How Do Ya'll Make Your Roses?

Decorating By Adria_NyxxTX Updated 26 Apr 2009 , 3:28am by diane

Adria_NyxxTX Posted 24 Apr 2009 , 9:36pm
post #1 of 21

At the bakery I work at we use cuticle sticks and make the petals around the stick, lift the rose off with scissors and place on the cake. I made very poor roses indeed with the flower nail and once I got the hang of doing it on the stick, I have not looked back! It's so much easier and nicer this way.

Do you use the nail or a stick?

20 replies
sari66 Posted 24 Apr 2009 , 11:38pm
post #2 of 21

I use both but perfer the stick.

indydebi Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 12:00am
post #3 of 21

I used the nail for decades ... discovered the stick method a few months ago and wow, what a difference! LUv the stick!!

queenie1958 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 12:21am
post #4 of 21

Depends on the day. Some days the nail works better for me and some days the stick works better. Its probably the icing.

mw902 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 12:30am
post #5 of 21

I dont do either, sadly I can not make a buttercream rose to save my life icon_smile.gif

LisaR64 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 12:48am
post #6 of 21

When I tried to make roses on the stick, they kept falling off. Do you build the rose at the tip of the stick, or further down the stick?

BabyBear3 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 1:08am
post #7 of 21

I've never heard of making bc roses on a stick............how do you do it???


Lisa -- your puppy is SUPER cute in that picture!!!!!!!!!!!!

Alice1230 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 1:08am
post #8 of 21

could someone please explain the stick method or point me in the direction of a tutorial?! thanks!!

Bossy Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 1:09am
post #9 of 21

I have good luck with a flower nail, and stiff froating, but after these posts I'm going to try the stick!

icer101 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 1:12am
post #10 of 21

i like and do both ways. for the stick... you have to have a good base wrapped around the stick .. you have to have a good base for the nail.. touch your stick with the 104 tip.... make several wraps around at the top.. then start with the 3 petals .. 5 petals.. then seven more if you want that many.. lots of people stop at 5 petal for their last row.. open scissors, etc... place under rose... turn stick as you lift off rose .. place rose on cake.. close scissors. some people just keep going around base on stick.. and stop when they feel like it is enough.. its just how you want to make them.. hth

blondeez Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 1:12am
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaR64

When I tried to make roses on the stick, they kept falling off. Do you build the rose at the tip of the stick, or further down the stick?





I use to have this problem. You start the center of the rose at the tip and then make the rest of the petals. Even if the petals slight fall down the stick, once you take the rose off the stick it will come out fine.

Since learning roses on a stick, I can not longer make them on a stick. Also, I find making roses on a 1/4 inch dowel rod sharped it works the best.

BabyBear3 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 1:20am
post #12 of 21




i found this that shows both methods

AmyCakes2 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 1:23am
post #13 of 21

I use a stick, but add a gumdrop to it! It gives a sturdy base and I can easily lift off the rose by taking the whole gumdrop off! icon_smile.gif

Adria_NyxxTX Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 1:38am
post #14 of 21

I do a wrap around the top of the stick and then two, five and seven petals. The petals I stick to the stick and sometimes they slide down but as stated earlier when you slide the rose off they kinda tighten up and go where they belong. The decorator before me I swear could get her petals almost an inch off the stick and they still didn't slide down! She made some wide based roses.

marmalade1687 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 12:06pm
post #15 of 21

I do my buttercream roses on a nail, but then I freeze them so that I can just lift them off and place them with my hands. Frozen, they are just like royal icing roses - I can place them wherever I want on the cake this way (even on the side of the cake) except when they come back to room temperature, you don't have to remove them to serve/cut the cake! thumbs_up.gif

solascakes Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 2:40pm
post #16 of 21

I have always used a nail and it's perfect for me.I haven't tried the stick though maybe i will.

tonedna Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 2:52pm
post #17 of 21

I have done them both ways.. I still prefer the look of the one in the nail, but the stick is really fast.
Edna icon_smile.gif

sweetjan Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 2:55pm
post #18 of 21

sorry for this, but..........do you make the standard center for the rose on the stick then let it dry overnight as usual? icon_redface.gif

weirkd Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 3:05pm
post #19 of 21

Thanks for the UTube link Babybear! I had never seen the stick method either. It was a very informative video! Not to mention made me laugh a few times!!!

MrsMabe Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 6:43pm
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalade1687

I do my buttercream roses on a nail, but then I freeze them so that I can just lift them off and place them with my hands. Frozen, they are just like royal icing roses - I can place them wherever I want on the cake this way (even on the side of the cake) except when they come back to room temperature, you don't have to remove them to serve/cut the cake! thumbs_up.gif




What a GREAT idea!! I can make really nice roses on a nail, but I can never get them to the cake without destroying them. I succeed with maybe one in ten. I'm going to start doing this. Do you stick some wax paper to the nail and do them on top of that, or stick the whole nail in the freezer?

diane Posted 26 Apr 2009 , 3:28am
post #21 of 21

i think all bakers tend to do it the way you do. i have done it both ways and think the stick method is the easiest! thumbs_up.gif

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