Disassembling Imbc Or Smbc Covered Tiered Cakes For Cutting

Decorating By cakeymom Updated 8 May 2009 , 7:41am by soygurl

cakeymom Posted 5 May 2009 , 1:42pm
post #1 of 17

Since IMBC and SMBC is so light and does not crust how do I get the tiered cakes apart to cut without having the BC get messed up???

cakeymom

16 replies
__Jamie__ Posted 5 May 2009 , 3:14pm
post #2 of 17

Thru trial and error did I learn this. Elevate them ever so slightly, so they are just barely touching. Probably best to use a small border to hide the space if you end up with one. A parchment circle on top of the tier you are stacking another cake on will help too.

drakegore Posted 5 May 2009 , 3:32pm
post #3 of 17

i've been having this same problem...
jamie,
if you are elevating are using a plate and pillar system instead of dowels/cake round alone?
thanks,
diane

__Jamie__ Posted 5 May 2009 , 3:35pm
post #4 of 17

I use SPS for fondant cakes, so no issue there. SMBC cakes, I use bubble straws and a dowel down the middle (sometimes). Then, I can cut them really close with a pair of thin scissors, check level, etc., then I am right down as close as possible without tearing up the icing afterwards. Always on foam core with press and seal also, no cake rounds used here!

__Jamie__ Posted 5 May 2009 , 3:42pm
post #5 of 17

I use a sewing ruler to check the depth of the tier, as seen in Sugarshack Stacking video...like $4 at Michaels/Joans....VERY handy tool!

cakeymom Posted 5 May 2009 , 3:49pm
post #6 of 17

Ok, what's foam core???? And can bubble straws be purchased some where locally in all cities or just via the web????

cakeymom

P.S. - Thanks for the responses thus far!!!!!

__Jamie__ Posted 5 May 2009 , 4:14pm
post #7 of 17

Foam core...Michaels, several sizes, you cut to shape with razor or hot knife. Bubble straws I get online, usually from Amazon of Boba Direct.

cakeymom Posted 5 May 2009 , 4:16pm
post #8 of 17

Is this what you use when arranging artifical flowers????

__Jamie__ Posted 5 May 2009 , 4:21pm
post #9 of 17

No...that is foam. Foam core is paper with foam sandwiched in between it. Very sturdy, very lightweight. Sold in sheets.

drakegore Posted 5 May 2009 , 4:23pm
post #10 of 17

hi jamie,
thank you for the information! if your foam core board/cake are slightly elevated, how do you keep it from being a little unstable? do you assemble on site?
thanks!
diane

__Jamie__ Posted 5 May 2009 , 4:35pm
post #11 of 17

I don't assemble on site. Too many opportunities for something to go wrong. They aren't so elevated that they are moving around, they are slightly ever so much touching, and then the parchment round keeps the icing down. Plus, if they are three tiers or over, then a wooden dowel goes thru the whole thing, and I transport very carefully.

cakeymom Posted 5 May 2009 , 4:52pm
post #12 of 17

Thanks for explaining that icon_wink.gif



cakeymom

soygurl Posted 6 May 2009 , 5:38am
post #13 of 17

Just curious... Jamie, why do you only use SPS for fondant cakes and not all your cakes? icon_confused.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 6 May 2009 , 2:59pm
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by soygurl

Just curious... Jamie, why do you only use SPS for fondant cakes and not all your cakes? icon_confused.gif




I didn't mean only for fondant, and in fact that was worded not so great. I occasionally use SPS for various cakes. Sometimes I don't trust the weight of a fondant cake to bubble straws, and will go to SPS. Sometimes I don't trust it for SMBC either, so SPS I go....and weird as this may sound, I have a much easier time getting the tiers 4" tall for the SPS with fondant, as opposed to levelling off the icing on a BC cake to get to the required 4". I don't know, I just do.

soygurl Posted 7 May 2009 , 7:40am
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

....and weird as this may sound, I have a much easier time getting the tiers 4" tall for the SPS with fondant, as opposed to levelling off the icing on a BC cake to get to the required 4". I don't know, I just do.




I can totally understand how it would be easier to get a certain height with fondant cakes! icon_wink.gif
I use SPS for all my stacked cakes, and some pillared cakes (can't figure out a way for people picking up/transporting their own cakes to use SPS pillars), but I cut the 9" pillars to size for each cake I do instead of making my cakes all 4" high.
But anyway, it sounds like you just use SPS for bigger or "more risky" cakes. I get it. icon_cool.gif

CakeandDazzle Posted 7 May 2009 , 3:15pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

I use SPS for fondant cakes, so no issue there. SMBC cakes, I use bubble straws and a dowel down the middle (sometimes). Then, I can cut them really close with a pair of thin scissors, check level, etc., then I am right down as close as possible without tearing up the icing afterwards. Always on foam core with press and seal also, no cake rounds used here!





I just bought foam core from joanns!! Though it would work better! Glad to see someone else does this already! Do you have to use the press n seal on it?

soygurl Posted 8 May 2009 , 7:41am
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

....and weird as this may sound, I have a much easier time getting the tiers 4" tall for the SPS with fondant, as opposed to levelling off the icing on a BC cake to get to the required 4". I don't know, I just do.




I can totally understand how it would be easier to get a certain height with fondant cakes! icon_wink.gif
I use SPS for all my stacked cakes, and some pillared cakes (can't figure out a way for people picking up/transporting their own cakes to use SPS pillars), but I cut the 9" pillars to size for each cake I do instead of making my cakes all 4" high.
But anyway, it sounds like you just use SPS for bigger or "more risky" cakes. I get it. icon_cool.gif

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