Springform Pan/cheesecake Question

Decorating By Kitagrl Updated 14 Apr 2009 , 2:06am by kjgjam22

Kitagrl Posted 12 Apr 2009 , 2:54am
post #1 of 8

Okay so I've made a couple of cheesecakes but seems like every time there is SOMEthing that goes a bit wrong.

The first time back at Christmas I made one IN a water bath, with foil around the springform pan. Tough luck, the water still seeped through. Made a second one, putting a pan of water in the oven with it, and although it did crack, it turned out yummy otherwise.

Today made a cheesecake for us for tomorrow...and while this particular recipe turned out beautifully (so far) and smooth without cracks, it seemed some butter or something was leaking out of the (crust?) bottom of the springform onto the bottom of my oven and smoking something awful, hope the cheesecake does not absorb any of the smoke odor. So we wiped out the bottom of the oven twice and then put a pan to catch further dripping.

Anything else I need to know regarding the perils of using a springform pan? LOL....

7 replies
xstitcher Posted 12 Apr 2009 , 4:28am
post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Okay so I've made a couple of cheesecakes but seems like every time there is SOMEthing that goes a bit wrong.

The first time back at Christmas I made one IN a water bath, with foil around the springform pan. Tough luck, the water still seeped through. Made a second one, putting a pan of water in the oven with it, and although it did crack, it turned out yummy otherwise.

Today made a cheesecake for us for tomorrow...and while this particular recipe turned out beautifully (so far) and smooth without cracks, it seemed some butter or something was leaking out of the (crust?) bottom of the springform onto the bottom of my oven and smoking something awful, hope the cheesecake does not absorb any of the smoke odor. So we wiped out the bottom of the oven twice and then put a pan to catch further dripping.

Anything else I need to know regarding the perils of using a springform pan? LOL....




I just made my first one but did not have a springform pan so I made it in my reg cake pan. I greased the sides with melted butter first then lined them with parchment paper. Once the cake had been chilled in the fridge, I reheated the bottom of the pan by placing it in hot water in the sink for about 10-15 seconds to re-melt the butter (make sure you put it in gently so you don't splash any water into your pan (ask me how I know icon_lol.gif ). Then take a knife and go around the edges of the pan to make sure the cake has not stuck anywhere, remove parchment if you lined the sides as well and then put a piece of wax paper (saran wrap would probably work to) on top of the cheesecake. Ontop of the wax paper put a cake board and then flip the whole thing over. Your cheesecake will of course be upside down at this point so you'll have to flip it one more time onto it's final resting place.
This way if you choose to bake your cheesecake in a water bath (I didn't ) then you will not have to worry about seepage. Or you don't have to go and get special pans either.

zdebssweetsj Posted 12 Apr 2009 , 4:44am
post #3 of 8

I never use spring form pans any more for cheese cakes, I use reg pans and line them with parchment paper. But Ido bake mine in a water bath. I just use a pan about 4" larger, place a small towel under your pan then place it in oven pour hot water into pan about 1/2 full, I never have any problem with cracks ever!!. I've even used other type pans such as Christmas tree pans instead of lining them I coat it in butter and the lightly coat it with graham cracker crumbs. Works great.

sjholderman Posted 12 Apr 2009 , 4:46am
post #4 of 8

When I make them I use a double layer of extra long foil, this keeps the water out completely. If you can't find really long foil, I've used duck tape to seal out the water completely with no ill effects.
About the butter, I use a firm recipe (from the Cake Bible) that I can flip over and pat on a graham cracker/butter/brown sugar mixture for a crust. I've never tried baking a cheesecake with a crust, but I would assume if the foil keeps water out it'll keep butter in icon_smile.gif

xstitcher Posted 12 Apr 2009 , 4:57am
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjholderman

When I make them I use a double layer of extra long foil, this keeps the water out completely. If you can't find really long foil, I've used duck tape to seal out the water completely with no ill effects.
About the butter, I use a firm recipe (from the Cake Bible) that I can flip over and pat on a graham cracker/butter/brown sugar mixture for a crust. I've never tried baking a cheesecake with a crust, but I would assume if the foil keeps water out it'll keep butter in icon_smile.gif




Happy Birthday!

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luvsfreebies72 Posted 12 Apr 2009 , 5:05am
post #6 of 8

I make cheesecakes all the time. ( they are my fav dessert) I always use a springform pan. so easy-peasy. if you have seepage issues with the water getting in, do as pp suggested and double up the foil. I've never had that prob though, so I don't know why the water seeped in. If you had butter seep out, I would say decrease the butter in your crust recipe. Did you blind bake the crust first? If you get a crack, you can simply use a hot icing spatula to pull the top back into itself where the crack is. It will seal back up. Then decorate!

hellie0h Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 11:37am
post #7 of 8

I hate spring form pans for cheesecake because of the water bath problem. I found a video last year from the smartest man at Food Network, Alton Brown and since then only use a regular cake pan to bake cheesecake. Here is the link to the video, there are two parts.


kjgjam22 Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 2:06am
post #8 of 8

for my springform pans what i do is wrap the bottom of the pan in foil and then put the pan together. i also bake in a water bath. when i wrap the bottom of the pan in foil..even if some water gets inbetween the foil and the pan it doesnt seep into the crust. the other day i didnt bother to wrap the bottom in foil and boy did i have a soggy crust.. back to wrapping.

also a not about the spring form..they lose their spring. so what i do is take a set of pliers and bend back the betal where the handle is and its back to new.

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