For Those That Have Quit Smoking

Lounge By Larrimore Updated 17 Apr 2009 , 11:21pm by Luby

Larrimore Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 6:19pm
post #1 of 24

Do you have any tips, advise, secrets to share of how you completely broke the habit, physically & mentally? I have began taking Chantix today (finally remembered to ask dr for prescription).

I tried to quit smoking 5 years ago but that only lasted for maybe a week. Too much going on at that time in my life and I picked it back up, along with sugar and carbs. icon_mad.gif During that time though, I could 'feel' the cigarette between my fingers and I really needed something to do with my hands. Tried holding a pencil but that did not help. Could not go for a walk cause I was also recouperating from surgery.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated cause I really really want to be successful this time.

23 replies
springlakecake Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 11:16pm
post #2 of 24

I have never smoked, but I just wanted to pop in an be supportive! I think it is great that you want to quit smoking! I will let other folks who have been there give you the advice. But I wish you all the best!

maryjsgirl Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 12:16am
post #3 of 24

The majority of my family has quit thanks to acupuncture. It is a little costly, but way cheaper than a year supply of cigarettes, lol. I always thought it was hokey, but after seeing so many quit for years I believe it works.

sarahpierce Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 1:09am
post #4 of 24

I'm trying to quit too. It's really hard!! We should start a CC quit smoking support thread, like the weight loss one. Any ideas for a name?
I started smoking when I was 12 icon_eek.gif . Sad isn't it? So this year will make 17 years that I've smoked. Mince the times I quit while pregnant ( don't smoke around the kids or in the house). What makes it harder to quit is the fact that DH smokes. He's supportive, but I can still smell it.

I live in Wisconsin and our tax just went up. A pack of Camels are now $6 a pack. I can't afford that. No one can. I've cut back to a few a day, but I can't quit completely. This sound stupid, but I don't know who I am without cigarettes. icon_confused.gif .

Careful with the Chantix. I heard it gives you really bad dreams, and other side effects. Also, if you don't take it for the full time prescribed it won't work - ever. But, on the other side I know a man who smoked 2 packs a day for 20 plus years and was able to quit on the medicine. He also eats a lot of sunflower seeds in the shell to keep him busy and it lessens the craving.

Good luck. I'm here for you! thumbs_up.gif

butternut Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 1:04pm
post #5 of 24

I quit smoking more than 30 years ago and never looked back. It was actually one of the easiest things I've ever done. I too started when I was very young, around age 14. Smoked for about 5 years and then saw family members get lung cancer and die a horrible, painful death due to their smoking. That was enough for me to see what I needed to do. Yes, people can still get lung cancer without ever having smoked a cigarette but it's much, more likely to get it if you do smoke and are around it. Just recently I've seen friends and more family members pass away from this and even more showing signs of this happening. So sad and so needless. I encourage you with all my heart to continue your battle to end this destructive behavior. I know that you want to be around for a while for your family and friends. There are so many diseases and illnesses that we have absolutely no control over. Getting lung cancer due to our choice of smoking is one thing we can control. Take control of your life and what you put into your body. You can do it. Absolutely you can do it and know what? I bet you're worth it!!!

Larrimore Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 3:01pm
post #6 of 24

Thank you merissa, maryjsgirl, butternut and sarahpierce for the support! And yeah, butternut, I AM worth it!

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We should start a CC quit smoking support thread, like the weight loss one. Any ideas for a name?




I love this idea!

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I started smoking when I was 12 icon_eek.gif . Sad isn't it? So this year will make 17 years that I've smoked.




I too started smoking when I was 12, because of a dare from my sister. icon_surprised.gif How stupid was that. I am 44 now, and she quit smoking a few years ago.

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I live in Wisconsin and our tax just went up. A pack of Camels are now $6 a pack. I can't afford that. No one can. I've cut back to a few a day, but I can't quit completely.




