Delivery A 4 Tier Cake

Decorating By pickles777 Updated 13 Apr 2009 , 7:03pm by sgauta

pickles777 Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 4:27pm
post #1 of 12


If I have to travel about 10 minutes with a 4 tier cake, would you feel comfortable driving with the whole cake stacked? Or would you recommend putting it together on site? If on site, would you put 2 tiers together and the other 2, then stack? Let me know any thoughts or ideas please.



11 replies
imamommy1205 Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 4:53pm
post #2 of 12

I would put it together on site. I have never traveled with a tiered cake, so I might just leave all the layers separate.

yh9080 Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 5:31pm
post #3 of 12

I think it would be fine to travel with it already stacked. Just remember to dowel it well and to put a center dowel all the way through.

However, just remember that a cakes that size is very heavy and be sure that you can carry it by yourself or have someone helping you that can.

Personally, if it were me, I would travel in separate layers but only because I wouldn't be able to carry it in already stacked.

sweetcakes Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 5:46pm
post #4 of 12

as long as you're confident in your support system and you can lift and carry it then take it completely stacked. For 4 tiers i have to get my hubby to help with the cake, getting it into the car and from the car to the table.

PinkZiab Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 5:48pm
post #5 of 12

I deliver all of my cakes stacked. If it's supported and constructed properly you shouldn't have any problems, especially with such a quick drive. If it would be too large/heavy for your to deliver on your own (assuming there will be no one to assist you), then, stack the bottom 2 tiers, but have all the other tiers prepped for stacking (dowels--or whatever you are using--already in the cake) to make quick work of finishing it when you get there.

sgauta Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 5:57pm
post #6 of 12

I just delivered a 4-tier cake this weekend completely assembled (it was about a 20 minute drive). Due to the nature of the detail work on the cake, I felt better having it completely assembled when it arrived. It had all the necessary dowels in place and I did have help getting it out of the car and onto the cake table (it was HEAVY!). Like someone else said, if the support system is strong and you have help, it should be fine completely assembled but if you feel better stacking on site, maybe have your bottom two tiers and top two stacked and just stack the two sections when you get there.


aligotmatt Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 6:07pm
post #7 of 12

I would take it stacked. As long as it's stacked properly, you should have no issues. Also, no crazy driving! Take turns easy, accelerate slow, and leave plenty of time to stop.

Depending on your venue, when you arrive, you may be able to go in and get a rolling kitchen cart. Wheel it out to your vehicle, lift the cake, move it to the cart, then wheel it on in to the cake table.

tonedna Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 6:14pm
post #8 of 12

All my cakes are delivered stacke.. You have to make sure the support system is strong. And keep in mind that they are heavy. When you move them, make sure not to tilt them, make sure they are always carried in a straight position, and dont tilt while you are puttin it on the table..slide it to the center..
Edna icon_smile.gif

Mencked Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 6:15pm
post #9 of 12

I always like to deliver wedding cakes totally assembled if at all possible! I love the SPS system, but if you don't have that available, wilton plastic dowels in the bottom tiers work just great, then wooden dowel through all layers. I routinely travel over really horrible bumpy Oklahoma roads and I must say that cakes, when properly supported are really quite stable! The weight can be an issue, but I have my husband who has nicknamed himself "Lumer the Cake Boy" to help with that issue. I just don't like Grandma Nettie, the mother of the groom, great aunt Doris and cute little cousin Stephy, watching me put my cake together icon_smile.gif. Plus I prefer to get there, deliver and be gone ASAP!!

bettimont Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 6:24pm
post #10 of 12

I found out the hard way to make sure you know your route. I had to deliver a cake to a banquet hall on top of a steep hill. I hadn't been to this hall but knew about where it was and I had very good directions. The hill was not mentioned. The back way to the banquet hall the hill wasn't as steep. I wish I had know that! I had the cake well supported but it still slipped a bit.

tonedna Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 6:47pm
post #11 of 12

Here is the basics of stacking a 4 tier cake..

Edna icon_smile.gif

sgauta Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 7:03pm
post #12 of 12

LOL Mencked -- I also don't like people watching me finish the assembly. Sometimes a little crowd will accumulate and they start asking a lot of questions which is distracting. It's nervewracking enough having everyone stare at you when you're just trying to get the cake on the table! I therefore like to just drop and go!


Quote by @%username% on %date%