18

Okay, soooo here is my delema. I am NOT a professional cake decorator. I happily make cakes for all my friends and family, and luckily tons of people I went to school and church with growing up are getting married, having kids, etc etc. So I have had a lot of guinea pigs.

So, a girl I know is getting married in Sedona, AZ which is almost 3 hours away from my house in phx area. I am a stay at home mom of 3 little kids (baby included) and don't want to ask my hubby to take one of his few days off- on a friday- so I can deliver a cake. I have made it very clear to this girl that if I do decide to make the cake for her that I can not guarantee that it will make it to the reception in good condition. I usually assemble all of my cakes on location and have never tried to drive a 3 tier-75 ppl cake. She says she is fine with that and is willing to take her chances because she really wants one of my cakes.

So my question is- would you do it? If so, do you have any sugguestions about making the cake as stable as possible. I cover my cakes with Satin Ice, so hopefully that will help. I also keep it in a very cold fridge until people pick them up.

Thanks for any advice you may have! Breanna

17 replies
bizatchgirl Posted 12 May 2009 , 11:29pm
post #2 of 18

Talk to LeahS or find the sticky at the top of the forums for SPS. According to LeahS, she's done cakes of 5 tiers and transported them fully stacked with no problems. That's from memory, not a direct quote.

confectioneista Posted 12 May 2009 , 11:34pm
post #3 of 18

I agree, use the SPS - it's great! And suggest she have someone ride along with her to help keep an eye on the cake. At least the drive to Sedona isn't too bad, if she's taking the interstate (which I'm sure she would). Remind her to have her car air on the whole time to keep the cake cool, and also to keep the cake out of direct sunlight. HTH

sadsmile Posted 12 May 2009 , 11:40pm
post #4 of 18

Tell her to drive like a granny who stops, starts and takes turns super de duper slow or the extra force will pull the cake apart.

brea1026 Posted 12 May 2009 , 11:45pm
post #5 of 18

Thanks so much for the advice! I actually always use the sps system for my wedding cakes (with a little variation- I skip the cardboard step and place cakes right on the pastic plates, push dowels into cake, then top with plate). I just haven't tried traveling this way. I think I will give it a go though!

Thanks again!
Breanna

LaBellaFlor Posted 13 May 2009 , 12:02am
post #6 of 18

I think if the bride wants it she can arrange to have it picked up. BUT my real question is, WHY do you not consider yourself a PROFESSIONAL baker/decorator?!?! Your work is AWSOME!!!!!!!!!! It is such upscale & grand work, you could be making a killing in this business. You would get what ever price you charge. I just thought you should know this, cause your work is wonderful! icon_smile.gif

idjitmom Posted 13 May 2009 , 12:17am
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by brea1026

Thanks so much for the advice! I actually always use the sps system for my wedding cakes (with a little variation- I skip the cardboard step and place cakes right on the pastic plates, push dowels into cake, then top with plate). I just haven't tried traveling this way. I think I will give it a go though!

Thanks again!
Breanna




I would use the cardboard - or the foam core board - for this one. Not using anything can make the cake sweat, & I would imagine, make it more likely to slip under any stress.

brea1026 Posted 13 May 2009 , 5:11am
post #8 of 18

Thanks LaBellaFlor! That was such a sweet thing to say and means a lot to me. I hope to someday be able to at least rent licensed kitchen space so I can actually make $ doing what I love.

Idgitmom- so the cardboard helps collect moisture? I have skipped that step in the past because it is so dry here in az that when I use Satin Ice, if the cake shifts as I am trying to move it, it cracks. I have found that the cardboard is too flimsy to hold cakes 8"+ without bending. I have never used foamcore though. Is that stronger?

[/quote]

idjitmom Posted 13 May 2009 , 5:58am
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by brea1026

Thanks LaBellaFlor! That was such a sweet thing to say and means a lot to me. I hope to someday be able to at least rent licensed kitchen space so I can actually make $ doing what I love.

Idgitmom- so the cardboard helps collect moisture? I have skipped that step in the past because it is so dry here in az that when I use , if the cake shifts as I am trying to move it, it cracks. I have found that the cardboard is too flimsy to hold cakes 8"+ without bending. I have never used foamcore though. Is that stronger?


