6 Hour Car Ride With A Wedding Cake...

Decorating By val_nutrimetics Updated 6 May 2009 , 11:28pm by val_nutrimetics

val_nutrimetics Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 7:11pm
post #1 of 12

Hey everyone,

I have a couple of quick questions regarding an upcoming order for a wedding cake. My first (and main) question is about travelling with the cake. The cake would need to go on a 6 hour car ride, and I am a little worried about shifting and bulging. The cake will be 3 tiers, and will need to feed 100 people (not including the top tier), and will be covered in fondant. My cousin will be picking up the cake so anything that will need to be done at the reception hall will have to be minimal. Should I stack the 3 tiers, or should I give my cousin the tiers in separate boxes and get her to put them together there? What fillings would hold up better on the drive there? What is the best stacking method to use (plates and nails, dowels)? Would the shape of the cakes make a difference travelling that far, or would a circle hold up the same as a square, a petal or a hexagon?

I have seen beautiful beach themed wedding cakes in the galleries, but does anyone have any recommendations on decorations that would hold up for the drive?

I appreciate any input, ideas or suggestions that anybody may have to help me out with.

Thanks in advance,
Valerie.

11 replies
indydebi Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 7:35pm
post #2 of 12

I would use the hidden pillars or the push in pillars.

Hidden (if you want the cakes to be flush): http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E3119F0-475A-BAC0-5772682F766C019C&fid=63EB9DA7-475A-BAC0-522158B536D3E04A
Push-in (if you want some space between the tiers): http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E3119FF-475A-BAC0-56858282E1C02DE1&fid=63EB9DD6-475A-BAC0-5CC92A385169EC6C

The pillars can be pushed into the cake ahead of time, each tier transported separately, and once it gets to the site, the tiers can be just placed onto the pillars (the legs on the plate under the upper tier will fit directly into the pillars).

This would be the easiest for a cake civilian to set up.

sari66 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 7:54pm
post #3 of 12

You can also use sps that willlet the cake travel in one piece. It doesn't matter what shape cake you make.
As for fillings, using sleeved fillings is good dont have to worry about keeping it cool.
Chocolate shells or whatever decos you planned on using will be fine.

hth

dolcebaci Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:10pm
post #4 of 12

I agree witn indydebi..I do all the prep work before hand and then left they set it up at the location.

I had to deliver a cake last summer it was only a 45 mintue drive and it was 102F outside that day...and I prayed all the way that it wouldn't bludge ...thank God it didn't but...you never know.

Better to be safe then sorry icon_biggrin.gif

tirechic Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:11pm
post #5 of 12

sorry but what are sleeved fillings? Still learning sorry.

indydebi Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:13pm
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tirechic

sorry but what are sleeved fillings? Still learning sorry.




http://countrykitchensa.com/catalog/SearchResults.aspx

(If the page doesn't come up right, put "fillings" in the search box at the top of the page)

summernoelle Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:20pm
post #7 of 12

The best thing would be SPS. This makes cakes rock solid (unless you drive crazy, of course) and I feel very confident using them. Global Sugar Art has them. Good luck! icon_smile.gif

BabyBear3 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:27pm
post #8 of 12

if you are worried about bulging with the filling, you could always use the traditional buttercream in the middle. medium consistency to stiff. that way it would hold up very well. IMO

NanaFixIt Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:27pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by tirechic

sorry but what are sleeved fillings? Still learning sorry.



http://countrykitchensa.com/catalog/SearchResults.aspx

(If the page doesn't come up right, put "fillings" in the search box at the top of the page)




debi - I checked out the site and the fillings say 'may be refrigerated or frozen' - but they don't have to be, is that correct?

indydebi Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:29pm
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by NanaFixIt

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by tirechic

sorry but what are sleeved fillings? Still learning sorry.



http://countrykitchensa.com/catalog/SearchResults.aspx

(If the page doesn't come up right, put "fillings" in the search box at the top of the page)



debi - I checked out the site and the fillings say 'may be refrigerated or frozen' - but they don't have to be, is that correct?




correct. I put them in the 'frig after I open them, but I store unopened ones on the shelf in the storage room, and when they're on the cake, I don't refrigerate.

auntmamie Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 11:32pm
post #11 of 12

Val,

I noticed you're in Montreal. If you do want to by SPS, the best place would be Global Sugar Arts. They are in Plattsburgh, NY (take the 15 to the border, then 87 south). Actually, it's a great place to go even if you don't need SPS. icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

val_nutrimetics Posted 6 May 2009 , 11:28pm
post #12 of 12

Hey everyone,
Thank you for all of your replies, I was having trouble with my laptop so I haven't been able to check back in for any answers until today. I tried looking for more info on the sps system, but I am still a bit unsure of what exactly it is. Would anyone mind explaining it to me, because I really am interested in learning about it, especially if this would be the best way to transport the cake already stacked. I am considering making the drive myself with the cake, that way I am less limited with the design I can use. Would you still, recommend transporting the layers seperately, or would using the sps system make it okay to travel with?

Thanks again,
Val

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