Price For Marzipan

Business By Cascades Updated 24 Apr 2009 , 5:35pm by LeanneW

Cascades Posted 24 Apr 2009 , 12:38am
post #1 of 5

I have a bride that wants a cake in October covered in Marzipan. She wants a ganache dripping off the sides. She wants it for 200 people.
I have no idea how to price this.!!!!

Also, I have never done marzipan before how hard is it? I have lots of time to practice. Am I getting in over my head?

I would appreciate any advice you could give me.


4 replies
Sweet_Guys Posted 24 Apr 2009 , 1:57am
post #2 of 5

We charge $2 per serving for our fondant above our $3 per serving fee for buttercream cakes. I just looked up marzipan through our wholesaler and a per pound cost is double that of fondant. Therefore, using these figures, a marzipan cake would start at $7 per serving. I would then figure out how much chocolate would be used for the gananche. We charge $16 per pound for chocolate.

Hope these figures work for you.

Paul & Peter

playingwithsugar Posted 24 Apr 2009 , 2:31am
post #3 of 5

Rolling out marzipan takes some getting used to, because it does not stretch out like fondant or gumpaste, it rolls out like a pie dough and tears even more easily. The nice part about it is that if it does tear or crack, it mends well. Another plus is that your hands will smell wonderful for a day or two. Where are our Brits when we need them? They cover cakes with marzipan all the time.
Bonjovibabe, are you out there? icon_lol.gif

Marzipan can be made from scratch, but depending on the price you pay for your almonds, it is not a profitable product to offer. This is one of the reasons why, here in the US, there are not many requests for it.

Sweet Guys - what brand of chocolate do you use for your ganache?

Theresa icon_smile.gif

Sweet_Guys Posted 24 Apr 2009 , 2:34am
post #4 of 5


We use chocoalte candy coating: a blend of Merckens and Peters.

LeanneW Posted 24 Apr 2009 , 5:35pm
post #5 of 5

if you will be covering the top with ganache anyway it might be easier to apply the rolled out marzipan like a collar. that way you don't have to deal with the hassle of smoothing it down the sides like fondant.

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