Confused About 2 Tier Cakes

Decorating By LP4702 Updated 4 May 2009 , 4:32am by patticakesnc

LP4702 Posted 28 Apr 2009 , 11:35pm
post #1 of 22

I have done them in the past but have never put a cake board under the first tier......is this a bad thing??????

21 replies
springlakecake Posted 28 Apr 2009 , 11:38pm
post #2 of 22

I would always put a cake board under each cake icon_biggrin.gif

pattycakesnj Posted 28 Apr 2009 , 11:40pm
post #3 of 22

You need a cake board or plate under each tier because when it gets disassembled to cut, how would you remove the tier? You would be just removing a glob of cake? Plus the upper tiers could sink onto the dowels or whatever you are using for support. JMHO.

jennifer7777 Posted 28 Apr 2009 , 11:40pm
post #4 of 22

It's always a good idea to put a board. The 1st 2-tier I made, which was for practice for the house, I didn't use a board. But now I do, especially if for an order. Plus, it gives stability and a base for cutting.

indydebi Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 12:22am
post #5 of 22

Since you mention you've never used a cardboard before, it prompts me to ask the question "are you talking about a two TIER cake or a two LAYER cake"?

You can put two layers of cake on top of each other without dowels, but if you put two tiers (4 layers), then you very likely need cardboard and dowels.

LP4702 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 12:38am
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Since you mention you've never used a cardboard before, it prompts me to ask the question "are you talking about a two TIER cake or a two LAYER cake"?

You can put two layers of cake on top of each other without dowels, but if you put two tiers (4 layers), then you very likely need cardboard and dowels.


Yes, I was referring to a 2 tier cake - one with 4 layers. Guess I've just been lucky to have had no problems!!!! But this cake is for someone very special to me and I want to make it the best I can, so am very glad to have asked.

I saw somewhere else where someone mentioned putting coconut on the bottom tier before adding the top tier as to help prevent the top cake board from sticking. They actually offered 2 different things to use, but I don't remember what the other one was....does anyone know??

Thanks so much for all your help!!!!

LP4702 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 12:50am
post #7 of 22
Quote:
Quote:

I saw somewhere else where someone mentioned putting coconut on the bottom tier before adding the top tier as to help prevent the top cake board from sticking. They actually offered 2 different things to use, but I don't remember what the other one was....does anyone know??




lol....ya know how it is when you see something but can't remember where?????? I knew I couldn't rest til I found it....lol!!! It was a tip from Wilton and the other thing they recommended was powdered sugar. Does anyone do this?????


Thanks again everyone for your help!!!!! icon_biggrin.gif

hummingbird59 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 12:58am
post #8 of 22

I use powdered sugar but they also say you can use cornstarch. I didn't know this at first and the top of the bottom tier was a mess under the board. I am doing my first 4 tier this weekend so hope I remember all these little tricks.

good luck with your cake.

LP4702 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 1:00am
post #9 of 22

WOW Sue - 4 tiers?!?!?! Thanks for the tip and good luck to you!! Hope you post pics!!!!

jamiekwebb Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 1:09am
post #10 of 22

Definitly need a board. Plastic is better than cardboard and plastic dowels are best too. 4 dowels minimum. I used to live in Dayton, Ohio... now I am in Virginia. hows the weather about now? Ours is perfect.

drakegore Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 1:11am
post #11 of 22

do you think this powdered sugar under the board trick would would with a non-crusting bc like smbc?

thanks!
diane

LP4702 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 1:15am
post #12 of 22

Hi there jamiekwebb!!! Thanks for sharing your tips with me!!! Weather is finally getting nicer, although we did have a bit of rain today. How are you liking Virginia?

jamiekwebb Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 1:59am
post #13 of 22

I love it! I have been here for 6 years now. We have had great weather. Today and Yesterday were 85. Our winters aren't as harsh either.

Not a problem about the tips. I found out the hard way about 4 being better than 3. I hade about 5 cakes lean on me and I finally discovered why. Hope it goes well for you.

