Omg-Need Help-Emergency

Decorating By bafishr Updated 25 Apr 2009 , 11:47am by solascakes

bafishr Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 2:07am
post #1 of 21

I just dropped my cake that's due tomorrow tapedshut.gificon_cry.gif It was a yellow cake, all I have is one yellow and one white icon_cry.gif i know this has been asked but as you can see I don't have time to search for the answer.

The white cake mix says to use three egg whites. I'm going to mix the yellow and white together. Can I use three eggs rather than just the egg whites. icon_cry.gif

TIA

20 replies
plbennett_8 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 2:10am
post #2 of 21

Yes. Using only "whites" in a white cake is to preserve the color. So sorry about your cake icon_sad.gif

Parable Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 2:11am
post #3 of 21

The white cake mix I use has an alternative whole egg recipe. Basically, the same. Check the box.

Lenette Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 2:18am
post #4 of 21

I don't know about the mix but I wanted to say how sorry I am that happened to you. I'll be thinking of you tonight as I am working...

Just keep your chin up and focus, you will get it done! icon_smile.gif

lainalee Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 2:29am
post #5 of 21

Sorry this happened to you. icon_cry.gif I did the same thing a while back. Just let it go and move on, it happens. icon_wink.gif

cinjam Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 2:31am
post #6 of 21

I am so sorry this happened to you. Yes, you can use three whole eggs instead of three egg whites - I've done it often. As plbennett_8 said, omitting the yolks is only to preseve the color.

Sassy74 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 2:58am
post #7 of 21

Awww...so sorry, dear! I'm glad you at least have the mixes to re-do the cake with! This is every cakers nightmare!!! Chin up! Tomorrow when you deliver, no one will know the drama you went thru!

bafishr Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:03am
post #8 of 21

Thank you for all your kind words icon_biggrin.gif I put a pot of coffee on and have started over thumbs_up.gif The thing that upsets me the most, other than I also have to work my full time job in the morning icon_cry.gif, is that I was finishing airbrushing it and only had to decorate icon_cry.gif I guess I'll be in the Friday night club.

Rylan Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:03am
post #9 of 21

I have no idea but try the WASC recipe. It calls for 3 whole eggs i believe

bafishr Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:11am
post #10 of 21

O.k. stupid question. Can I put the cake in the freezer to cool off faster, before I put on the fondant. How long does it need to stay in there? And, do I bring it back to room temp. before applying the fondant? Sorry for so many ?'s. I've never had a cake fall to the floor before and don't want to be up any later than necessary waiting for the cake to cool if there is a faster method.

aliciag829 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:17am
post #11 of 21

If it were me, I would mix the cake mixes together and use whole eggs for both boxes. I would also add a tiny tiny bit of yellow food coloring to make it more yellow.

Lenette Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:24am
post #12 of 21

I have put my cakes in the freezer to cool faster. Like this morning when I realized I had baked the wrong flavor... icon_rolleyes.gif

I have never put fondant on a frozen cake before so you might want to watch that part.

Glad to see you are keeping positive to get it all done. Sorry you have to be up for work in the AM.

marilu Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:24am
post #13 of 21

Ok, I just did a google search to find out if the freezer is safe for cooling the cake and I found this method from a yahoo answer:

"[...] this is also the answer to many chilling scenarios. The quickest way to cool any food( short of liquid nitrogen), especially a cake, is with an ice bath. That consists of taking another pan or container, even your sink, and putting ice in it. Cover the ice with water and sprinkle some salt in it (optional- it actually makes the ice water colder- gotta love science!). place the cake pan in this ice bath, making sure the water doesnt come over the edge. If there is too much water, then of course drain some. This is much quicker than putting it in the freezer or in front of the AC, as constant contact cools it quicker than just air temperature. This is the method we use in the Army to quickly cool foods in our kitchen, including cakes."

as I said... I just found it and I've never proved it but hope it helps!!

