Canadian Home Bakeries!?!?!?

Decorating By sugarmamma03 Updated 1 May 2009 , 9:51pm by KristaK

sugarmamma03 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:05pm
post #1 of 24

I have been following the recent threads about the legality of selling from home without a liscence and I am wondering if anyone knows what the rules are for Canada? (Specifically Alberta??)
THanks!

23 replies
gerripje Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 10:11pm
post #2 of 24

Where in AB are you? I've been trying to find information, but it's not that easy. I think you need to check with your city/town or municipality, the health region for an inspector. I am pretty sure you need a separate kitchen from your usual house kitchen. It all comes down to what your town has set out for home business guidelines.HTH!

sugarmamma03 Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 7:01pm
post #3 of 24

Thanks! I live in Calgary, so if anyone has info on that please let me know.

pastryjen Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 8:10pm
post #4 of 24

I've been trying to figure it out and there have been a lot of phone calls! No one can answer my question fully. I have to get part of it here, another part there and then try to connect the answers.

Lots of luck to you.

-Tubbs Posted 1 May 2009 , 3:04am
post #5 of 24

I'm in Calgary and have approval for a separate basement kitchen. PM me and I'll try to answer your questions...

BigRed500 Posted 1 May 2009 , 4:06am
post #6 of 24

Any ideas/info for B.C.?

supermama322 Posted 1 May 2009 , 8:02am
post #7 of 24

How about SK...? LOL!
I have made phone calls and no one can tell me anything.. :/ The search continues!

cakes22 Posted 1 May 2009 , 12:45pm
post #8 of 24

Have you tried calling your local HD? When I was looking for info (and we all know how "helpful" Canadian gov. sites are!!) I got really frustrated and ended up just calling the Ottawa HD. What I got was 1) you needed a separate kitchen/utensils/food storage/appliances to sell baked goods 2) no free roaming pets unless you can "lock" them out of your kitchen (basically you need a door(s) in your kitchen) 3) If you were selling to other establishsments that would sell your baked goods (which is a whole different thing) then you needed to label/weigh/include nutritional values on everything. 4) you need to have your food safety/handling certificate. 5) Even if I had all the requirements in my home kitchen (separate sink etc) it was highly unlikey that I would pass anyway (they didn't expand on that point & I wasn't going to push it!)

Now that was in my town........the capital of Canada! lol!

BUT......

I was also told if I didn't advertise, they weren't going to hunt me down. They really don't go after small time bakers, unless you are advertising on Facebook/Craigslist etc. If you are getting your "business" by word of mouth and are keeping a low key, then you fly under the radar.

Maybe we should all revolt like the Texas & Florida bakers and get the laws changed!!!!

I'm off to picket on the Hill..........Stephen Harper here I come!!!

cakeinthebox4U Posted 1 May 2009 , 12:56pm
post #9 of 24

Cakes22 I'm with you! Tell me when you are storming the hill and I'll join you icon_biggrin.gif I'd love to get the bill changed in Ontario/Canada to make it easier to have a legal home bakery.

pastryjen Posted 1 May 2009 , 12:56pm
post #10 of 24

I found out from my region that we must have the separate kitchen etc - like cakes22 said but my town only allows 1 kitchen per residence/dwelling and they are more than fine with me baking out of my own kitchen...hmmmmm!

HD also mentioned they weren't allowed on private property (not quite sure what else that meant)!

I've just decided that I'm going to look into renting.

kello Posted 1 May 2009 , 12:57pm
post #11 of 24

I'm coming too Cakes22!!!

michellesArt Posted 1 May 2009 , 1:03pm
post #12 of 24

yeah i got a lot of conflicting anwers regarding the separate kitchen, doors, ect but also the canadian gov't website lists catering as a plossible (?) homebased business-go figure the right hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing (and being lefthanded i take offense to that lol) it's very frustrating but i've kept lowkey and am as busy as i want to be until i can take the next step (my own store!!-anyone want to go in with me?)

cakeinthebox4U Posted 1 May 2009 , 1:05pm
post #13 of 24

Pastryjen I see you are in Ontario also do you mind me asking what region you are in? I don't want a 2nd kitchen in my home but right now I'm a stay at home mom with 2 under 2 so I don't have time to rent (or leave the house for that matter icon_smile.gif ) Maybe once both girls are in school....

