Advice/recommendations Needed Please!

Baking By Evoir Updated 30 Apr 2009 , 10:57pm by Evoir

Evoir Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 12:46pm
post #1 of 15

I need to make some cookies for a little girl's 2nd birthday party. I have been asked to make plain sugar cookies that are nice and crisp/crunchy (not a soft, chewy cookie) but also with icing.

What is a failsafe crisp cookie recipe to use? I would like them to be shaped and hence NOT spread.

Secondly, what is the best kind of icing for preventing the cookie from softening? MMF, RI, glace or RBC?

Also (last question I promise) can I make these cookies and ice them 2 days in advance? Will they go soft in that period, even if I store them in an airtight container and packaged in cello bags?

MANY MANY THANKS IN ADVANCE icon_smile.gif

Eve

14 replies
jamiekwebb Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 12:52pm
post #2 of 15

I don't really know the answers to any of these queations. I would think though that you would want to use RI. Here is a bump

jlynnw Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 12:55pm
post #3 of 15

There is a recipe for NFSC (no fail sugar cookies) that I like to use. I like them the RI or candy clay. If you do them ahead with RI they will be fine unless you have high humidity. That has been my experience any way. HTH.

Evoir Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 9:54am
post #4 of 15

Thanks icon_smile.gif I guess I'll jtry ther NFSCs and see how they turn out!

One more question - what is the best thing for sticking fondant to cookies? RI or sugar syrup? Something else?

cloudy30 Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 10:16am
post #5 of 15

I personally like to use piping gel, right out of the over, I place the already brushed side of the fondant cut out onto the warm cookie, always works for me

Evoir Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 10:19am
post #6 of 15

Great idea! Thank you icon_smile.gif

spunkybear Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 10:35am
post #7 of 15

I just have my fondant cut and ready and immediately after I pull them out of the oven (still on cookie sheet) I place my fondant on them. The heat from the cookie is more than enough to make it stick. I then remove to cool completely and then further decorate if needed. No muss No fuss.

bbmom Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 11:15am
post #8 of 15

I havent tried RBC but iMO MMF is chewy. I prefer RI as icing for my cookies. my kids dont like the chewing gum texture of fiondant.

Evoir Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 11:22am
post #9 of 15

I've always used RI in the past, but only on traditional gingerbread cookies. This will be the first time trying full-on decorating a regular sugar cookie, LOL icon_smile.gif

Thanks for the advice - depending on time, I may try both ways...I can see tomorrow will be a full day in the kitchen! As I said originally - my main concern is the icing softening the cokie prematurely :-/

cathyfowler662 Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 11:34am
post #10 of 15

I have never had RI soften my NFSC recipe before. I usually make the cookies a few days in advance so that the RI has a chance to completely dry. Then they stack just fine.

If you are afraid of the cookies spreading, but the cut cookies in the fridge for a few minutes, then pop them into the oven. They will definitely hold their shape then.

HTH.

Evoir Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 11:45am
post #11 of 15

Great idea, Cathy - thanks icon_smile.gif I noticed ont he NFSC recipe it recommended to chill the rolled pastry before cutting as another alternative...lots of great ideas!

bonniebakes Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 12:14pm
post #12 of 15

Evoir - the NFSC recipe is really wonderful. Some people have problems with it seeming "crumbly," but let the dough keep mixing until it comes together.

Also, you might want to try Antonia74's royal icing recipe (here on CC) - it's great and easy to use for decorating cookies and doesn't dry "rock hard" like a traditional RI for gingerbread. It's certainly hard enough to stack and bag after 12-14 hours, but it won't break your teeth.

indydebi Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 12:29pm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by spunkybear

I just have my fondant cut and ready and immediately after I pull them out of the oven (still on cookie sheet) I place my fondant on them. The heat from the cookie is more than enough to make it stick. I then remove to cool completely and then further decorate if needed. No muss No fuss.



Me, too.

I would suggest if you want crispy cookies, to roll the dough thinner than normal.

WendyB Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 7:40pm
post #14 of 15

If the cookie has cooled, I just brush some water on the back of the fondant to make it stick. That's been enough glue for me.

Evoir Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 10:57pm
post #15 of 15

You guys rock icon_smile.gif

Thanks so much for all the pointers!

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