I live in SC and they just went up here too. And yeah, with DH not working as much, I can't afford my bad habit any longer. But I mostly want to quit cause I am tired of the doctor's office lately, and I hate the smell of it. Weird huh

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This sound stupid, but I don't know who I am without cigarettes. icon_confused.gif .




Does not sound stupid at all. I know exactly what you mean.

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Careful with the Chantix. I heard it gives you really bad dreams, and other side effects. Also, if you don't take it for the full time prescribed it won't work - ever. But, on the other side I know a man who smoked 2 packs a day for 20 plus years and was able to quit on the medicine. He also eats a lot of sunflower seeds in the shell to keep him busy and it lessens the craving.




I am not a person to dream, but I think my ulcer medicine is already making this happen. Just started the Chantix yesterday, and I have been dreaming every night for a couple of weeks now. Don't like it either. Also, my friend that was on Chantix did warn me about the dreams. So, we will see if they get worse.

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Good luck. I'm here for you! thumbs_up.gif




I too am here for you! We CAN do this!

dldbrou Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 3:23pm
post #7 of 24

My son recently quit smoking. He was looking into using Chantix also, but was not comfortable with the side effect that could make him depressed. Instead he opted to chew gum. He uses Listerine gum. It is strong flavor and it has a container that he can hold like a cig. He first kept the same habits of when he smoked, but just popped the gum in his mouth instead of a cig. Then he broke the habit of pulling something out of his pocket and going walking outside after eating or when stressed. Most people try to break the smoking habit along with the physical habit at the same time. For my son, he chose to break them separately if that makes sense. Also, to support him, we as a family left him along when he needed to go outside and chew his gum, we never made fun of him or ask him why. It was one day at a time. Also, doing it this way, he was not very irritable as my husband was when he quit smoking cold turkey.

Good Luck and great choice.

P.S., You might need to get your car or any furniture that can absorb orders professionally cleaned to get rid of the order so that you won't be tempted by the smell. Your sense of smell will probably intensify after you quit.

PattyLen Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 3:27pm
post #8 of 24

Yea for you! My husband smoked two packs a day for over 30 years. When my mother was diagnosed with lung cancer (she never smoked in her entire life) and died, he decided to quit.

He used Chantix. Yes, there were some side effects. Was it worth it? Absolutely. It worked so well that he didn't have to take the full course of pills.

He learned that he had to change many of his routines. For instance, he used to sit on the back porch to do crossword puzzles and smoke because I wouldn't let him smoke in the house. For one year he didn't step on the back porch. Also, he always had a cigarette with a cup of coffee, now he has stopped drinking coffee.

He did however pick up the quirky habit of chewing on toothpicks. I guess it was a change in the oral fixation. Now, I find them everywhere, in his jeans pockets, coat pockets, washing machine, dryer, bedside table, kitchen sink. Hey, I'll take toothpicks over a nasty old ashtray any day.

It can be done. Good luck to you.

TexasSugar Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 10:41pm
post #9 of 24

My parents used Chantix to quit smoking and they haven't picked up a cigarette in about 16 months.

My mom will be the first to say there are still days she wants a cigarette. She can also relate to PattyLen's hubby about wanting one out of habit. They recently started working out in the back yard since the weather has turned nice. She was saying this weekend that she thinks about them when she stops to take a break. Before they would take a break, drink some coffee or water and smoke. Now they leave that part out.

My grandma quit cold turkey many, many years ago. What was her motivation? My grandpa told her he would get her a dishwasher if she did. She wanted that dishwasher! That was before the gums, pills and patches. And she has never smoked again.

You can do it! Good luck!

cakedoll Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:35pm
post #10 of 24

I quit for 2 years and started up again. How's that for dumb? I'm down to about 5 a day now and chew lots of gum in between. It's not the craving so much with me. If I have to, I can go 8 hours without a problem. It's the habit.

s_barnes76 Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 4:25am
post #11 of 24

I was a smoker for 11 years. I started when I was 16, quit when I was pregnant with my first child, then started again. In Sept. of '02, my FIL was diagnosed with cancer. He was a heavy smoker for years. The day they found the cancer, he literally went from the Dr's office to the hospital, where they removed his vocal cords. He had had the cancer for months before it was discovered. I guess you could say that was the beginning of my wake up call. I had tried to quit, but things were so stressful, I just couldn't. In April of '03 I found out I was pregnant...I quit immediately. My FIL died 2 weeks later. The combination of being pregnant and seeing him die an awful death was more than enough to stop me in my tracks.