Cheyanne25 Posted 1 May 2009 , 1:17pm
post #14 of 24

I'm in Kingston ON, and I've been on the hunt to try and find some of the same information. I have a chef professor who works from a home kitchen; he gave me some tips: Besides the separate kitchen and tools, there are lighting and flooring regulations, hand washing facilities,and specific tiling. I've got an appointment with a local official to get some more specific information... hopefully they'll be able to give a clear answer.

tortitas Posted 1 May 2009 , 1:31pm
post #15 of 24

I'm in Brampton and trying to start my own business and let me tell you it's been hell! For those who are doing business out of the home they are doing it illegally. It is very obvious who these people are because there is no address indicated on their website. This way they can't be hunted down unless they are reported. Imagine if someone gets sick from their stuff, guess where the health department will end up? at your doorstep!
I checked with the City and it says that there is to be no home baking/cooking allowed from a residential home even if you have a second kitchen. So,I'm taking the long way round and doing it legally, if I can't find kitchen rental then I'll have to look out of town.

pastryjen Posted 1 May 2009 , 1:39pm
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by pudwick

Pastryjen I see you are in Ontario also do you mind me asking what region you are in? I don't want a 2nd kitchen in my home but right now I'm a stay at home mom with 2 under 2 so I don't have time to rent (or leave the house for that matter icon_smile.gif ) Maybe once both girls are in school....




I'm in Newmarket, York region.

I've been where you are...my kids are 5 and 7 now...it gets easier.

Baking would just be a part of the business there is a whole other side with a friend (and that part can be done from home). We are just getting started and figuring things out. This is why I want to be doing it legally.

cakes22 Posted 1 May 2009 , 1:41pm
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by michellesArt

yeah i got a lot of conflicting anwers regarding the separate kitchen, doors, ect but also the canadian gov't website lists catering as a plossible (?) homebased business-go figure the right hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing (and being lefthanded i take offense to that lol) it's very frustrating but i've kept lowkey and am as busy as i want to be until i can take the next step (my own store!!-anyone want to go in with me?)




I think the problem with the catering is that you run into safe food temp guidelines and if your really only interested in selling cakes, the catering umbrella is more complicated than what its worth, JMHO. icon_biggrin.gif

I have looked into the renting kitchen thing, but for the limited cakes I do do, which are for close friends/family, then my expense out way my profit. I'm not "into" wedding cakes (I like my weekends), so I'm pretty low key and don't have a large repertoire of cakes-n-such. Renting is really not something I would be interested in. Question though: if you are renting a kitchen & you bake your cake there (cause you can't bake at home) does that mean you have to decorate it there too? Since technically your home kitchen isn't up to par........that would mean hauling all your gear, pans, ingredients, blah blah blah......too much work! I iz lazyeee!

Seriously though, we should try and figure out what it takes to change the laws.........gonna look into that. I know our local MPP. I'll ask around.
icon_razz.gif

SUELA Posted 1 May 2009 , 1:55pm
post #18 of 24

I'm in Ottawa (actually Kanata) so I will help storm the hill!

pastryjen Posted 1 May 2009 , 2:28pm
post #19 of 24

I do believe you need separate equipment for each kitchen...do I keep the KA for my home use or do I use it for the business? It's so darn heavy!

Maybe a good hand mixer for the business will be sufficient.

I wouldn't be doing wedding cakes either.

cakes22 Posted 1 May 2009 , 2:52pm
post #20 of 24

Hi SUELA, haven't 'seen' you in awhile icon_smile.gif !


