What Do You Use As Filling?

Decorating By cakes22 Updated 9 May 2009 , 8:45pm by sugarspice

cakes22 Posted 6 May 2009 , 2:20pm
post #1 of 30

I was wondering what type of fruit filling most of you use? And can you use pie filling as a fruit filling in between layers, using a dam to hold it? or is it better to use a jam? I have used raspberry & blueberry jam, but now that we are getting into the summer, I would like to use some different fillings.

tia icon_smile.gif

29 replies
AverageMom Posted 6 May 2009 , 4:58pm
post #2 of 30

I used the Ultimate Pina Colada recipe for a filling, and it was absolutely divine! Most people wanted to just eat the filling that day!

goldenegg Posted 6 May 2009 , 5:04pm
post #3 of 30

i use the sleeves, they taste yummy, don't require refrigeration, have a good consistency, not to mention super convenient, fairly cheap too, you can get em from various cake supply stores online, they come in all flavors and even different Bavarian cremes. icon_biggrin.gif

Rylan Posted 6 May 2009 , 5:09pm
post #4 of 30

I've used raspberry preserves and rasberry preserves mixed with buttercream. Yes a dam is always a must. I would suggest the sleeves someone just talked about.

crazycakes2007 Posted 6 May 2009 , 5:10pm
post #5 of 30

I like to blend fresh raspberries into homemade vanilla custard, then fold in stiff whipped cream. Brush your cake with raspberry liquer... so good! I suppose that woud work well with peaches or blueberries too. Also, homemade applesauce goes great with a spice cake.

crazygravy Posted 6 May 2009 , 5:11pm
post #6 of 30

can someone please clarify what a dam is? Is it just a build up of outer icing along the edges? sorry if this is a silly question.

ThreeDGirlie Posted 6 May 2009 , 5:11pm
post #7 of 30

I've made the "raspberry puree filling" recipe on here, and it's delicious!

I made strawberry puree by subbing strawberries for the raspberries (duh) and using Grand Marnier instead of Chambord. I like that one even better!

Rylan Posted 6 May 2009 , 5:17pm
post #8 of 30

A dam is a really thick buttercream. Thick enough to be rolled with two hands.

fabulosity Posted 6 May 2009 , 5:18pm
post #9 of 30

Great that this came up...I have a question to.

I am making a orange tangerine cake and they want orange marmalade as the filling. Do I put that right on the bottom cake with a dam of buttercream? I have never done something like this and would die if it was all mushy when they cut into it! icon_redface.gif

artscallion Posted 6 May 2009 , 5:21pm
post #10 of 30

I mix jam, preserves or citrus curds with buttercream. The flavor I use depends on the cake it's in. Two of my favorite combos are almond cake cake with sour cherry jam/buttercream... and almond cake with ginger preserves/buttercream. (My almond cake is Colette Peter's white cake recipe with tsp almond extract added to the already called for vanilla, plus 1/2 cup almond paste added to the butter/sugar creaming process.)

If it's a torted cake, I use these fillings between the top and bottom layers with spackle (a mixture of the filling/buttercream and cake crumbs from the trimming process) between the center layers.

PTBUGZY1 Posted 6 May 2009 , 5:26pm
post #11 of 30

I have not heard of "sleeves" what is that?

thanks bugz icon_biggrin.gif

AverageMom Posted 6 May 2009 , 6:01pm
post #12 of 30

I'm wondering, too, what sleeves are.

crazygravy Posted 6 May 2009 , 6:39pm
post #13 of 30

I can answer the sleeve questions...at my local bake supply shop they sell a "sleeve" (a triangular shaped sealed ziploc looking bag) filled with creams or preserves like mixtures. I've seen strawberry, raspberry, blueberry, etc.

PinkZiab Posted 6 May 2009 , 7:01pm
post #14 of 30

I make all of my fillings from scratch, but I often use what would be considered a pie filling to fill a cake. I like using fresh fruit compote, jams/preserves, fruit creams... almost anything you can imagine... I love to experiment and try new flavors. Don't get stuck in a rut with the same old fillings!

Rylan Posted 6 May 2009 , 7:40pm
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by fabulosity

Great that this came up...I have a question to.

I am making a orange tangerine cake and they want orange marmalade as the filling. Do I put that right on the bottom cake with a dam of buttercream? I have never done something like this and would die if it was all mushy when they cut into it! icon_redface.gif




What to do mean right on the bottom cake?

I've done using a marmalade on chocolate cake (I didn't like it) and it turned out a little bit soggy.

jdelaney81 Posted 6 May 2009 , 8:16pm
post #16 of 30

I also have a question (don't mean to hijack...) what is the ratio of butter cream to jam/preserves? I did it once, had a real nice thick dam, and when I put the top layer of cake on, it all started seeping out the sides. In fact, the top layer actually started sliding off! I have never tried that type of filling again. Thanks for any help.

artscallion Posted 6 May 2009 , 9:34pm
post #17 of 30

I don't really measure. But I'd say 1 part jam to 2 parts buttercream is usually around what I do.

To make the dam, I take some of the buttercream I'm using to frost and add a good amount of PS to it to make it really stiff. I mean so stiff that just the act of piping it around the cake pushes the cake around on the turntable itself. I don't even have to spin the cake by hand.

I pipe the dam with a #12 plain round tip 1/3" away from the edge of the cake. This way, when the cake settles and the filling is pushed out towards the sides, it still has a good way to go before it could spill out the sides.

