How Would You Achieve This Look?

Decorating By Walls1971 Updated 16 Apr 2009 , 4:51pm by FlourPots

Walls1971 Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 5:56pm
post #1 of 21

I've been booked for a wedding in June and the bride has given me this picture as a basis for the cake she wants. It seems simple enough; however, the more I look at it, the more I'm not sure about it. How would you achieve the scalloped edge? And do you think that is fondant wrapped around each layer? or a fondant/gumpaste mix? Or something else that might be easier to get into a huge strip like that to go around a larger layer? My main concerns are getting the fondant (or whatever) in a large enough, smooth enough strip to go around the entire cake and achieving the scalloped look. Here is a picture of the example she sent me:

http://weddings.theknot.com/gallery/gallery_details.aspx?gallery=18&itemnumber=3

Any tips would be greatly appreciated!

Heather

20 replies
__Jamie__ Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 6:01pm
post #2 of 21

Scalloped edge....border cutter, like a scrapbook paper punch, or there are actual fondant cutters too. The dots with the impression around them, you could press something slightly larger with a flat round surface into the fondant, leaving a bit of a depression and then stick your fondant disk onto that.

I highly doubt that is anything but fondant or chocolate dough. Other wise, you'd be peeling it off.

You could just lay a piece of black down on the tops, onlly extending just far enough over the edges so the wrap covers the seam.

Walls1971 Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 6:26pm
post #3 of 21

I've never used chocolate dough or modeling chocolate before. . . is there a benefit to using it over something like fondant? Or are they basically the same thing, speaking logistically? If I could find something that would be easier to use for making a large strip that goes around the sides of a cake (basically a 'ribbon'), I'd rather use it. My biggest fear is having to use two (or more) pieces of fondant to make it around the cake. Or are my sights set too high?

Sometimes I think I'm over thinking this cake. . . icon_rolleyes.gif

beachcakes Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 6:28pm
post #4 of 21

It's a frill cutter. This will make your life easier http://www.globalsugarart.com/product.php?id=18810

Walls1971 Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 6:34pm
post #5 of 21

Ah ha! Thank you, Beachcakes! That looks exactly like the picture thumbs_up.gif

Still looking for tips/advice on how to do the wrap-around. . . If this wasn't a wedding cake, I don't think I'd be fretting it so much.

Thanks again!

__Jamie__ Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 6:34pm
post #6 of 21

Frill cutter!! That's what I was trying to think of!

jlynnw Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 6:45pm
post #7 of 21

measure the height of your cake, and the circumference around. roll out your foundant to this measurement. Cut the scallop top and roll up on a small rolling pin. Moisten the cake that has the fondant already on it, or bc, stand rolling pin straight up and unroll while turning the cake. This works best with 2 people. One for cake one on fondant. Line up back seam and finish. It sounds a lot harder that reallity. HTH

__Jamie__ Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 6:50pm
post #8 of 21

jlyynw....that sounds exactly right...and yes, if you can picture it, it isn't that hard, but definitely an extra set of hands to smooth as you unwrap!

Walls1971 Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 7:13pm
post #9 of 21

That doesn't sound TOO difficult. . .thanks for the tips. Looks like I'll need to talk someone into coming to help me that day!

jlynnw Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 7:52pm
post #10 of 21

It really doesn't take that long to do the final unwrap. Just make sure you start with the back seam straight. Post pics when your done!

SweetMelissa2007 Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 1:27am
post #11 of 21

It may be a little easier to apply the wrap using a piece of acetate or clear contact paper to wrap the fondant or chocolate dough around the cake. Roll it out on the acetate, scallop your top border with the frill cutter, wet the fondant on the cake and place the rolled piece on acetate against the cake. Hold the first edge against the "wet" cake and peel it off slowly around the cake. Good Luck! HTH

SweetMelissa2007 Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 1:30am
post #12 of 21

It may be a little easier to apply the wrap using a piece of acetate or clear contact paper to wrap the fondant or chocolate dough around the cake. Roll it out on the acetate, scallop your top border with the frill cutter, wet the fondant on the cake and place the rolled piece on acetate against the cake. Hold the first edge against the "wet" cake and peel it off slowly around the cake. Good Luck! HTH

stylist7 Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 2:51am
post #13 of 21

this to me dosent look like a strip, but more like a large piece of fondant rolled long, scalloped(they have many tools for that) and placed up on a black cake, almost like a coat or cover... which in fact is more attractive, easier, and elligant....all you have to do is mend one seam in the back of the cake

jlynnw Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 3:03am
post #14 of 21

yes, that is exactly what we are saying

Toptier Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 3:48am
post #15 of 21

I would use chocolate modeling paste/dough for this over fondant. The modeling paste doesn't stretch as much as fondant and will keep it's shape better.

deliciously_decadent Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 7:35am
post #16 of 21

ok so cover all tiers in black fondant then cuff the edges in a white fondant strip that you have edged qith a cutter then appyl your black polka dots to the two polka dot tiers and add your fondant ribbon and bow to the two other tiers, very simple whe you break it down, love the design too!!

deliciously_decadent Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 7:40am
post #17 of 21

oh forgot to add that i find it easier to mark a stright line on my cake before i unwrap my fondant ribbon so you have a guide to stop you going on the wrong angle icon_smile.gif

Walls1971 Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 1:13pm
post #18 of 21

I definitely appreciate all the comments. . . sometimes I need to 'talk' out a strategy before I take on a cake. I wondered about using acetate; I think that might be easier than the rolling pin, as it shouldn't slide down like it might on the pin. Heaven knows I've had that happen more than once. An assistant is the best idea I've heard - I'd love one of those anyway! I've never used chocolate dough/modeling chocolate before. How is the taste?

For my fondant, I typically use MMF, but it is just going to be way too soft for this job. I'll have to buy some fondant, if I go that route. That way it will be stiffer and smoother and give me a more elegant appearance.

SweetMelissa2007 Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 2:57pm
post #19 of 21

I think the modeling chocolate tastes good (esp white chocolate thats my favorite) Its kind of like soft tootsie rolls that taste just like white chocolate!! YUM!

deliciously_decadent Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 9:08pm
post #20 of 21

i use a dowel to do my thin robbons, i just roll it around the dowel (make sure it is disted with icing sugar first so it doesn't stick) then have the cake on a rotating /spinnable cake turntable so that you unroll the dowel as you turn your cake, i find a skinny light dowel is much easier to manover and handle by yourself (no assistance here lol) than a bulky heavy rollingpin

FlourPots Posted 16 Apr 2009 , 4:51pm
post #21 of 21

Walls...I knew I had seen an almost exact replica of that cake here at CC...check this out: http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=62853

There's some helpful information in the description and comment areas, and of course you could try PM-ing the decorator for further assistance.

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