Flower Experts, How Do I Add Color?

Decorating By Rylan Updated 17 May 2009 , 5:35pm by tonedna

Rylan Posted 8 May 2009 , 11:01pm
post #1 of 22

I was looking for flowers here on CC and I saw these:

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules/coppermine/albums/userpics/62312/normal_Email_Dutch_Tulip_3.jpg

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules/coppermine/albums/userpics/535223/resizedcake.JPG

As you can see, the colors flowers are not flat. I am not sure how to achive the realistic look.

Do I start with a white flower or a yellow? How am I supposed to blend in two different colors? I only have the FDA approved dusts, is it good to use to color flowers? Do I finish making the flower and then apply the dusts or do I apply the dust before I assmble the petals? How can I make the colors even and look clean. Do I dry brush or mix it with vodka. Did they hover the tulip over a boiling water? Any tips are also welcome

I hope someone can help, THANKS.

21 replies
Rylan Posted 9 May 2009 , 12:04am
post #2 of 22

anyone?

sweetjan Posted 9 May 2009 , 12:09am
post #3 of 22

You can pm sugarflowers (Michele Foster) or sugarshack (Sharon Zambito) or toneda (Edna)....they are all experts in this and all 3 of them are excellent, willing teachers. I'd help you if I knew exactly how... icon_redface.gif
hth!!

tonedna Posted 9 May 2009 , 12:09am
post #4 of 22

It depends ont what you are trying to achieve. I sometimes start with a base color and then add powders to give the flowers some hues.. You can use an airbrush. Some people use the vodka, but I dont love it like that. I prefer starting with a base color.. For me is less work.
Edna icon_smile.gif

tonedna Posted 9 May 2009 , 12:12am
post #5 of 22

As for shades in roses.. you can apply as you go...Look at roses most of them have darker centers and the get lighter as you go. You can use non toxic chalks to paint your flowers too.
Flowers dont have flat colors..they have hues..
The roses below are done in one flat color with barely any hues in it..
The Orchids are just dusted in peach and the darker color is gel color with vodka handpainted with a brush.
Edna icon_smile.gif
LL
LL

Rylan Posted 9 May 2009 , 3:20am
post #6 of 22

Thanks sweetjan for the info, I'm glad you are willing to help.

Edna, thanks a lot for the help! I have no idea where you get the time to help people like me =] You are so helpful. I'm glad you are not one of theose stuck up decorators in here who acts like they are so up there. You are one professional who has a heart for unexperienced people like me. THANKS.

tonedna Posted 9 May 2009 , 3:58am
post #7 of 22

That's cause I was just like you and I haven't forgotten..
Edna icon_smile.gif

Cathy26 Posted 9 May 2009 , 8:28am
post #8 of 22

i use sugarflair blossom tints dusting powders and they work great. i used egg yellow, tangerine and forest green and nutkin brown for the picture below and it really made such a difference to the filler flowers and the sunflowers. i dusted the powders on with a small brush dry.
LL

SheepThrills Posted 12 May 2009 , 7:33pm
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by RylanTy

Thanks sweetjan for the info, I'm glad you are willing to help.

Edna, thanks a lot for the help! I have no idea where you get the time to help people like me =] You are so helpful. I'm glad you are not one of theose stuck up decorators in here who acts like they are so up there. You are one professional who has a heart for unexperienced people like me. THANKS.




This seems a bit out of line. Did it ever occur to you that the so-called stuck up decorators didn't see this post or they haven't been on CC for a while due to other responsibilities? How many questions have YOU answered or NOT answered? Do you happen to miss a post or two? If there is a question in which you can answer and choose to not based on lack of time, does that make YOU stuck up?

Anyway, one way to get good depth of color is to start with a very pale version of the final flower and then dust each petal before it is attached or while the paste is still soft. This helps to prevent color going to places you don't want it. Color can be added after the petals are dry, but there is a possibility of breakages and uneven coloring.

No longer stuck up, I guess.

Diane

Rylan Posted 15 May 2009 , 6:50pm
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SheepThrills

Quote:
Originally Posted by RylanTy

Thanks sweetjan for the info, I'm glad you are willing to help.

Edna, thanks a lot for the help! I have no idea where you get the time to help people like me =] You are so helpful. I'm glad you are not one of theose stuck up decorators in here who acts like they are so up there. You are one professional who has a heart for unexperienced people like me. THANKS.



This seems a bit out of line. Did it ever occur to you that the so-called stuck up decorators didn't see this post or they haven't been on CC for a while due to other responsibilities? How many questions have YOU answered or NOT answered? Do you happen to miss a post or two? If there is a question in which you can answer and choose to not based on lack of time, does that make YOU stuck up?