I'm so sorry about your cake, I had my first cake dissaster this week and completely understand your frustration but take a deep breath and go back to work! you can do it! icon_wink.gif

caseyhayes Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:34am
post #14 of 21

I had a hurried order yesterday and I know I did! I popped that cake out of the oven, let it set for 10 mins, took it out of the pan. I let it set for a little bit more and then put it straight into the freezer. It stayed in there long enough for me to make a homemade batch of BC. Then I took it out and decorated it right then. I've never done it but I've read that you can put fondant on a cold cake... some say it does better cold and spritz it with water and then cover with fondant and then some say they like it better room temp. Maybe someone with more experience will give you more info than i can. Good luck! Sorry that this has happened to you!

Texas_Rose Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:41am
post #15 of 21

I've put fondant on frozen mini cakes before and it will sweat for a while when applied, then eventually dry. I wouldn't suggest going that route if you need to airbrush it.

caseyhayes Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:41am
post #16 of 21

" I recently discovered the "secret combination" for covering cakes with fondant. I'm probably the last person in the world to figure it out but I found that if I chilled the cakes in the fridge for a couple of hours, spritzed them with water, then covered with fondant, and then chilled them in the fridge again, then my cakes wouldn't inflate like a balloon. If I covered a chilled cake with fondant and left it on the counter to decorate then it got all sorts of horrible air bubbles and ruined my smooth fondant. So it turns out the cake and fondant have to get to the same temperature so they don't fight each other. The cake doesn't have to stay cold either. I take it out of the fridge a a couple of hours before the party and it gets to room temperature by the time it's cut and it still looks great. It glistens a little from the condensation but I think it's a fair trade off. Chilled cakes are so much easier to cover."
Thought maybe this would help. Quote I found on Sugar Crazed's web site.

mareg Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:53am
post #17 of 21

[quote="caseyhayes"]" I recently discovered the "secret combination" for covering cakes with fondant. I'm probably the last person in the world to figure it out but I found that if I chilled the cakes in the fridge for a couple of hours, spritzed them with water, then covered with fondant, and then chilled them in the fridge again, then my cakes wouldn't inflate like a balloon. If I covered a chilled cake with fondant and left it on the counter to decorate then it got all sorts of horrible air bubbles and ruined my smooth fondant.


I didn't know about it! So you are not the last person in the world to figure it out! wow. I have a big fondant cake order coming up too!
I have a question. Why do you spritz the icing? to make it stick to the fondant? Are your cakes ready with bc for the fondant? I'm just curious and always want to learn a new trick!

caseyhayes Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 4:04am
post #18 of 21

mareg, I've never done that but I've read every thing that I can find on cakes and that was a quote that I found on Sugar Crazed website. I think she spritzed the icing to get it to stick, yes. Here's her website janellscakes.blogspot.com try that and it's posted on her topsy turvy cake tutorial. icon_biggrin.gif

marilu Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 5:34am
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by caseyhayes

I think she spritzed the icing to get it to stick, yes. Here's her website janellscakes.blogspot.com try that and it's posted on her topsy turvy cake tutorial. icon_biggrin.gif




Yes, the BC must be sticky because you want it to act like a glue to fondant. I attended American Bakery Expo last year and Colette Peters was doing a demostration there. She explained that, even if the BC is just applied to the cake and is still sticky, it is convenient to spray the cake with a little water because if you don't do so there'll be a moment when the BC sets and will no longer hold the fondant. That is the reason why some cakes loose the smooth finish they had some hours after covered with fondant. I don't know if I explained myself?
icon_rolleyes.gif

khkakes Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 11:26am
post #20 of 21

Just be careful with the water. I saw someone do this and spritzed too much and the water soaked through the fondant! It looked like the cake was crying!

An instructor told me that you can just put the cake in the fridge for awhile and then take it out and the resulting condensation would do the same thing as spritzing with water.

solascakes Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 11:47am
post #21 of 21

bafishr sorry about your cake,i'm sure you'll be able to cook up something soon with all the advise you've been given.Good luck.

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