Kitagrl Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 2:06am
post #14 of 22

I use a circle of wax paper between cake and cake board to prevent sticking...using a bit of icing to make sure it doesn't slide around.

hummingbird59 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 3:05am
post #15 of 22

This is for a niece's wedding so I hope it turns out nice for her. I am glad she wanted to let me practice with her special day. I told her I have never done one and she still asked me to do it. Gosh, not sure the stress is worth the practice or the cost. I do love her though.

jardot22 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 1:05pm
post #16 of 22

This maybe a stupid question, but why wouldn't you want the second tier to stick to the bottom tier? Wouldn't the top tier be in danger of sliding off if you put a barrier in between? I guess if you dowelled them together through the center it would be ok support-wise, but I always "glue" my top tier to my bottom tier with buttercream to prevent shifting. Please excuse my ignorance LOL.

indydebi Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 2:00pm
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jardot22

This maybe a stupid question, but why wouldn't you want the second tier to stick to the bottom tier? Wouldn't the top tier be in danger of sliding off if you put a barrier in between? I guess if you dowelled them together through the center it would be ok support-wise, but I always "glue" my top tier to my bottom tier with buttercream to prevent shifting. Please excuse my ignorance LOL.




It's only in "danger" of sliding off if the cake is moving. Once the cake is set up (and I do most of my assembly on-site), you put the top tier on the cake and walk away. It's not going anywhere unless your cake is really crooked and gravity takes hold.

Most people are concerned with the look of the cake when you remove the top tier ..... they dont' want the icing from the bottom tier to stick to the bottom of the top tier.

I use a crusting BC and I've never had the icing stick (and I stay to cut most of my cakes, so I see it first hand).

I always urge caution on using coconut as a non-stick barrier. I am a person who HATES coconut (there is no font big enough to show you how much I HATE cococnut), and if I bought a cake with one flake of coconut on it, I would return the entire cake and demand a full refund because I would deem the cake totally inedible. If you feel you HAVE to use something between the cake tiers, check with the client before using coconut. (some people have allergies to it, also.)

jardot22 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 2:04pm
post #18 of 22

Ok gotcha - that completely makes sense if you are assembling on-site icon_smile.gif Thanks for the clarification!

I agree - I wouldn't use coconut unless the customer specifically requested that flavor in the cake!

LP4702 Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 2:27pm
post #19 of 22

thanks indydebi for the info....it helps immensely!!!!!!!!!

springlakecake Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 5:00pm
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by jardot22

This maybe a stupid question, but why wouldn't you want the second tier to stick to the bottom tier? Wouldn't the top tier be in danger of sliding off if you put a barrier in between? I guess if you dowelled them together through the center it would be ok support-wise, but I always "glue" my top tier to my bottom tier with buttercream to prevent shifting. Please excuse my ignorance LOL.



It's only in "danger" of sliding off if the cake is moving. Once the cake is set up (and I do most of my assembly on-site), you put the top tier on the cake and walk away. It's not going anywhere unless your cake is really crooked and gravity takes hold.

Most people are concerned with the look of the cake when you remove the top tier ..... they dont' want the icing from the bottom tier to stick to the bottom of the top tier.

I use a crusting BC and I've never had the icing stick (and I stay to cut most of my cakes, so I see it first hand).

I always urge caution on using coconut as a non-stick barrier. I am a person who HATES coconut (there is no font big enough to show you how much I HATE cococnut), and if I bought a cake with one flake of coconut on it, I would return the entire cake and demand a full refund because I would deem the cake totally inedible. If you feel you HAVE to use something between the cake tiers, check with the client before using coconut. (some people have allergies to it, also.)




Boy you really hate coconut! LOL. Must be the same way that I feel about mustard. Easter was difficult this year because MIL glazed the ham with this mustard stuff. I took some ham (even though I really didnt want to) and stayed at least an inch from the edge of the piece. My stomach is lurching just thinking about it.

hummingbird59 Posted 4 May 2009 , 4:16am
post #21 of 22

LP4702,

I have posted photos of both the 4 tier wedding cake and the groom's cake (he is a pipefitter) in my photos. It was a lot of work, but my niece loved it and I received many compliments. Someone even wanted to talk to me about a cake which I turned down. This is just a hobby I do for family and church. I am glad I finally got to do a wedding cake though.

patticakesnc Posted 4 May 2009 , 4:32am
post #22 of 22

Yep, there are a lot of people with coconut allergies. My ex husband is one of them. We had no idea until one Christmas he has some of moms german chocolate cake.....bad bad bad reaction. Not life threatening but not good....not good for any of us!

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