Anyway, one way to get good depth of color is to start with a very pale version of the final flower and then dust each petal before it is attached or while the paste is still soft. This helps to prevent color going to places you don't want it. Color can be added after the petals are dry, but there is a possibility of breakages and uneven coloring.

No longer stuck up, I guess.

Diane


Diane, did I EVER mention that the "stuck up decorators" I'm reffering to are the people who didn't answer my question? Did I EVER mention that the stuck up decorators I'm talking about are the people who probably missed my post? And did I EVEN EVER mention that the stuck up decorators are even from CakeCentral?

The answer is no. I actually knew Edna before I even joined CakeCentral. So Honey, I would suggest you re-read my post before you start assuming things because I'm totally not in the mood to explain what I mean about stuck up decorators.

Other than that, THANKS for the tip on the flowers.

Oh and Cathy, THANKS for the tip also! Those flowers are beautiful!

Cakepro Posted 15 May 2009 , 7:08pm
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by RylanTy

I'm glad you are not one of theose stuck up decorators in here who acts like they are so up there. You are one professional who has a heart for unexperienced people like me. THANKS.




Wow, with inflammatory comments like that (and this was not your first comment along those lines), is it any wonder that people aren't clearing their calendars to sit down and answer your questions?

Your answers could have been found just by doing a search on "dusting gumpaste" or similar. I just did the same exact search and there were more than 3 pages of topics on this subject. It gets really old answering the same questions over and over and over again. Have you considered that?

You should be grateful for the help you receive and not EXPECT it. Just my Image.

Here is just one thread of many on the topic of dusting gumpaste flowers: http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-581243-dusting.html+gumpaste

vicky Posted 16 May 2009 , 1:58am
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

As for shades in roses.. you can apply as you go...Look at roses most of them have darker centers and the get lighter as you go. You can use non toxic chalks to paint your flowers too.
Flowers dont have flat colors..they have hues..
The roses below are done in one flat color with barely any hues in it..
The Orchids are just dusted in peach and the darker color is gel color with vodka handpainted with a brush.
Edna icon_smile.gif




Your flowers are gorgeous!!
I have 2 questions; do you scrape the color from the chalks into the vodka, and you mention gel colors with vodka, I've mixed the luster dusts and other dusts with vodka to get a very nice color, you use gel with vodka to get good results? icon_confused.gif I also steam them slightly after they dry to make the color intense.

I learn something everytime I read this site!! icon_biggrin.gif Thanks for the info.

bananabread Posted 16 May 2009 , 7:04am
post #13 of 22

Hi, you apply the chalk colors dry, when you use gel colors you use vodka.

When you use chalk, you can use peal dust to make your flowers look like real.
Pearl dust produces a shimmery luster. Use super pearl on flowers made from colored gum paste for a glistening look. When dusted on white petals, the other pearls in the range exhibit a subtle translucent or iridescent reflective colored sheen while displaying no apparent or strong color. They may be combined or applied over Petal dust to create custom colors or effects. Contains Titanium Dioxide and Mica. Not water soluble.

  http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1355170.html

the white and pink rose I use chak color and pearl dust, for the red rose I use red gel and vodka. For the leaves only red chalk

Rylan Posted 16 May 2009 , 11:54am
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Quote:
Originally Posted by RylanTy

I'm glad you are not one of theose stuck up decorators in here who acts like they are so up there. You are one professional who has a heart for unexperienced people like me. THANKS.



Wow, with inflammatory comments like that (and this was not your first comment along those lines), is it any wonder that people aren't clearing their calendars to sit down and answer your questions?

Your answers could have been found just by doing a search on "dusting gumpaste" or similar. I just did the same exact search and there were more than 3 pages of topics on this subject. It gets really old answering the same questions over and over and over again. Have you considered that?

You should be grateful for the help you receive and not EXPECT it. Just my Image.

Here is just one thread of many on the topic of dusting gumpaste flowers: http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-581243-dusting.html+gumpaste




Uh I am grateful for the help I recieve, who said I wansn't. I've also done research ang I HAVE read different ways on doing so. But you know what? I wanted to hear from people because I was being specific. Not all threads provide a picture. Honestly, how many ways can you add color to a flower? MANY ways right? I provided a picture that I clearly wanted to achieve and I wanted to know the best way to do so. Sure there are other threads but they don't have the exact question I have. Maybe they do but I cannot picture what they are reffering to so HERE I AM POSTING A THREAD ABOUT THIS.

Gosh I really so did not expect as simple comments stating "stuck up decorators" can be such a huge problem. I did not even refer to someone from CakeCentral or people not answering my questions. Ah gosh people nowadays.

vicky Posted 16 May 2009 , 1:20pm
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by bananabread

Hi, you apply the chalk colors dry, when you use gel colors you use vodka.

