Quick~Any Pastry Chef's Know The Answer??

Decorating By dailey Updated 11 May 2009 , 5:22pm by wendalynn11

dailey Posted 10 May 2009 , 1:03am
post #1 of 21

can anyone tell me why when i make pies (all-butter crust) and scones, they always bubble and seep butter?? its driving me crazy, lol! i plan on making *another* batch of scones tonight but was hoping someone can tell me what i am doing wrong first...thanks!

20 replies
favrtdtr Posted 10 May 2009 , 1:09am
post #2 of 21

check out the blog and site pastrychefonline.com - she's AWESOME and somewhere on her blog she actually talks about that - I just can't remember what she said. Good luck

-K8memphis Posted 10 May 2009 , 1:11am
post #3 of 21

I think your butter is too soft or gets too soft/warm when you're making your stuff. Butter has a ton of water in it and you gotta use it/keep it cold for those applications.

Lemme know what the pastry chef says.

MJoycake Posted 10 May 2009 , 1:22am
post #4 of 21

yes, I'm by no means a pastry expert, but I've learned that butter doughs want to be cold all the way through the process. My favorite pie recipe calls for refrigerating the whole pie for an hour before baking....both the let the dough rest again, and to re-firm the butter so it can do it's job in the dough before it has a chance to melt.

jenlane Posted 10 May 2009 , 1:27am
post #5 of 21

im wondering if the peices of butter in the dough are to big, leaving to much of a good thing in one place so it lets off to much steam and oil in one spot, does that make sense? icon_confused.gif

-K8memphis Posted 10 May 2009 , 1:34am
post #6 of 21

Is there a prize if we get it right? icon_biggrin.gif

dailey Posted 10 May 2009 , 2:32am
post #7 of 21

lol! i was gonna say the prize is one of my pies...but my pies are badddd. geeze, i have no idea where the phrase "easy as pie" comes from.

anyways, checked out the blog but couldn't find the info. i looked around the net a bit and came across a discussion where they said the oven has to be really hot or the butter seeps?? so i guess its along the same lines as you guys saying the butter is too warm? gonna try making some scones and refriderating the dough...wish me luck and thanks for responding so quickly!

costumeczar Posted 10 May 2009 , 2:42am
post #8 of 21

If you use all butter, you should keep the butter cold at all times...After you cut it into the flour refrigerate the dough for at least half an hour before you roll it out. That will give the butter time to firm up and will also let the flour absorb moisture so that it will roll out better. After you roll it out, refrigerate it again before you bake it. That will also keep it from shrinking as much. Make sure the oven temp is where it should be, not just warming up.

You can also use half and half butter and shortening to reduce the seepage.

sweetiesbykim Posted 10 May 2009 , 2:50am
post #9 of 21

Same thing happened to me -croissants in Louisiana in August! They were sitting in a pool of melted butter before they were even in the oven icon_sad.gif I was only 17, so I chalk it up to an embarrassing dose of experience.

The butter and the entire item has to be ice cold, as everyone stated above AND your oven has to be hot -definitely 375-400F or above. In a slow oven, even with cold butter pieces, it will slowly melt. To create the flakiness, the little butter pieces need to quickly evaporate the water to create a burst of steam, which makes those little air pockets in crust, scones, etc. I mix, refrigerate, roll, refrigerate, form, refrigerate, fill pie, refrigerate. My aunt (making lard crusts) used to roll and form hers in pie tins, then wrap and freeze them until she needed them for an order. Then, just fill and bake while the crust was still frozen. They were always perfectly flaky icon_smile.gif

costumeczar Posted 10 May 2009 , 2:57am
post #10 of 21

Lard will definitely give you a flakier crust than butter, too. I made cinnamon rolls with lard for a brunch once, and everyone said they were the best they'd ever had, and how had I made them?? I told them they didn't want to know, ha ha ha! icon_razz.gif Lard...lard...lard...The word just sounds gross, but it does make a flaky crust!

sweetiesbykim Posted 10 May 2009 , 3:32am
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Lard will definitely give you a flakier crust than butter, too. I made cinnamon rolls with lard for a brunch once, and everyone said they were the best they'd ever had, and how had I made them?? I told them they didn't want to know, ha ha ha! icon_razz.gif Lard...lard...lard...The word just sounds gross, but it does make a flaky crust!




