How Do You Deliver Unchilled Cakes?! Ack

Decorating By Chef_Stef Updated 2 May 2009 , 11:36am by VickiChicki

Chef_Stef Posted 2 May 2009 , 12:52am
post #1 of 14

I made the cake attached for my dd's school auction that is tonight. Didn't have time to finish it the night before as usual and fridge it overnight, because I started torting and filling it at 9:30 a.m. and left in the car with it at 1:30 p.m. same day. It got about 20 minutes in the fridge before we left.

By the time we got to the venue--the stupid fondant is already buckling at the bottom where the cake is still (after all morning on the counter!) settling? What the--?? How much further do you think it will buckle!? I set it up at 2 pm; auction wasn't til 5 pm. I won't be there but it's driving me nuts thinking how terrible it will probably look after 3 more hours (and then through the auction AND dinner) before someone takes it home.

WAH How on earth does anyone deliver a cake they decorated the same day?

Oh terrific--I see it's posting as the red X. Well, whatever. Anyway--it's sagging, if you can't see it. How do you guys avoid this??
LL

13 replies
PinkZiab Posted 2 May 2009 , 12:59am
post #2 of 14

I chill all my cakes, but it seems like a support issue. A well supported cake won't buckle/sink... end of story. What did you use for support? Is there a center dowel?

Chef_Stef Posted 2 May 2009 , 1:16am
post #3 of 14

Four wooden dowels and a center support.

Settling cake is more the issue...

I always overnight chill and never have support issues, this was just a last minute thing. Just curious how in heck anyone does these, on the same day.

Deb_ Posted 2 May 2009 , 1:16am
post #4 of 14

Hello,

I'm the *anti-fridge* lady icon_biggrin.gif I've never put any of my cakes in the fridge and they're fine when I deliver.

I can't and don't sell anything perishable per my HD, so it's not an issue for me.

I think your problem may have had more to do with the cake not having time to settle/or support issues like pinkziab suggested.

It's a great cake BTW, I'm sure it will bring in a great price for the auction. Remember as decorators we see every flaw in our own work, but I'm sure to the cake civilians out there they won't even notice it. icon_smile.gif

Ruth0209 Posted 2 May 2009 , 1:28am
post #5 of 14

That is a spectacularly cool cake! I really doubt anyone will notice the very slight bulging at the bottom. Remember, you see all the imperfections, but most cake civilians don't.

VickiChicki Posted 2 May 2009 , 1:37am
post #6 of 14

That is a very, very cool cake. I never refrigerate my cakes either. Doesn't dhilling them cause the fondant to condensate?
Also - what do you make your "curls" out of and how do you prevent them from breaking? I have used fondant, gumpaste and even pastillage and once they are stuck into the cake, the moisture from the cake causes them to become soft again and break!!! Any suggestions?

Deb_ Posted 2 May 2009 , 1:49am
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by VickiChicki

That is a very, very cool cake. I never refrigerate my cakes either. Doesn't dhilling them cause the fondant to condensate?
Also - what do you make your "curls" out of and how do you prevent them from breaking? I have used fondant, gumpaste and even pastillage and once they are stuck into the cake, the moisture from the cake causes them to become soft again and break!!! Any suggestions?




Stick the ends into drinking straws and then push that into the cake, it keeps it from softening.

luv2cook721 Posted 2 May 2009 , 2:04am
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

Quote:
Originally Posted by VickiChicki

That is a very, very cool cake. I never refrigerate my cakes either. Doesn't dhilling them cause the fondant to condensate?
Also - what do you make your "curls" out of and how do you prevent them from breaking? I have used fondant, gumpaste and even pastillage and once they are stuck into the cake, the moisture from the cake causes them to become soft again and break!!! Any suggestions?



Stick the ends into drinking straws and then push that into the cake, it keeps it from softening.




good to know

Momkiksbutt Posted 2 May 2009 , 2:10am
post #9 of 14

It's all about the support system....when it's solid, everything is solid! That and keep it out of the sun...

indydebi Posted 2 May 2009 , 2:10am
post #10 of 14

I'm also a non-chill person. In 30 years, I've never refrigerated a cake. When I deliver, I never pre-chill the van either. Put the cake in the back and THEN turn on the engine and THEN turn on the air. (Heck, I rarely run the air in the summer very much anyway.)

The cake looks really nice. We see it because it's what we do. But I'll bet the cake civilians never noticed.

nia0524 Posted 2 May 2009 , 2:14am
post #11 of 14

Your cake is really nice, I agree with dkelly, as decorators, we see the imperfections, non-decorators never see that, unless they live with a decorator.

Chef_Stef Posted 2 May 2009 , 2:21am
post #12 of 14

I'm thinking, maybe I just cut the dowels a hair too short. It's not like I'm ...tired...at all...lol. Running about 18 hours a day right now trying to keep dh's business going and get the new cake shop built, so this was a squeeze-in cake. It'll have to be what it is...I just hope it didn't settle much more; couldn't have--it was on the counter, iced, for quite awhile before I left.

I made the GP curls with toothpicks in the ends, then stuck Wilton floral picks in the cake and stuck the ends of the curls down in those to hold them.

I'm going to get some sleep. We have to be in there painting all 930 square feet of kitchen tomorrow at oh-dark:30 a.m.
Thanks everybody

indydebi Posted 2 May 2009 , 2:31am
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef_Stef

We have to be in there painting all 930 square feet of kitchen tomorrow at oh-dark:30 a.m.




icon_lol.gif oh-dark-thirty! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

VickiChicki Posted 2 May 2009 , 11:36am
post #14 of 14

THANK YOU so much both dkelly and Chef Stef for the tips on the curls! I had even tried wiring them with floral wire and then poking that through a ball of GP and rolling it out along the wire - but that is a pain and doesn't always work! Great tips! thumbs_up.gif I appreciate both of you sharing.

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