D'oh!!!!!

Baking By CookieMeister Updated 14 May 2009 , 5:26am by Ruth0209

CookieMeister Posted 10 May 2009 , 10:51pm
post #1 of 19

So from the first time I tried NFSC, I've been a HUGE fan. Love the way it handles, bakes. But - the last couple of times I've been having a serious issue with it being all dry and crumbly. i've combatted it by adding an extra egg and leaving out part of the dry mixture, and while that works - it's not the same.

I figured out why today - the new glass measuring cup I had bought that I was thinking was a 6 cup, was really an 8 cup. And I had just been filling it to the top line without really reading the numbers, so I've been putting 2 extra cups of flour in it for about my last 6 batches. D'OH!!!!!!!!!

icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif

18 replies
lasidus1 Posted 10 May 2009 , 11:03pm
post #2 of 19

lol, well at least you figured it out icon_razz.gif

LesGateauxCheri Posted 10 May 2009 , 11:08pm
post #3 of 19

Haha! One time I made fondant with flour instead of powdered sugar. They look pretty similar when they are in a glass jar next to eachother on a shelf. I think we've all done something like that. icon_smile.gif

cylstrial Posted 10 May 2009 , 11:15pm
post #4 of 19

It happens to the best of us! The good thing is that you caught the mistake...so your cookies are going to start turning out better again!

weirkd Posted 10 May 2009 , 11:16pm
post #5 of 19

lol. Things we do when we are tired and working hard!! Ive made whipped cream frosting and went and spread it on the cake only to realize later that I forgot to put powdered sugar in it! I had to redo the whole thing again! What a pain in the asfault that was!!
But Ive done things like that also but with things like baking powder or forgot the salt, etc. Ghee? Why didnt my cake rise?? Tasted the same....oh yah! Forgot that little powdered stuff in the jar!!! (no not that one, the other! )

luv2bake6 Posted 10 May 2009 , 11:23pm
post #6 of 19

I've omitted the salt many times when baking breads. Wow, you'd never know what kind of a difference the salt makes when you forget to put it in.

rocketmom1985 Posted 11 May 2009 , 12:46am
post #7 of 19

Yeah, what they said...I made a cake for a fund raiser and forgot the flour...not HOW can that be? Dunno...but I did it! icon_lol.gif

CookieD-oh Posted 11 May 2009 , 12:57am
post #8 of 19

I guess you could say I've made a few careless mistakes while baking. I think my screen name says it all... icon_redface.gif

artscallion Posted 11 May 2009 , 1:00am
post #9 of 19

Glass measuring cups with lines are for measuring liquid, not flour. For dry ingredients you should use dry measure cups that you can level the ingredients off with a knife or spatula. Even better is to weigh your ingredients. Scooping and spooning flour into cups gives such varied results. Weighing will give you consistent results EVERY time.

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 11 May 2009 , 1:25am
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Glass measuring cups with lines are for measuring liquid, not flour. For dry ingredients you should use dry measure cups that you can level the ingredients off with a knife or spatula. Even better is to weigh your ingredients. Scooping and spooning flour into cups gives such varied results. Weighing will give you consistent results EVERY time.




Ya know, my husband and I have had this discussion a couple of times and I gave up trying to convince him. He does the opposite - uses the plastic measuring cups for the liquid, as well as the dry ingredients. So far it's more or less been working for him, so I've given up. lol

As for that D'oh moment: my big one came when I made a chocolate cake with a chocolate mint ganache filling and I accidentally added leaves from my basil plant instead of from my mint plant's leaves! icon_redface.gif Thank goodness it still tasted good. Here's the cake: http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=85469, if you're interested in seeing it. lol

jenlane Posted 11 May 2009 , 1:30am
post #11 of 19

so i geuss there not "no fail sugar cookies" after all! lol icon_biggrin.gif

Ruth0209 Posted 11 May 2009 , 1:41am
post #12 of 19

I made cornbread once without the baking powder. The other name for that is "hockey puck"!!! Awful.

Alagoas Posted 11 May 2009 , 2:18am
post #13 of 19

One time I used a 3/4 cup to measure 1 cup... someone used the 1 cup and forgot to put it on the bottom of the set and I just took the largest one thinking it was the 1 cup... now I ALWAYS look for the measure in cup and spoons icon_wink.gif

rhondab Posted 12 May 2009 , 2:00pm
post #14 of 19

treated myself to one of those little "shot glass" measuring cups for measuring multiple teaspoons or tablespoons of liquids. But the last batch of chocolate mug cake was really dry. That's when I really took time to see which marking is tablespoon, which is teaspoon -- makes a big diffrence !

GeminiRJ Posted 13 May 2009 , 5:29pm
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Glass measuring cups with lines are for measuring liquid, not flour. For dry ingredients you should use dry measure cups that you can level the ingredients off with a knife or spatula.




I told my sister about this once while everyone was together for dinner (she was measuring milk with the plastic cups). They all looked at me like I was a loon! Apparently I was the only one listening in 7th grade home ec. class when the teacher told us which measuring cups were used for dry and wet ingredients.

Ruth0209 Posted 13 May 2009 , 7:36pm
post #16 of 19

My mom taught me this, too, but the other day I filled my dry 1 cup measure with water and poured it into my liquid 1 cup measuring cup and it was exactly the same. I still use only dry for dry ingredients and liquid for wet ingredients, but I'm not convinced that at least for liquids it actually matters.

I can see that you don't want to use a liquid measure for dry ingredients because if you fill it to the top it's more than a cup because the liquid measures allow space so you can still pick it up and pour it.

artscallion Posted 13 May 2009 , 8:11pm
post #17 of 19

The reason you don't want to use dry cups for liquid is that liquids, because of surface tension, will not from a straight surface on top. They will form a domed top, called a meniscus. Even though you fill the cup just until the liquid reaches the edge, or lip, of the cup, the center will dome and be higher. This can result in a Tbsp or more extra liquid per cup. Liquid measuring cups avoid this by both lessening this phenomenon and allowing you to better view its effect from the side, through the glass.

While this is not always a big deal, baking IS a science. And exact consistent measurements will give you exact, consistent, expected results. I would wager that the majority of complaints on this site regarding failed cake results, or problems with scratch cakes are due to sloppy or inconsistent measuring, because box mixes don't really require the same care. (no I'm not trying to start that debate up)

As I said, cooking and decorating are arts. But baking is a science. I always weigh dry ingredients and use the correct measuring procedures for everything else. My cakes ALWAYS turn out the same, exactly as I expect them to.

cutthecake Posted 13 May 2009 , 8:21pm
post #18 of 19

Gemini,
On behalf of Home Economics Teachers everywhere, THANK YOU for listening!

Ruth0209 Posted 14 May 2009 , 5:26am
post #19 of 19

Artscallion, that is very interesting information and good to know. Fortunately, my mom taught me to be very precise in my measurements when she taught me to bake as a child, and my baking results are very consistent because of it. She applied the same standard when she taught me to sew, and it showed in the things I made. Overall, she taught me that if you're going to spend time on something it's worth taking the time to do it right.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%