Sacher Torte Recipe (Chcolate Cake W/raspberry Filling)

Baking By gabbenmom Updated 20 Apr 2009 , 4:56am by gabbenmom

gabbenmom Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 10:30pm
post #1 of 5

Does anyone have a Sacher Torte Recipe with a raspberry filling? I have a coworker that has made me some very nice things out of the kindness of his heart. His girlfriend is turning 50 and would like to have one of these. Any ideas for something wonderful with chocolate and raspberry?
I greatly appreciate your help!
Thank you!

4 replies
Ursula40 Posted 20 Apr 2009 , 1:11am
post #2 of 5

200 gr soft Butter,
200 gr Icing sugar sieved
2 teaspoons natural Vanillasugar,
200 gr dark choc(Lindt),
8 eggs separated,
200 gr sieved flour,
3 Teaspoons cocoa powder,
hint salt,
1 teaspoon baking powder,
je 3 tablespoons Apricot- and Orangelikoer,
250 gr apricot jam,
200 gr dark Kouvertuere melted together with 100 gr Whipping cream
Serve with whipped cream

beat together butter and sugars till white, add 1 yolk at a time. add melted choc and cocoa then flour with baking powder. Beat egg whites till soft peak and gently fold in. Bake at 170 Celsius till done. (grease + flour 26 cm pan and use baking paper on bottom. Take out and cool completely in tin overnight, do not take out) Next day run knife around the sides and pop put of pan. Torte twice . Purie the apricot jam together with the liquers, fill each layer, stack together and also apricot all of the outside of the cake completely. Let dry overnight. On the third day warm the couverture with the cream, let cool to around room temp and pour from the middle of the cake and let run down the sides to cover cake completely. When the choc has set, place on cake plate and let the cake rest for a further 7 days in a cool room. My Grandmother placed it in her cellar. Don't scream and shout, this is an old recipe and it gets better with each day you let it rest.
A real Sacher uses Apricot Jam not raspberry. My Granny lived in Vienna for a long time and this is her original recipe

TracyLH Posted 20 Apr 2009 , 1:34am
post #3 of 5

This is a small world. Ursula, thanks so much for sharing this recipe. I can attest to what you say that the Sacher Torte does not need to be eaten immediately. I was very fortunate to be able to go to Vienna and brought a very small (trust me, very small icon_lol.gif )Sacher Torte back from the original Sacher Cafe last weekend and our family just now each got a little piece (I made them savor each bite) after dinner. It was just a delicious as the piece I had there and not dried out in the least, which surprised me. I served it with whipped cream as they did in the cafe and it was quite the very special treat. (Some people bring back souveniers - I brought my children food. icon_lol.gif Yes, you can split a Viennese chocolate truffle three ways!)) I told my children to savor that little Sacher Torte as it has it took me over 40 years to get there. icon_lol.gif

I also went to Demel and watched the work in their bakery they have behind glass. It was interesting in that in one area it appeared that they were working on their Sacher Torte and they were at the stage before the chocolate exterior. They took each one out of it's box and carefully flipped it upside down into a large bowl and then set it upright. Unfortunately, I didn't speak Austrian and don't know what the liquid was, but I will say it was very interesting to watch. I am not a 'caker' but a 'cookier', but I guessed it was some sort of flavored simple syrup before the chocolate would go one, but again, I am not a cake expert. However, I was amazed the cake held together with the process. Of course, I could be off and that may not have been their Sacher Torte at all, but it looked to be the same size.

Thanks again for sharing your grandmother's recipe! It will be the closest I will get to Vienna again! icon_smile.gif

Ursula40 Posted 20 Apr 2009 , 1:40am
post #4 of 5

Let me know what you think of the recipe, if you've tried it. Secret is use the best choc that you can and really let it rest. I make this cake for my birthday every year and I bake it usually 10 - 11 days beforehand. It is an extremely heavy cake but sooooo good. Cut it before the 10th day and it's liable to be dry

gabbenmom Posted 20 Apr 2009 , 4:56am
post #5 of 5

Ursula, thank you so much! This is wonderful! I can't wait to try it! He said she like apricot too. I used to work in a French restaraunt and the Sacher always had raspberry. I will have to try it with apricot!
Thank you again so much for sharing!!!! Her birthday is Friday, so I don't have time for this to properly age. That means I will just have to make it for me!!!

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