Do All Cakes Rise In The Middle???

Decorating By Irishbliss Updated 30 Apr 2009 , 11:47am by indydebi

Irishbliss Posted 28 Apr 2009 , 8:04pm
post #1 of 10

Hi,

My cakes always rise quite a bit in the middle so then I have to level quite a bit. I always make sure I spread the cake mixture so it is flat before baking and I am using high quality pans so it is not that.

Just wondering can I stop the cakes rising so much in the centre? I just can't imagine everyones does this!

9 replies
dawndunn Posted 28 Apr 2009 , 8:11pm
post #2 of 10

Try reducing the temperature that you are baking at, or bake with an upturned tin or baking sheet over the top to begin with.

I use a madeira cake for sponges, and bake them at 120 c. I place a flat baking sheet over the top for the first hour, and they come out completely flat and rise to around 4 inches high

jardot22 Posted 28 Apr 2009 , 8:13pm
post #3 of 10

What I do (if my cakes dome at all), is flatten them with a clean kitchen towel right after they come out of the oven, then wrap them in cling wrap - this way you press all the extra air out of them and they retain more moisture, plus you don't have to do much leveling, if any at all, once they are cool.

indydebi Posted 28 Apr 2009 , 8:21pm
post #4 of 10

What jardot22 says works very well! I do that for sheet cakes and non-wedding cakes.

Reducing the temp and using baking strips around your pans will reduce the doming effect.

HEre's the science behind how baking strips work: http://forum.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=3467363#3467363

JanH Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 11:51pm
post #5 of 10

Duplicate post, for additional responses, please also see:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-629079.html

HTH

mrsunknown Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 11:58pm
post #6 of 10

i was having the exact problem until yesterday and last night i had success!!!! icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif
A perfectly risen cake with no done....no crust fairly moist (think will reduce the cooking time a little next time) ..nothing to trim!!!!
Buy and oven thermometer.....your oven thermostat might not work too well
lower baking temp, longer tme
double line your cake tin with baking paper, this will help reduce crusty edges
try a different recipe

the recipe i was using use to be a little on the thin side, new one is quite thick!!!

aliciag829 Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 12:07am
post #7 of 10

Baking strips work very well to fix this.

Cakes rise more in the middle because the metal around the outside of the pan gets hot faster, so the sides of the cake set faster, while the center is still baking and rising higher than the sides. (Because the center doesn't have as much contact with metal as the sides of the cake do)

HTH

clovely Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 12:47am
post #8 of 10

The bake even strips solve this almost every time for me.

mrsunknown Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 3:35am
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by jardot22

What I do (if my cakes dome at all), is flatten them with a clean kitchen towel right after they come out of the oven, then wrap them in cling wrap - this way you press all the extra air out of them and they retain more moisture, plus you don't have to do much leveling, if any at all, once they are cool.




Would this method be tha same as coolin it on a cooling rack rised side down?

indydebi Posted 30 Apr 2009 , 11:47am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsunknown

Quote:
Originally Posted by jardot22

What I do (if my cakes dome at all), is flatten them with a clean kitchen towel right after they come out of the oven, then wrap them in cling wrap - this way you press all the extra air out of them and they retain more moisture, plus you don't have to do much leveling, if any at all, once they are cool.



Would this method be tha same as coolin it on a cooling rack rised side down?




In my ever so never humble opinion .....

no, no, no, no, don't do this! If you lay the cake "upside down" on the hump or the dome, then the corners of the cake are up in the air and are not supported by anything. Cakes are very law-abiding items, and they will follow the law of gravity ...... the corners will 'fall' down, causing your cake to crack or even to break, depending on how big the dome is.

I would STRONGLY suggested you dont' do this.

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