I also only use enough filling to come about 3/4 up the side of the dam. This way, even if the dam settles a little, the cake above still has a bit to go before it would really start putting pressure on the lower filled center.

I find this is the right combination of circumstances to have me end up with good even layer from center to edge, with no overflow or bulge. I always do it this way and if you look at my pictures you can see that there's not a sign of bulge on any of them.

kjgjam22 Posted 6 May 2009 , 11:37pm
post #18 of 30

i make this white cake....i put lemon curd in the middle. its sooo nice. i make the lemon curd myself.

Michellers Posted 6 May 2009 , 11:44pm
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjgjam22

i make this white cake....i put lemon curd in the middle. its sooo nice. i make the lemon curd myself.




mmmmm...that's my new favorite! I make the wasc with homemade lemon curd filling. It's delicious!

FlourPots Posted 7 May 2009 , 12:12am
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by AverageMom

I used the Ultimate Pina Colada recipe for a filling, and it was absolutely divine! Most people wanted to just eat the filling that day!




Is this the recipe you meant? http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-7310-ultimate-pina-colada.html

If so, did you alter it in any way or did you make it as written?

BTW, Macsmom has a great tip about making a dam...she adds BC to crumbled cake scraps and uses the thickened mixture for her dams.

fabulosity Posted 7 May 2009 , 3:14pm
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by RylanTy

Quote:
Originally Posted by fabulosity

Great that this came up...I have a question to.

I am making a orange tangerine cake and they want orange marmalade as the filling. Do I put that right on the bottom cake with a dam of buttercream? I have never done something like this and would die if it was all mushy when they cut into it! icon_redface.gif



What to do mean right on the bottom cake?

I've done using a marmalade on chocolate cake (I didn't like it) and it turned out a little bit soggy.





First off, I am a bad describer. But I mean, do you just use the filling, or marmalade in my case, in between the cake layers. Or do you put buttercream between the filling and the cake so that it does not soak up all the juices from the filling? Or just put the filling in there with a dam so that it does not leak out the sides. I am so super terrified of a mushy cake. icon_confused.gif

Stephi1 Posted 7 May 2009 , 3:27pm
post #22 of 30

I think what you are asking is if you should put a layer of buttercream before you put on the marmalade to keep it from making the cake soggy. That would be perfectly fine. I have done fruit fillings both ways and both turn out.

Peridot Posted 7 May 2009 , 3:28pm
post #23 of 30

I had the same problem with adding BC and jam - used a dam and did it the way I was supposed to. When I cut the cake - ugh!! All of the filling seeped out and the cake started to slide - it just kept oozing out until it ran its course. What a mess. So I have never done that again either. I am assuming that I had too much jam. But it tasted great!

artscallion Posted 7 May 2009 , 4:26pm
post #24 of 30

I should clarify that when I say I use jam and buttercream between a layer, I don't mean that I spread buttercream on and then spread jam on top of that. What I do is mix buttercream and jam together until smooth and then use the resulting mixture as a filling. I've never had any problems with slippage doing this.

fabulosity Posted 7 May 2009 , 5:41pm
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

I should clarify that when I say I use jam and buttercream between a layer, I don't mean that I spread buttercream on and then spread jam on top of that. What I do is mix buttercream and jam together until smooth and then use the resulting mixture as a filling. I've never had any problems with slippage doing this.




THAT is a fabulous idea! thumbs_up.gif

When I use something other than buttercream it's like the cake version of the leaning tower of Pisa...just bad. thumbsdown.gif

Pebbles1727 Posted 8 May 2009 , 12:11am
post #26 of 30

What brands of sleeved filling do you guys prefer?
P

momg9 Posted 8 May 2009 , 12:25am
post #27 of 30

Has anyone used the cream cheese filling in the sleeve? If so, does it have to be refrigerated?

Jannie92869 Posted 8 May 2009 , 1:24am
post #28 of 30

Quick Question on the same topic:

Customer wants a torted white cake with a layer of rasberry, layer of cake, layer of chocolate ganache, layer of cake.

I was going to use raspberry jam....I didn't really want to mix it with the buttercream because she wants it to stay red. Would I need to put down a light layer of buttercream first?

Also with the chocolate ganache....I've only used it as a drizzle type topping before...would I just need to let it sit a while to use it as a filling?

Thanks for your help.

tammi Posted 9 May 2009 , 6:28pm
post #29 of 30

Hi Jannie,

You can use a thin layer of raspberry jam on each layer topped with the ganache. And for the ganache, just refrigerate it, then let it sit on the counter for a few minutes then whip it to make it fluffy. Then you can spread it onto your layer.

Take Care,
Tamara

sugarspice Posted 9 May 2009 , 8:45pm
post #30 of 30

another filling question. I did a trial of raspberry filling using seedless raspberry preserves-it was for some samples I was giving out at a booth. I put down a thin layer of buttercream, then the preserves (had a good, stiff dam) and then the next layer & iced the whole thing in buttercream. It was very good, looked pretty, no oozing & got great compliments!
BUT...
The next day, I ate one of the samples and noticed the preserves had started to be absorbed into the "top" layer of the cake in the tier-so it wasn't a pretty red layer any longer & a bit mushy.

I am wondering-if I did this for a wedding cake-which would definately sit 2 days before serving, how would I maintain a nice, red, filling or would it mostly be absorbed by the cake by then??!! I know mixing w/ buttcream would be an option-but want to be prepared for the bride that wants straight fruit filling

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