Cake Falling Apart When Cutting

Decorating By fondantfrenzy Updated 7 Jun 2009 , 1:39pm by jonahsmom

fondantfrenzy Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 3:09am
post #1 of 17

Ok, let me try to explain this the best I can.

When my cakes are cut, and served as they are placing it on the plate, or moving it over the layers seperate where the filling it. I am using bettercream in the middle. My cakes are covered in fondant...Anybody have any ides why this is happening...it makes cutting the cakes a pain the butt and also it looks really sloppy.


HELP!

16 replies
Momkiksbutt Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 3:25am
post #2 of 17

Too big of servings, not enough moisture in the cake, and the wrong size serving knife can all be contributors. I'd also make sure that you cut the cake, whatever the shape, in the recommended way. That really helps. There are some cake cutting guidelines posted on the CC, just search the gallery for them.

Hope that helps!

Lisa

fondantfrenzy Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 3:28am
post #3 of 17

Well, not sure if it is the moisture in the cake..but should i dampen the layer's with a little bitg of water or syrup on the side that is touching the cream?

Momkiksbutt Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 6:49am
post #4 of 17

Well, just a tip about assembling your cakes: Try glazing your cake layers with simple syrup before assembling. This will lock in the moisture, and it will make it more cohesive too. Be sure to make an icing dam around the edges of the layer before you add the filling and then crumb coat it. Now the most important part after this is making sure it is good and chilled before moving on to the next step. I always wrap mine in press and seal and then put it in the fridge over night. That will firm it up for you.

Make sure to let it come back to room temp though before icing it, covered still. Then take off the wrap and ice. This should help you keep it from crumbling for the most part. Another thing is what kind of recipe you use. If your using the WASC recipe, make sure to use only Pillsbury brand cake mix with pudding in the mix. I've tried others, they just don't come out with the same nice, not to dense, not to light, consistancy, and perfectly moist every single time. Good ingredients are everything in baking....

Hope this helps. Let me know know it works for you!

indydebi Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 1:05pm
post #5 of 17

The type of knife makes a difference. A straight edge sharp knife works better than a serated knife, which is ironic because all the bride's cake-cutting knives that I've see are serrated. This is especially true if it's a fondant covered cake.

Momkiksbutt mentioned the serving knife. Get a cake-cutting-comb. You can see it in my "how to cut a wedding cake" photos on my website. There is NOTHING better to transfer a cut piece of cake from cake stand to serving plate. http://cateritsimple.com/_wsn/page10.html

The method of laying the 2" strip on it's side will REALLY help, too. It prevents the cake from being smooshed when cutting, especially if it's a fondant cake.

Too much filling can be a problem. I've cut other peoples cakes and when the (especially fruit) filling is too thick, it's harder to control the cake. Had one recently that I HAD to lay it on it's side to cut because the top layer was ready to slide right off of the bottom layer while I was cutting it! Once I laid it on it's side, even the girl helping me with the plates commented, "Boy, those are MUCH better looking since you did that!"

fondantfrenzy Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 2:54pm
post #6 of 17

Ok i have not done the wrapping thing..I need to try that in addition to the simple syrup..Thank you all. The question i have is Indydebi said the 2 inch strip? Please elaborate a little bit more on that for me?

indydebi Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 3:10pm
post #7 of 17

2" strip .... see the link above on my website on "how to cut a wedding cake". You cut it in a 2" strip then cut that into 1" pieces. There are step by step photos to show you what I mean.

-K8memphis Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 3:32pm
post #8 of 17

I didn't read everything but if a cake is too fresh this can happen.

Just like meat and wine need aging--I 'age' my cakes in the freezer (almost always) at least overnight.

Just a too fresh thought for you. icon_biggrin.gif

toodlesjupiter Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 3:36pm
post #9 of 17

Debi- Where do you get your cake-cutting-combs again? I thought I had it bookmarked, but I can't find it. TIA!

indydebi Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 3:45pm
post #10 of 17
CakeDesigns Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 4:03pm
post #11 of 17

umm! I've followed those instructions and sometimes my cake crumbles. My cakes are VERY moist (almost tres leches), never a filling, and always follow the 2" rule when cutting. I think it has to do more with the baking and mixing than the way I cut the cake. I haven't figure it out yet though.

toodlesjupiter Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 4:05pm
post #12 of 17

Bummer... it says they are closed now. Do you know anywhere else to get them(even if it costs a little more), or was that the only place? BTW, Thanks for replying so quickly!

flowermom Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 4:05pm
post #13 of 17

I always had a hard time cutting cakes, until I saw Debi's method. Most people give me a funny look or comment when I start cutting my cakes this way, but eventually they catch on that her method is so much less messy and so much easier. Since I am usually at the event when it gets time to cut the cake, I have started bringing my own knife with me, now I am going to add the comb so it's truly Debi's method! Also if I am not going to stay at the event when the cake is cut, I give a copy of Debi's instructions the person who in charge of the cake or event.

Happy Baking! Sandi

indydebi Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 5:02pm
post #14 of 17

I usually buy my combs from ebay. They are also called angel food cake combs and cheese combs.

Momkiksbutt Posted 1 May 2009 , 7:12pm
post #15 of 17

Here's a link that will work, and the price is right too!

http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=103655

And here's the "2 inch method" tutorial for ya!

http://www.cateritsimple.com/_wsn/page10.html

JanH Posted 20 May 2009 , 8:30am
post #16 of 17

Just what indydebi said. thumbs_up.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Momkiksbutt

Another thing is what kind of recipe you use. If your using the WASC recipe, make sure to use only Pillsbury brand cake mix with pudding in the mix. I've tried others, they just don't come out with the same nice, not to dense, not to light, consistancy, and perfectly moist every single time. Good ingredients are everything in baking....




I have tried all three major cake mix brands, and now use Duncan Hines exclusively - because it yields the best results when making the WASC cake (with or without oil and in any flavor). judge.gif

HTH

jonahsmom Posted 7 Jun 2009 , 1:39pm
post #17 of 17

Dude, totally need to monitor how it's being cut.

Last weekend, I did a huge cake for my Grandparent's 50th anniversary. My uncle decided that he wanted to "help" me with cutting the cake. Before I knew it, he had a knife in his hand and was SLAUGHTERING the cake! I tried to be nice....it was crumbling all over and the pieces, although still tasty, looked like sh**!!!

I finally looked at him and said..."do you just want me to do it?!" After he got the heck outta my way, the pieces actually looked like pieces of cake and not something that we just grabbed a handful of and threw on the plate!!!!

Afterwards, he said if any complained about what the first pieces looked like I could blame him. I said, "Don't worry, I will!" He left me alone after that.....Gotta love family "helpers!"

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