Did I ever have days where I wanted to smoke? You bet. Even though the smell of cigarette smoke chokes me now, I still get the urge every now and then. I know it will be hard, but you can do it!! Just think of all the money you'll save icon_wink.gif

Larrimore Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 3:43pm
post #12 of 24

Thank you all so much for such positive success stories. s_barnes76, I am so sorry about your FIL. Cakedoll, I totally understand the habit! I told my DH last night that I needed something for my hands, so I would not reach for a cigarette at work when bored. At home it is different. Only allowed to smoke in certain areas.

TexasSugar, I am hoping that the yard work/garden with help with the withdrawal. HMMM...dishwasher huh...wonder if my DH would offer a VW would it help? lol

sarahpierce Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 4:09pm
post #13 of 24

I work 3rd shift, so my days start at 8 p.m. and go until about 2 p.m. the next day. So, here's my Confession Of The Day (COTD):

I have already smoked 5 cigs, and will probably have one more before bed icon_sad.gif . The smell is getting stronger and worse as I cut back. My hands stink of smoke right now, but I'm not washing them yet because the smell reminds me of why I want to quit. Things are real stressful at work right now, and frankly I'm using that as an excuse to not cut back more.

O.k. who else feels like confessing?

BTW I can't wait to start working in my yard either. The winter was so hard on our lawn this year. The whole thing looks like crap! thumbsdown.gif

Larrimore Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 6:14pm
post #14 of 24

I will fess up! I have smoked more than you have today icon_sad.gif My only saving grace is I did tell the boss this morning when he bummed a cigarette off of me was that he could not smoke in the office. The look on his face was priceless I have to admit. So, he did go outside. And when his wife walked over later to get one, I told her the same thing, she could not smoke it in the office. So she took it and went back home. On the bright side, if they keep smoking my cigarettes I will not have any left. YEA!!!! Kinda hard to smoke one when you don't have one right?

I HAVE to find something to reach for, especially when I am at work and have gotten caught up with everything and the phones are not ringing. DH and I were going to look for something in Wal-Mart last night, but the pharmacy took so long we were eager to get out of there.

Come on sarahpierce, we CAN do this

TexasSugar Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 8:09pm
post #15 of 24

One thing with the Chantix and smoking is it takes away the good feelings smoking gives ya. I think my parents had put down the pack after the first set of pills.

As far as something to do with your hands... Do you know how to crochet or knit? If not, do you know anyone that knows that could teach you? Crocheted Granny squares are easy to work on anywhere, and are usually easy to put down in the middle of it if you need to do something else.

TC123 Posted 16 Apr 2009 , 12:51am
post #16 of 24

My mom just celebrated 1 year without smoking. Yay!!!!!! She quit cold turkey. She kept glasses of water handy to help with her wanting to hold/smoke a cigarette. A friend of mine used Chantix (had suffered horrible side effects, though, so PLEASE be careful with this, okay?); but he's now a non-smoker too! Anyway, I think one of my mom's motivators when it felt really hard to stay committed was wanting to be around for her grandchildren, to be with them and watch them grow up.

Like TexasSugar, I told my mom to crochet, which is what I spend most of my free time doing. Knitting and crocheting keep both hands (and your mind!) busy. thumbs_up.gif

My best wishes and blessings to all of you who are working towards quitting. I believe that all of you can do it!!! icon_smile.gif

Larrimore Posted 16 Apr 2009 , 2:46pm
post #17 of 24

oohh! TexasSugar & TCarra, crocheting is such a wonderful idea...it could be done at work and I don't think it would be a big distraction, just something to do. And it is affordable.I have to go to town tonight so I will pick up some yarn and a crochet needle. Thank you!

