Crisp Edges And Fondant -- How?!

Decorating By doreenre Updated 2 May 2009 , 5:44am by deliciously_decadent

doreenre Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 10:58pm
post #1 of 18

How on earth do you get sharp/crisp edges, that aren't rounded, on a fondant-covered cake?

Even after leveling and ensuring smooth icing underneath, my nice clean edge on my fondant cake (square sides and/or round top edge) always ends up with the fondant rounding it out. icon_cry.gif It drives me crazy! Is there a secret!?

17 replies
MACakes Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 11:50pm
post #2 of 18

Here's a bump. I'd like to know too icon_wink.gif

PinkZiab Posted 1 May 2009 , 1:55am
post #3 of 18

For me, I chill my cakes until the buttercream is nice an firm. Then I make a nice sharp edge on the buttercream, whicH I find much easier to do on chilled bc. After that, the fondant also stays nice and sharp. Once the fondant has "set" on those sharp edges, even when the BC comes to room temp, it will hold a nice edge.

underthesun Posted 1 May 2009 , 1:56am
post #4 of 18

I'm a big fan of the SugarShack DVD, "Flawless Fondant". Well worth the money! Below is a preview of the DVD.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eK_M5N1TMxA&feature=related[/url]

aligotmatt Posted 1 May 2009 , 2:10am
post #5 of 18

I agree with Tara. crisp edged buttercream, nice and chilled. take 2 fondant smoothers, one on the side, one on top. once you have the side smoothed down, hold the one on the side and use the top one in the middle to go out and knock the side one. does that make sense?

mrsunknown Posted 1 May 2009 , 2:11am
post #6 of 18

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-629422.html

Here is a link to another forum discussing ganache under fondant to give you the crisp sharp edge

thumbs_up.gif

xstitcher Posted 1 May 2009 , 2:23am
post #7 of 18

I second getting Sugarshack's dvd's. In her fondant dvd she shows you how to do this. Here is a pic showing what aligotmatt was describing.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/deliciously_decadent/3406982472/in/set-72157616259103302/

I got the pic from adatay's new tutorial for topsy turvy cake found on this thread:

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=628992&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0

HTH! icon_smile.gif

sweetcravings Posted 1 May 2009 , 8:24pm
post #8 of 18

Wouldn't chilling the cake beforehand cause condensation to form under the fondant once the cake comes to room temp? Or do you put it right back into the fridge until serving?

Rylan Posted 1 May 2009 , 8:31pm
post #9 of 18

Adatay uses ganche and I think that makes a difference

sweetcravings Posted 1 May 2009 , 8:32pm
post #10 of 18

Wouldn't chilling the cake beforehand cause condensation to form under the fondant once the cake comes to room temp? Or do you put it right back into the fridge until serving?

katgal Posted 1 May 2009 , 8:41pm
post #11 of 18

Do not worry about chilling your cake before applying the fondant...it's actually a necessary step. Since fondant is pretty heavy, the chill helps stabalize your cake.

sweetcravings Posted 1 May 2009 , 8:51pm
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by katgal

Do not worry about chilling your cake before applying the fondant...it's actually a necessary step. Since fondant is pretty heavy, the chill helps stabalize your cake.




How long do you recommend? Do i have to apply anything to the crusted buttercream before applying it?

PinkZiab Posted 1 May 2009 , 9:02pm
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcravings

Wouldn't chilling the cake beforehand cause condensation to form under the fondant once the cake comes to room temp? Or do you put it right back into the fridge until serving?




I keep my cakes refrigerated until delivery (not serving time./.. obviously they sit out at weddings and parties. If my customers are picking up the day before the party, I do tell them to keep it refrigerated until a few hours before the event, and then take it out to allow it to come to room temp and the BC to soften. I use all from-scratch perishable fillings, so refrigeration over the course of the cake is necessary.

katgal Posted 1 May 2009 , 9:34pm
post #14 of 18

I usually refrigerate about 30 minutes or so. It works for me. Some may leave it in longer, or shorter. Not too long, though, the fridge will dry it out if it's left in there too long.
Hope this helps!

kyhendry Posted 1 May 2009 , 10:27pm
post #15 of 18

I was watching Ace of Cakes and Geoff was talking about that issue and he said the only way to get a sharp edge is to use two pieces and join them. It's hard to explain but I'll try.

Say you have a square cake. You cut a piece of fondant to fit the top and use an Exacto knife to trim it to fit exactly to the top. then you will roll out a strip of fondant to either go all the way around or one piece to go on each side of the cake (depending on if you want your corners to be sharp also. Try to trim the strip to be very close to the height of the sides of the cake (make it a little taller to allow for variances in height). Apply the strip to the sides of the cake and carefully use your Exacto knife to trim the excess part that sticks above your top part. Does this make sense??

The problem is you may always have that line where the two pieces of fondant meet up (you might be able to smooth it or use a brush with Vodka or lemon juice to make the seam less noticable).

I hope this was the info you were looking for.

sweetcravings Posted 1 May 2009 , 10:33pm
post #16 of 18

Thanks for all the great info. ;0)

deliciously_decadent Posted 2 May 2009 , 5:28am
post #17 of 18

hi all! well i was just popping on here to give the likn to show my edging technique and one of you lovely CC's has beaten me to it lol!!!!! thankyou i feel very special that you would recomend my methods, and yed i do use ganache, it sets firmer than BC allowing you to get awesome clean and crisp edges, creating a clean sharp ganache edge is paramount to acheiving your clean crisp fondant edges. if you have any questions please let meknow, but i do not decorate with BC so there may be others to help you in regards to that medium. always happy to help!!

deliciously_decadent Posted 2 May 2009 , 5:44am
post #18 of 18

p.s just thought i would add that we don't refrigerate our cakes or the fondant will sweat od droop, at worst if we are in a real rush we quick chill the cake to set the ganache and then remove allow to come back to room temp and then cover, but ideally we leave to set overnight or at worse a few hours, this process allows the cake to absorb some of the moisture from the ganache and become even better and the ganache sets firmer.

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