Oh, so good!! My mom's favorite cookies as a girl was "Lard Cookies". I found a recipe online -basically a molasses spice roll-out dough with lard, for flavor and texture she said. I haven't made them yet, but it's at the top of my list for Christmas!
I can't wait until my first strawberry-rhubarb pie of the season coming soon -lard crust, of course icon_razz.gif

favrtdtr Posted 10 May 2009 , 3:47am
post #12 of 21

so sorry the blog didn't help - i went and re read it and she did talk about making sure everything was ice cold and to not over mix

luvsfreebies72 Posted 10 May 2009 , 6:58am
post #13 of 21
dailey Posted 10 May 2009 , 5:49pm
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by favrtdtr

so sorry the blog didn't help - i went and re read it and she did talk about making sure everything was ice cold and to not over mix




no problem! its a neat site, thanks for the info : )

luvsfreebies, thanks for the link!

-K8memphis Posted 10 May 2009 , 5:55pm
post #15 of 21

So what flavor pies do we get to choose from???

icon_biggrin.gif

lilscakes Posted 10 May 2009 , 5:55pm
post #16 of 21

keep your butter "super" cold when adding it to the flour. I used a cheese grater to cut it into the flour and handle as little as possible. Refrigerate the dough to get it nice and cold again before rolling. I use this method when making baking powder biscuits and they rise and are the flakiest ever. Good luck with it...

Cheyanne25 Posted 10 May 2009 , 5:56pm
post #17 of 21

My pastry chef from Culinary school stressed keeping everything cool the whole length of the process. Use frozen butter/lard if you can, and a great trick to getting it the right size: use a cheese grater and chill it down again after you've grated it. But definitely make sure you chill the pie down after having formed it before you bake it.

Hope this helps.

-K8memphis Posted 10 May 2009 , 5:59pm
post #18 of 21

Here's another dealio about biscuits & scones--if you want them to rise the best use a sharp cutter to cut them out.

That's gotta be worth two flavors now icon_biggrin.gif

I'm going with fudge and can't decide, no I got it blueberry (from fresh bberries)

Hey, Dailey-ness, I was just up there last week--drove up for my bro's 60th surprise b-day party in Schererville.

snarkybaker Posted 10 May 2009 , 6:12pm
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by dailey

can anyone tell me why when i make pies (all-butter crust) and scones, they always bubble and seep butter?? its driving me crazy, lol! i plan on making *another* batch of scones tonight but was hoping someone can tell me what i am doing wrong first...thanks!




If you use a scone recipe that has less butter and some heavy cream, the dough is less fussy. We make a couple hundred scones a week and we constantly get people who tell us these are the best scones they've ever had.

Carole Walters has a really good recipe for cream scones in her " Great Sticky Buns" book, but this one from Cook's illustrated is pretty good too. Just sub 1/4 cake flour with your all pourpose to get the " low protein" type they specify.

http://obsessedwithbaking.blogspot.com/2009/04/cream-scones-cranberry-orange.html

dailey Posted 11 May 2009 , 5:13pm
post #20 of 21

thanks again everyone!!! so many great tips for next time. icon_smile.gif and i definitely NEED them, the pies turned out HORRIBLE! the crust on the blueberry pie was tough and chewy, you couldn't even cut it with the fork. and the apple pie crust was soggy and flavorless??? ugh. straight into the garbage they went. i wanted to give them to the dog but my dad couldn't believe i would be so cruel, lol!

hey kate, your were a hop, skip and a jump away from me here in CP! where did you all go to celebrate? i think Tieble's (sp?) is still pretty popular in schererville.

wendalynn11 Posted 11 May 2009 , 5:22pm
post #21 of 21

I also have a recipe that used some vodka for the liquid in the pie dough recipe. It makes a very light , flaky dough that is very easy to work with.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%