Any Suggestions?

Decorating By Rylan Updated 29 Apr 2009 , 10:30pm by Rylan

Rylan Posted 26 Apr 2009 , 12:49pm
post #1 of 13

First of all, THANKS for your interest to read this.

I am about to make my 3rd fondant cake. I have little experience with fondant and I am completely totally ambitious. I've only done two fondant cakes (check my photos) and both of them had original designs that didn't work out so I had to change the design during the process.


I am planning on making a life sized dress cake. Something similar to what Elisa Strauss made on the first episode of the Last Cake Standing.
I already have planned for a stand but I have tons of questions that I hope to be answered.

What type of cake can I use that would be great for carving? I'm guessing pound cakes? Can I use the original WASC recipe since I find it easier to make?

What are your tips on carving a huge cake? Do I put a thick amount of buttercream filling or a really thin one?

For people who have made a dress cake, do you have any suggestions, advice and tips?

I am hoping I can pull this off because Once I go wrong with it, then I have no choice but abandon the plan or just have to start over again.

12 replies
kakeladi Posted 26 Apr 2009 , 5:52pm
post #2 of 13

I have lots of suggestions but...... unfortunately no help icon_smile.gif
I've never done anything like that. Of course I'm partial to my original WASC icon_smile.gif But actually wondering if it will be sturdy enough for such an undertaking? That's what I would choose but not really sure........
I know, I'm lots! of help ha??? sorry just some random thought.

clovely Posted 26 Apr 2009 , 6:31pm
post #3 of 13

define "life sized"

khkakes Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 1:15am
post #4 of 13

Girl you are ambitious! I have no suggestions but can't wait to see how this one turns out!

ceshell Posted 27 Apr 2009 , 6:06am
post #5 of 13

"Totally ambitious"?! You got that right, mister! I looked at your first two fondant cakes --holy cow! So first off, I am quite certain you can pull it off. Second, there are a few threads around here listing good cakes for carving (I'd give you a link if I had one icon_redface.gif), and there is a recipe in the recipe section...use the search term "durable" and you'll get the vanilla and chocolate version. They start with a mix so if you like using WASC, you're in the same ballpark.

Anyway that's the only help I can add, as I've only done the most minor, minor carving (probably only qualifies as trimming lol.) But I just wanted to chime in and say YOU GO! and that I am totally looking forward to seeing what you come up with.

Rylan Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 7:34am
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by clovely

define "life sized"




Something the size of a dress on a mannequin you see in a window of clothing store. I was hoping for a dress above the knees.

Rylan Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 7:45am
post #7 of 13

Kekeladi I'm such a total fan of your WASC recipe. I never wanted to go back to scratch baking after discovering your recipe. Ceshell, thanks for the suggestion. I will check that out since I'm still not sure if the WASC recipe is good with carving (although its great for regular cakes).

I was wondering though, with anyone's experience, do you put a thick layer of buttercream filling or does it have to be thin? I usually put a dam between layers, Do I "carve and fill" or do "I fill and carve" (that means the dam will be cut off right?)?

I hope to hear from anyone's response since I am quite not sure what to do. I've seen a few threads but I'm not sure which one is the best method.

patticakesnc Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 7:49am
post #8 of 13

I would do a pound cake myself on that one. The WASC is great but I don't know that it would be sturdy enough for that type of cake. You need a super dense cake that isn't overly moist, so it doesn't fall apart.

Here are two wonderful recipes. I love Aunt Johnnies it is wonderful and you can make it any flavor.
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Aunt-Johnnies-Pound-Cake/Detail.aspx
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Cream-Cheese-Pound-Cake-III/Detail.aspx

I would be light on the frosting. Buttercream is heavy and that amount of cake will be heavy enough. Just use buttercream as a glue and use whatever support system you are going to use to distribute the weight.

I have never carved anything like this before...my suggestion would be if it were me, to just take your time. Go slow, cut small areas at a time. You can take more out but you cannot put it back in.

Good luck.

Rylan Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:28pm
post #9 of 13

Thanks for the recipe suggestion patticakesnc =]

If I use buttercream as glue that means I will have a really thin layer of buttercream. Do you think my cake would even taste good?

I remember reading one thread and it mentioned that carved cakes are not meant to taste great.

What can I do to have a cake taste grea with only a think layer of buttercream? I'm guessing that I would just have to do great on the dense cake itself right?

I need suggestions with this one because I really want the cake to taste good as well.

patticakesnc Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:37pm
post #10 of 13

Sure it will taste good. The Johnnies pund cake is good with no icing at all! A thin layer will just accent the flavor. Dress it up. Don't just use vanilla. I love to make my buttercream and add lemon extract to it...IT IS SOOO GOOD!

You can compliment the cake flavor you use. If you use vanilla add strawberry extract to the buttercream, etc.

But the cake itself like I said is wonderful all on its own. IMO if someone says a carved cake isn't suppose to taste good then they are using the wrong cake to begin with. A cake shouldn't taste bad without frosting.

Rylan Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 8:47pm
post #11 of 13

Gotcha. I totally never thought of making a cake taste great with the addition of a simple flavoring on the buttercream. The lemon extract sounds great. I'm definitely going for the lemon flavor. THANKS a lot.

Btw, you are totally right. The cake should taste good with or without frosting.

ceshell Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 10:22pm
post #12 of 13

Also if you want to make sure your filling really "pops", why not use a whipped ganache? If you use bittersweet chocolate, that stuff is STURDY. Or a caramel ganache (meaning, blend ganache and caramel) - also sturdy if you use a firm caramel recipe (I like JodieF's here on CC). Whipped bittersweet ganache is like cake cement! But still cuts just fine for eating thumbs_up.gif

Rylan Posted 29 Apr 2009 , 10:30pm
post #13 of 13

Oh my thanks for the suggestions ceshell. I totally have never thought of that Now I think I should make more sculpted cakes becuase I want to try all of them! I think I will definitely add different fillings on the next cake I'll be making. THANKS EVERYONE!

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