When you use chalk, you can use peal dust to make your flowers look like real.
Pearl dust produces a shimmery luster. Use super pearl on flowers made from colored gum paste for a glistening look. When dusted on white petals, the other pearls in the range exhibit a subtle translucent or iridescent reflective colored sheen while displaying no apparent or strong color. They may be combined or applied over Petal dust to create custom colors or effects. Contains Titanium Dioxide and Mica. Not water soluble.

  http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1355170.html

the white and pink rose I use chak color and pearl dust, for the red rose I use red gel and vodka. For the leaves only red chalk





When you use chalk, do you just brush off the chalk, or do you have to ground it into powder? THank you for all the great information.

crisseyann Posted 16 May 2009 , 4:13pm
post #16 of 22

I have used the small holes on a metal grater or tea strainer to turn my non-toxic chalk into powder and then dry-brush it onto flowers.

vicky Posted 16 May 2009 , 6:17pm
post #17 of 22

Thank you!! icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

artscallion Posted 16 May 2009 , 6:38pm
post #18 of 22

When I'm making flowers that are naturally darker in the center, like roses, I color the gum paste, make the inner set of petals, then add some extra white gum paste to the leftover, already colored stuff to lighten it for the next row of petals. I keep repeating this so the petals naturally get lighter as I work towards the outside.

I will also use non-toxic pastel chalks, grated in a tea strainer to make a dust. I brush this on to add touches of variety to the roses I have described above. If the rose is pink, for instance, I may brush a subtle bit of yellow here and there, maybe just around the bases of some of the petals. Or I will just deepen some of the pink, here and there. This adds a nice depth and realism. Flowers usually are not one flat color. They naturally vary in both value and hue.

Then I will hold them in the steam of a tea kettle for two seconds to set the chalk.

JenniferMI Posted 16 May 2009 , 6:48pm
post #19 of 22

I often use a combination of dusts to achieve the look I want. With the tulip Rylan, it would be very easy to dust that after it's dry, unless you want to dust the inside of the petals. If it is difficult to dust after it's dry, sure you can dust while it's wet. I usually start out with a paler version of what I am going to have in the end, so a pale orange for the tulip. Then I would use a fern (LUV that mossy color) at the base and a bit up the central outer vein. Dust your shade of orange and hit the very edges with a darker version, this will add some depth. The very petaly flower...now that one you might want to dust as your go or if the outer petals are wired, you can dust those before putting them on.

Petal dusts are totally awesome! They will bring your flowers to life. Without dusting, gumpaste looks plastic. I dust, then dip all my foliage...love the way that looks... kicks them up a notch icon_smile.gif

If you have any other questions, you know I am happy to try and help you.

Sweet regards,

Jennifer icon_smile.gif
LL

JenniferMI Posted 16 May 2009 , 7:03pm
post #20 of 22

Here's another example of dusted flowers... without dusting... no realism.

Jen icon_smile.gif
PS - You also can go to the hobby stores and get artist chalks...you can finely grate your own. Make sure they are NON toxic and NO oil base. The oil base will not grate (been there, done that icon_smile.gif BUT, with that being said, the pallett does have some wonderful shades, but I mainly use it to get custom colors for my petal dusts. Adding a little of this and a little of that to my brand names. Make sure it's non-toxic, very important.
LL

Rylan Posted 16 May 2009 , 7:56pm
post #21 of 22

Thanks everyone for continuing to help. I should definitely consider chalks. Btw Jennifer, those flowers are amazing! I wanted to achieve that peony look.

Btw, about the complaints about my thread. Sorry if I mentioned that there are stuck up decorators "in here". I didn't realize I said "in here" (Thanks Pam for pointing that out). But whatever, why would that be the highlight of the thread? Atleast I'm glad people stopped pointing that out.

THANKS EVERYONE!

tonedna Posted 17 May 2009 , 5:35pm
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by vicky

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

As for shades in roses.. you can apply as you go...Look at roses most of them have darker centers and the get lighter as you go. You can use non toxic chalks to paint your flowers too.
Flowers dont have flat colors..they have hues..
The roses below are done in one flat color with barely any hues in it..
The Orchids are just dusted in peach and the darker color is gel color with vodka handpainted with a brush.
Edna icon_smile.gif



Your flowers are gorgeous!!
I have 2 questions; do you scrape the color from the chalks into the vodka, and you mention gel colors with vodka, I've mixed the luster dusts and other dusts with vodka to get a very nice color, you use gel with vodka to get good results? icon_confused.gif I also steam them slightly after they dry to make the color intense.

I learn something everytime I read this site!! icon_biggrin.gif Thanks for the info.





Thanks for the complement.. You just grate the chalks and make a fine dust and use it dry like a luster dust, Vodka is not necessary. I use the chalks more for tone on tone.
Edna icon_smile.gif

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