How Do I Tort A Cake?

Decorating By rlc23 Updated 21 May 2009 , 1:46am by rlc23

rlc23 Posted 7 May 2009 , 1:44am
post #1 of 10

I always want to get more frosting between layers, but it seems like the frosting always squishes out and makes the sides lumpy. I keep seeing posters refer to torting, so I'm wondering if thats a way to get more frosting between the layers without the squish problem??

9 replies
crazygravy Posted 7 May 2009 , 1:49am
post #2 of 10
Ruth0209 Posted 7 May 2009 , 1:58am
post #3 of 10

Torting is when you cut each layer through hoizontally and add filling as well as between the two layers. So if you bake two cakes, you end up with three layers of filling instead of just one. I like torting because you can add more filling, but in a bit smaller amount. It makes the cake very pretty when you cut it, and you get a nice balance of cake and filling. Makes the cake a little taller, too.

Ruth0209 Posted 7 May 2009 , 1:59am
post #4 of 10

Torting is when you cut each layer through hoizontally and add filling as well as between the two layers. So if you bake two cakes, you end up with three layers of filling instead of just one. I like torting because you can add more filling, but in a bit smaller amount. It makes the cake very pretty when you cut it, and you get a nice balance of cake and filling. Makes the cake a little taller, too.

sandsher Posted 7 May 2009 , 1:40pm
post #5 of 10

I have never torted my cakes, but I want to try it. Isn't it hard to get the filling in the layers where you cut it with all the crumbs? It just seems like it would be a big mess. I want to do it for the Mother's Day cake I am making, but still not sure. Thanks!

Ruth0209 Posted 7 May 2009 , 2:23pm
post #6 of 10

If you chill your cakes before you torte them, they'll be easier to cut and you'll have fewer crumbs. Then you just fill them the same way you would any cake. A few crumbs while you spread the filling won't hurt anything. It's worth the final result.

I recommend that you buy the cheap Wilton wire leveler/cutter. Some people don't like it, but mine has always worked well. You put it on the side of the cake then slide it back and forth through the cake and your cut will be level. When you get to the other side, put your hand on the side of the cake and carefully let the wire come out between your fingers. That will keep the wire from tearing a chunk out of the cake on the side.

You can use a giant bread knife, but I have a hard time keeping it level. And your torte needs to be as level as the top. If the side of your cake is crusty, just put a sharp knife level with the wire and cut into the cake a little to get it started. It's really not hard.

sandsher Posted 7 May 2009 , 3:16pm
post #7 of 10

I really appreciate that. You make it sound really easy. I think I will try it. I'll bet it is really pretty when cut. I did have one of the levelers, but lost all my cake supplies in a house fire. I am having to start all over and buy everything and I haven't bought another one yet, but I definitely will. Thanks so much for your help!

lomikesa Posted 7 May 2009 , 3:35pm
post #8 of 10

I use dental floss to tort my cakes it is the best, since I started doing this I stopped using the wilton torter, just make sure you first mark it all around it and it is not messy.

Lomikesa

sandsher Posted 7 May 2009 , 5:35pm
post #9 of 10

That is different. I appreciate you letting me know. I love finding out all the different tips people have about what they use and how they use things. I really want to do this for the cake I am doing for Mother's Day. Hopefully it will turn out good. Thanks!

rlc23 Posted 21 May 2009 , 1:46am
post #10 of 10

Thanks for the help! I couldn't find this topic once I posted it. icon_smile.gif But now that I've read the replies, I'm going to try it on the cake I'm making this weekend.

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