Technical Question About Freezing Scratch Cakes

Decorating By Evoir Updated 11 May 2009 , 11:34pm by costumeczar

Evoir Posted 11 May 2009 , 12:45pm
post #1 of 9

I'd like to know what the benefit is exactly of freezing your scratch cakes.

I assume you bake, then tort before freezing? And is it better to wrap in cling/Saran wrap while the cake is still slightly warm and therefore sweaty?

Do you fully defrost before filling and icing?

I was curious as to the 'science' behind this technique.

Thanks in advance icon_smile.gif

8 replies
sweetpea223 Posted 11 May 2009 , 1:05pm
post #2 of 9

The benefit of freezing your cakes or any other goods, makes your cakes stay fresh. Also when you are very busy and have so much decorating to do, making the cakes ahead of time helps. You need to put it in the fridge the day before frosting at least a whole day in the fridge to thaw it out completely. You do not need to tort it before freezing... wrapping it in Saran wrap several times is the best way to keep it fresh. I would even wrap it in foil then in a ziploc bag (if I want to freeze the cake for more than a week)...this is to protect the cake from any ice frost and any smell that you have in the freezer.

Hope my explanation makes sense. Am sure you'll get a lot of feedback from other CC'ers.

Evoir Posted 11 May 2009 , 1:21pm
post #3 of 9

So freshness and making ahead are two good reasons. Thanks for your input Sweetpea icon_smile.gif

But, is there a reason you would deliberately freeze a cake JUST to improve its taste or texture? Why not just refrigerate it? What is the effect on taste/texture from freezing?

I have noticed this mentioned from time to time on CC and was wondering about the exact rationale...

jlynnw Posted 11 May 2009 , 1:32pm
post #4 of 9

It you are going to carve your cake, it is a bit easier to do with a frozen cake, as it is firmer. I like to keep my cakes wrapped like above post but in the fridge. I don't do orders or large business. I find it easier to work with a cake that is chilled.

-K8memphis Posted 11 May 2009 , 1:46pm
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evoir

So freshness and making ahead are two good reasons. Thanks for your input Sweetpea icon_smile.gif

But, is there a reason you would deliberately freeze a cake JUST to improve its taste or texture? Why not just refrigerate it? What is the effect on taste/texture from freezing?

I have noticed this mentioned from time to time on CC and was wondering about the exact rationale...




I freeze my cakes after they are torted & filled (to order)--because all the flavors meld--then all I have to is take them out, final coat and decorate. It's cleaner working, the really messy part is over with--I like that. I ice them frozen.

cricket0616 Posted 11 May 2009 , 1:57pm
post #6 of 9

K8memphis- Do you ever find that your cake sweat after icing them? I took a small cake out of the freezer for my son to decorate. I let it defrost a couple of hours on the counter still wrapped in saran wrap. The next day I noticed that the icing looked wet. I thought it happened because the cake was not fully defrosted, but you are saying that you decorate while the cake is frozen??????

-K8memphis Posted 11 May 2009 , 2:05pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by cricket0616

K8memphis- Do you ever find that your cake sweat after icing them? I took a small cake out of the freezer for my son to decorate. I let it defrost a couple of hours on the counter still wrapped in saran wrap. The next day I noticed that the icing looked wet. I thought it happened because the cake was not fully defrosted, but you are saying that you decorate while the cake is frozen??????




No because the icing I am applying is room temperature. The cake is in process of defrosting and it doesn't sweat. I return it to the frige after icing--I keep them chilled for the most part. I'm careful about maintaining gentle temperature changes--even though I ice them frozen it still doesn't have a chance to sweat.

Evoir Posted 11 May 2009 , 11:26pm
post #8 of 9

Thanks K8Memphis...thats kind of what I was wondering, about the flavours melding etc. I always carve my cakes cold too, but I might have to try freezing them already filled - never donethat before!

It had me curious as many ppl say refrigerating a scratch cake can dry it out, but freezing it apparently does not result int he same effect.

costumeczar Posted 11 May 2009 , 11:34pm
post #9 of 9

If they're iced and stored correctly they won't dry out in the fridge any faster than any other baked good. Leave a piece of bread in the fridge by itself for a while and compare it to a piece that was still wrapped in the loaf and you'll see the difference. Same thing with cakes. Wrap it right (or ice it) and you won't see a difference for a while. Store it wrong and you will.

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