Rosetta Posted 16 Apr 2009 , 3:22pm
post #18 of 24

Hi, this is my first post here icon_biggrin.gif ... and I am off-topic already lol

I used to smoke 30 / 40 a day and gave up three years ago. I gave up cold turkey and while it wasn't easy it wasn't as bad as I thought. I used this site www.whyquit.com and found it brilliant - the guy who runs it is called Joel and has years of experience as a quitting counsellor. There is a forum, which is difficult to join, but has loads and loads of information. You need to really be dedicated to your quit and read and read and read the information he has.

It worked for me and I think a lot of other people find it brilliant too.

Rosetta

Larrimore Posted 16 Apr 2009 , 3:25pm
post #19 of 24

Welcome to CC Rosetta! I will definately check out the website.

TexasSugar Posted 16 Apr 2009 , 7:18pm
post #20 of 24

Larrimore and TCarra, have ya'll heard of Crochetville.org? icon_wink.gif

TC123 Posted 17 Apr 2009 , 12:09am
post #21 of 24

Ooooo!!! Not to hijack this thread but I'm goin' ta check it out right now. Thanks so much!!! icon_razz.gif

TexasSugar Posted 17 Apr 2009 , 2:12am
post #22 of 24

HeHe, well I was thinking if I shared it Larrimon would have tons and tons of ideas of things to crochet. icon_wink.gif

And no blaming me if you end up finding yourself spending alot of time there!

Melvira Posted 17 Apr 2009 , 3:31am
post #23 of 24

I have been smoke free for almost nine years, and it all comes down to one word... Zyban. I am not kidding you, that stuff is like a miracle. My first day with no cigs was sad, the second too, the third day I cried a little, the fourth day I was a non-smoker. It's weird to me to think that I used to smoke. Sometimes I forget, isn't that silly? If you are a smoker and you want to quit (GOD BLESS YOU, DO IT!!) talk to your Doc about Zyban. It does require a scrip, but it works miracles. But, like anything else, you have to want to do it. No one can make you do it. As for occupying your hands... um... cake decorating?? Hehehe. Seriously, I used sugar free hard candy, gum, etc. to occupy my mouth, then did crochet, type, play piano, things like that to occupy my hands.

Luby Posted 17 Apr 2009 , 11:21pm
post #24 of 24
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Originally Posted by Melvira

I have been smoke free for almost nine years, and it all comes down to one word... Zyban. I am not kidding you, that stuff is like a miracle. My first day with no cigs was sad, the second too, the third day I cried a little, the fourth day I was a non-smoker. It's weird to me to think that I used to smoke. Sometimes I forget, isn't that silly? If you are a smoker and you want to quit (GOD BLESS YOU, DO IT!!) talk to your Doc about Zyban. It does require a scrip, but it works miracles. But, like anything else, you have to want to do it. No one can make you do it. As for occupying your hands... um... cake decorating?? Hehehe. Seriously, I used sugar free hard candy, gum, etc. to occupy my mouth, then did crochet, type, play piano, things like that to occupy my hands.




I smoked for over 30 years and have been smoke-free for the last 6 years. I'm a walking Zyban commercial. I'm not saying that if you take Zyban you will never want to smoke again - I'm saying that if you are in the right frame of mind and determined not to smoke Zyban will take the edge off the nicotine fits and enable to you to control them. When I gave up cigs for good I felt like I was losing my best friend. It is a psychological addiction as well as a physical addiction. I truly believe the psychological addiction is more difficult to deal with than the physical addiction. Like Melvira, I was sad at times and I cried a few times, but my resolve was stronger and the urge would eventually pass. When you feel a nicotine urge starting you have to find something to do to keep yourself busy until it passes. Yes, Zyban is expensive, but look at the price of cigarettes today.
Good luck and I also believe that quitting takes a lot of planning and it's all about you during this time.

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