Stupid Newbie Question About Sheet Cakes

Decorating By mieyo Updated 23 Apr 2009 , 9:54pm by melvin01

mieyo Posted 23 Apr 2009 , 8:30pm
post #1 of 8

After decorating cakes for about 18 months, I've just gotten my first order for a sheet cake, and as I thought about it, I realized I have no idea how to torte, fill and stack a cake like that. My biggest concern is probably with even torting, and the stacking process -- How do you move a piece of cake that large and that thin without it breaking?

Any advice and tips will be greatly appreciated!

7 replies
tiggy2 Posted 23 Apr 2009 , 8:41pm
post #2 of 8

Use a cookie sheet with no edges on it to move it (a thin one).

Starkie Posted 23 Apr 2009 , 8:42pm
post #3 of 8

This is NOT a stupid question! I learned by trial and error, so you don't have to! What I do is I slice the cake lengthwise (plain dental floss is GREAT for this!), and then I slide my cookie sheet between the layers (my cookie sheet doesn't have a lip on the sides). When it is completely under the top layer, I lift up the cake and ice the middle. I then line up my cake and gently slide the top layer off my cookie sheet onto the rest of my cake. Works like a charm!

It may help if the cake is really cold when you do this ~ less chance of breaking. But even if it does break, just piece the top back together and frost. Nobody will ever know!

HTH!
<S>

cakesmade4u Posted 23 Apr 2009 , 8:45pm
post #4 of 8

I usually use 2 half sheets then cardboard or plexy glass to take the top layer off. Fill place the cake back by sliding it off and do it when it is cold or frozen so it don't break as easy.

blondeez Posted 23 Apr 2009 , 8:47pm
post #5 of 8

What size sheet cake is going to be?. If its a quarter sheet just level the top, cut in half and you can pick it up and move it. Anything bigger than that I would split and slide a cake board between the layers, so that you can torte the cake. If you are using BC for the filling just ice it like you would the cake. The filling layer i would make abt 1/4 inch and level as possible. If you are using a fruit or pudding filling. I would take a piping bag with BC and pipe around the edges so it looks like u have a well around your cake and then fill so that when you put the top layer back on your filling does not leak out the sides.

Hope this helps...

Win Posted 23 Apr 2009 , 8:47pm
post #6 of 8

Are you talking about an actual sheet-sized cake? And... you know the person for whom you are making it expects it to be torted?

Assuming yes to both, here's how I do it... (and others will have different ways.)

I place the cake on it's board, mark half way up with toothpicks, (making sure the cake is well chilled) I slice it in half I never go more than half on any kind of sheet.) I use Wilton cake lifters to lift the top of the cake off and set it aside. I then sprinkle a simple syrup on the lower half of the cake and fill it the same way I fill any other cake. Using the lifters again, I place the top half back on, coat the top of the cake in simple syrup then crumb coat. I place it in the fridge to chill for about an hour. After that, I apply the rest of the icing and proceed with the design. I have a Chewbacca from Star Wars to do tonight, but it is not a full sheet.

The Wilton cake lifters are great. Here's a link. I have two. If you don't have one, you could slide cardboard between the layers to lift with some stability.

http://www.joann.com/joann/catalog.jsp?CATID=cat3253&PRODID=xprd656893


I hope that makes some sort of sense to you. HTH!

RetiredNavyChief Posted 23 Apr 2009 , 8:57pm
post #7 of 8

not a stupid question.... i was about to post the same question. I am making a sheet cake tonight with a baby rump on it and was wondering how to fill a sheet that size. thanks to all of the tips.

melvin01 Posted 23 Apr 2009 , 9:54pm
post #8 of 8

I sometimes spray a little non-stick cooking spray on the sheet sometimes to help with sliding it off and on as well.

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