[/quote]

I don't know that it collects moisture - though my cardbard does/can get soggy if I don't cover it - but I think w/ SPS a big part of the cardboard is that it 'hooks' onto the little spike in the middle of the cake plate, & that helps stabalize the whole thing. My thinking goes that w/ just cake there, the spike would tear through that a lot easier than the cardboard (of foam core board), & if it was 'sweaty' to start w/, that slidding might occur easier, especially under the stress of an extended drive. Of course I am far from an expert w/ SPS - I've used it exactly twice, and all of my other information comes from what I've read here!

And yes, foam core is much stronger. I just used the 3/8" for the first time, & won't be using anything else for anything important! And the 1/2" - I looked at it & wow, that would be a ton of support!! You can find both sizes of the boards at Michaels, and the 3/8ths also at the Dollar Store.

confectioneista Posted 13 May 2009 , 7:23pm
post #10 of 18

Foam board is definitely the way to go for supporting your cakes! It's lightweight but very sturdy so it won't buckle. I use it also for the bases that my cakes sit on, too. Just make sure to use a sharp Xacto knife and have replacement blades on hand. You'll know when you need to change out the blade (after a lot of use of course) because it won't be as easy to cut through the foam board. HTH

PinkZiab Posted 13 May 2009 , 7:41pm
post #11 of 18

You NEED to use cardboard with SPS... that is what holds the cakes in place. If you jsut put the cake on the plate with the spike, the spike can rip right throught he cake and slide off... the cardboard on the spike is what holds the cake there.

I use masonite and dowels myself, but either way if the cake is properly constructed and supported you should have NO problems with her driving it (barring unforeseen circumstances of course). I deliver ALL of my cakes fully assembled, and haven't had a disaster from it yet (knock wood!)

jamiekwebb Posted 13 May 2009 , 7:49pm
post #12 of 18

Good advice. Also tell her to run her AC wide open and that if it something happens once it is in her hands it is her responsibilty.

Uniqueask Posted 13 May 2009 , 8:05pm
post #13 of 18

I have a successful stacking video from sharon Z, And the Info in there is great, she uses bubble tea straws, instead of wooden dowels, and foamcore boards, and her support system is really great, if you have the time and the funds you should get her videos, I am not saying that you need them because your work is great, I do agree with Labelle Flor but we can always learn a few new tricks from other professionals.

bakingatthebeach Posted 13 May 2009 , 8:08pm
post #14 of 18

Definitely use the cardboard for the SPS.

gailsgoodies Posted 13 May 2009 , 8:14pm
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBellaFlor

I think if the bride wants it she can arrange to have it picked up. BUT my real question is, WHY do you not consider yourself a PROFESSIONAL baker/decorator?!?! Your work is AWSOME!!!!!!!!!! It is such upscale & grand work, you could be making a killing in this business. You would get what ever price you charge. I just thought you should know this, cause your work is wonderful! icon_smile.gif





I agree!! I just spent an hour going through your pictures and each one is better than the last!! FANTASTIC work!!

Gail

pinkbox Posted 13 May 2009 , 9:13pm
post #16 of 18

First... I agree with the others on using the Foam Core. Very strong...and will work for the small size of cake (75 right?)

2nd.... I use bubble straws for support... or dowels will work... with a dowel or two down the middle if you can for preventing slipping.

3rd... send her with that stuff that you put in your cubbards that is NON slip. (will help her in her drive)

3rd... I have let my brides drive with their cakes..6 hours before ... but they sign a release that the cake was picked up and was in acceptable condition when received and that from the point of pick up I will no longer be held responsible. (I DO THIS EVEN FOR FRIENDS)...

business is business... .friendship is friendship. All my buddies know there is a difference (wink)

mayamia Posted 13 May 2009 , 9:22pm
post #17 of 18

im sorry but can someone tell me what is sps

gailsgoodies Posted 13 May 2009 , 10:26pm
post #18 of 18

Sure, it's a Single Plate Separator. Here's a link to help you understand it:

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-603925.html

Gail

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