Advise On Piping???

Decorating By buckeyecakes Updated 17 Apr 2009 , 4:07pm by buckeyecakes

buckeyecakes Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:10pm
post #1 of 13

I have recently begun decorating (currently taking Wilton courses), and my mother has been a huge source of encouragement for me. Her Birthday is May 1st, and I want to show her my appreciation by making her a surprise cake.

Mom LOVES Phantom of the Opera, so my idea is to make a two teired cake/covered in black fondant. I have made a gumpaste red rose and Phantom mask to place on the top of the cake. I want to add a music staff winding around (and down) the sides of the cake - my mom reads music so I will use the actual score from the title song. However, my piping skills still need improvement (I know it takes practice) but since I am running short on time - does anyone have any advise on how to pipe straight lines (without the "wavy" look)?? TIA for any suggestions.

12 replies
varika Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:17pm
post #2 of 13

Take a piece of dental floss and stretch it across the cake between your fingers. Press it down lightly, and it should mark a line in your fondant that you can use as a guide. If it only has to be a short piece, you can use a toothpick and a straight-edge--don't lay the straight-edge on the cake, just hold it and use it as a guide as you scratch your line lightly with the toothpick.

This works on regular icing, too.

RandomCakes Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:18pm
post #3 of 13

Never done this before, but the first thought that came to my mind was cutting strips from parchment or wax paper (thin, like the spaces between the music) and wrap them around the cake and pipe between them. Then when you pull it off, it should look like music bars. Make sure you do this after the buttercream is "crusty", otherwise it will just pull the frosting off.

HTH!

buckeyecakes Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:23pm
post #4 of 13

Both are great ideas - thank you!!!! icon_biggrin.gif

psurrette Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:25pm
post #5 of 13

Do you have a clay gun you can make skinny strips with?

T_bird1 Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:27pm
post #6 of 13

I"ve also tried putting a touch of corn syrup in the icing makes it a little
more pliable I think icon_smile.gif Good Luck

BCJean Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:29pm
post #7 of 13

When piping lines like this, hold the bag with your right hand and use the index finger of your left hand to steady it by gently touching it to the bag, just above the tip.
Another trick, if you stand with your feet about 12 inches apart....when you have to shift your weight to continue the line...you will not get off balance and can continue with the line without stopping.
....also, concentrate on where you are going with the line, look at the next point and go straight to it...then go on to the next point. You don't want to look at what you are currently doing, but where you are going with it.

mamacc Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:39pm
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BCJean

When piping lines like this, hold the bag with your right hand and use the index finger of your left hand to steady it by gently touching it to the bag, just above the tip.
Another trick, if you stand with your feet about 12 inches apart....when you have to shift your weight to continue the line...you will not get off balance and can continue with the line without stopping.
....also, concentrate on where you are going with the line, look at the next point and go straight to it...then go on to the next point. You don't want to look at what you are currently doing, but where you are going with it.




This is great advice. Also, you'll probably want to use either a tip 0 or 00....or a parchment paper cone.

RandomCakes Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:50pm
post #9 of 13

Or, just thought of this, you could measure out how big around the cake is, measure it out on wax paper, use a straight edge or ruler, start at the top, and pipe out the lines and notes on the wax paper. Basically, like a Frozen Butter Cream Transfer. Then you can wrap it around the cake, like you would with pleats or stripes on the side of a cake. Plus, if you mess up, you don't mess up your cake.

SweetMelissa2007 Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 1:04am
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandomCakes

Or, just thought of this, you could measure out how big around the cake is, measure it out on wax paper, use a straight edge or ruler, start at the top, and pipe out the lines and notes on the wax paper. Basically, like a Frozen Butter Cream Transfer. Then you can wrap it around the cake, like you would with pleats or stripes on the side of a cake. Plus, if you mess up, you don't mess up your cake.


That is a great idea RandomCakes! I would never have thought of it!!

MrsMabe Posted 16 Apr 2009 , 2:45pm
post #11 of 13

I'm new, this is my first post on this forum. Hope I'm not intruding.
I had to do a cake with a musical staff. I used one of those spatula's with the scoring edges (like the following link but with bigger teeth) http://www.sugarcraft.com/catalog/misc/PC54.jpg .
I lightly dragged that along where I wanted the staff, then traced over the grooves with frosting. I did it on BC though, so I don't know if it'd work on fondant.

MrsMabe Posted 16 Apr 2009 , 2:49pm
post #12 of 13

Oops, didn't realize I couldn't put URLs. Maybe this will work:
http:// www. sugarcraft .com/catalog/misc/RDC-1.jpg

(it says sugercraft where it's blocked)

buckeyecakes Posted 17 Apr 2009 , 4:07pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandomCakes

Or, just thought of this, you could measure out how big around the cake is, measure it out on wax paper, use a straight edge or ruler, start at the top, and pipe out the lines and notes on the wax paper. Basically, like a Frozen Butter Cream Transfer. Then you can wrap it around the cake, like you would with pleats or stripes on the side of a cake. Plus, if you mess up, you don't mess up your cake.




Thank you so much for this suggestion - I did a practice run - and it worked wonderfully. icon_biggrin.gif

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