How To Handle Large Cakes While Stacking W/out Tearing

Decorating By J1977 Updated 13 May 2009 , 9:40pm by LisaR64

J1977 Posted 11 May 2009 , 3:10pm
post #1 of 11

Any good techniques or tutorials on how to handle large cakes 14" and over w/out tearing?

I had the bottom layer filled and had no idea how to get the top 14" out of the pan and on top of the filling w/out making a huge mess. It ended up okay but there was definately some patchwork going on.

Thanks in advance.

10 replies
cakeschmake Posted 11 May 2009 , 4:08pm
post #2 of 11

I am far from an expert but I have dealt with some large sizes like that.
I usually have my cakes either frozen or very very cold when I start to decorate.
Also you can turn it out of the pan onto a cake board then carefully slide it off of the board onto the first layer.

Hope this helps, maybe some others can give some better advice icon_smile.gif

bakingatthebeach Posted 12 May 2009 , 12:28pm
post #3 of 11

I always freeze the one thats going on top so I can lift it up and place it on easily, or, have it on a cake board, line the edge to the the edge of the bottom one, and flip it onto the filling.

leah_s Posted 12 May 2009 , 1:07pm
post #4 of 11

The cake comes out of the pan to cool on a rack.
Then it gets leveled.
Then you slide a cardboard under it and move it over to where it will be stacked.
Then pick it up and slide it on top of your bottom layer.

J1977 Posted 12 May 2009 , 1:32pm
post #5 of 11

Thanks everybody!

pattigunter Posted 12 May 2009 , 1:37pm
post #6 of 11

Wilton has come out with a cake lifter - which I have bought and used very successfully on a 14" round. Havent tried it on anything larger since I rarely make anything larger. But it works great.

eme926 Posted 12 May 2009 , 8:20pm
post #7 of 11

I use the flexible cutting boards. (I get them at the flea market 2/$1.) I probably have about 12 of them and I use them ALLLL the time. Turn the cake out on them and level it, pick up the edges of the cutting board and flip the cake over. It's just enough support that your cake doesn't split and there is NO height to it so that leveling isn't an issue. I usually use two for a large cake, lay one across the top of the pan, flip and then place another on the bottom of the cake layer and flip back. Works like a charm.

beachcakes Posted 12 May 2009 , 8:48pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakingatthebeach

I always freeze the one thats going on top so I can lift it up and place it on easily, or, have it on a cake board, line the edge to the the edge of the bottom one, and flip it onto the filling.




I do like bakingatthebeach does... maybe it's a beach thing? icon_lol.gif

J1977 Posted 13 May 2009 , 1:50pm
post #9 of 11

My scratch cakes are very moist and that is part of the problem with them wanting to tear. I'll have the cakes chilled next time and I'm confident that should do the trick!


Thanks again.

mbt4955 Posted 13 May 2009 , 9:24pm
post #10 of 11

I work full time and bake for "fun," so I almost always have to freeze my cakes -- especially wedding cakes. Since they are already frozen anyway, I go ahead and fill/crumb coat the bottom tier while frozen. No problems with them breaking and I am able to move them around to get them in the right position! icon_smile.gif

LisaR64 Posted 13 May 2009 , 9:40pm
post #11 of 11

After re-baking a 14" layer three times due to handling issues, I finally tried partially freezing it, and was able to handle it and place it on top of the other layers with no problem whatsoever.

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