[quoteI do believe you need separate equipment for each kitchen...do I keep the KA for my home use or do I use it for the business? It's so darn heavy! [/quote]

Ain't that the truth! Who needs a gym when you have a KA???

margaretb Posted 1 May 2009 , 8:52pm
post #21 of 24

Hey wonderful Canadians! Here is a link about alberta food processing facilities: http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex10001#Home. Here is a cut and paste of sample requirements:

It is a good idea to consult with the Public Health inspector about using the facility. You will still need a food establishment permit for your business, as well as a business license.

Examples of standard requirements:
All surfaces, including the floor, walls, ceiling, counters, cupboards and shelving that is located in any storage, food preparation area or walk-in cooler/freezer, must be constructed of materials that are smooth, non-absorbent, free of cracks or crevices, easily washable, and of good repair and sound condition.
Dry food storage space must be adequate for the size and type of food facility.
Cold food storage equipment must be sufficient to store all perishable foods, and equipped with thermometers.
Storage space for your employees personal effects (i.e. purses, shoes, clothing) is required. Lockers located in the staff washroom are an example.
All foods must come from an approved source. All water must be potable.
A hand-washing sink is required in the food preparation area.
There are two options available which meet the dishwashing requirements. The first is a three-compartment stainless steel pot sink, complete with drain boards and back splash, thats deep enough to submerge the largest cooking utensil. The second is a two-compartment sink and a commercial dishwasher, which meets National Sanitation Foundation requirements. Extra water heating equipment may be required if a high temperature dishwasher is used.
An approved method of ventilation is required to remove odors, grease, smoke, steam and heat from areas where food is prepared.
Adequate lighting and ventilation are required. Adequate make-up air is required for the proper operation of the kitchen exhaust system. Lights must be covered with shatter shields.

------

And if you can't do the second kitchen at home (assuming your town zoning even allows it), how on earth can you afford to rent if you are just an occasional caker? I mean, I just made a 9x13x4 inch cake, torted and fondant figures on top for a neighbour. I figured out what it cost me, and I figure about $27 out of pocket (some of it is VERY estimated, but then I also didn't need a box because I brought it to her in a rubbermaid and I don't include the $10 sheet of foam board I cut the base out of because she gave it back), plus 6+hours (that does not include time for baking or cleaning or making the fondant because I had half a batch left over from a previous cake). So say 6 hours at $10 an hour (which I don't think is much for skilled labour, especially because I am married to a welder and I bet I could learn to weld faster than he could learn to decorate!!), plus cost of ingredents, and you are looking at an $87 dollar cake. And if I had to rent a kitchen -- well, I would be lucky to find something for $20 an hour, and do you think it is okay to bring your 1, 3 and 5 year old with you when you do your baking? so even saying I could get my mom do watch them for a day for a token $20, that would be over a $200 cake. Add on fuel to get to town and insurance and licenses. Think there are enough takers in my town of 1500 in rural alberta to make a cake business worthwhile?

pastryjen Posted 1 May 2009 , 9:04pm
post #22 of 24

MargaretB - doing them here and there like you, I wouldn't care. It wouldn't be worth it to rent.

It's kinda sad.

mrswendel Posted 1 May 2009 , 9:12pm
post #23 of 24

Government definitely doesn't make it easy! I have been looking into things for the last year and half and basically, the HD for our area told me it was "impossible" to have a home based bakery and they weren't aware of any locations that would rent out their kitchen. Even if they did, you would be requred to do the cake from beginning to end, including all decorating as they consider fondant and gumpaste a food product. The Wilton instructors I've had told me not to even bother with trying to get legal as it was impossible. I had a glimmer of hope when a local storefront came up for lease....until I looked in the cost. $1200/month rent + approx $500 month in tax, plus hydro. Yeah...I would need ALOT more business! But I will keep looking....

KristaK Posted 1 May 2009 , 9:51pm
post #24 of 24

I also have a seperate kitchen that I run my business out of in Calgary. Let me know if you have any questions and I'll try and help you out.

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