How Did They Make These Cookies?

Baking By cindy58 Updated 14 Apr 2009 , 1:43pm by michellesArt

cindy58 Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 2:55pm
post #1 of 23

I think they're pretty cool looking!

http://www.gristmill.biz/images/easterCookies1.jpg

22 replies
Joybeth Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 3:03pm
post #2 of 23

I'm assuming it is royal icing, but I have NO idea how they did that...really neat. I have seen other posters like GeminiRJ who did tye dye cookies. Try asking them.

CookieMeister Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 4:27pm
post #3 of 23

It doesn't quite look like fondant, but you could do that effect (to a certain degree at least) with fondant.

Charmed Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 5:06pm
post #4 of 23

It looks like marbelling but how they do it????

bobwonderbuns Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 5:16pm
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joybeth

I'm assuming it is royal icing, but I have NO idea how they did that...really neat. I have seen other posters like GeminiRJ who did tye dye cookies. Try asking them.




Gemini did tye dye cookies too??? I haven't seen them!! (And here I thought I was the only one!!) icon_rolleyes.gificon_wink.gif

The easter cookies were done with marbled fondant. It's a pretty easy technique.

cricket0616 Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 5:23pm
post #7 of 23

I agree it is probably royal icing. I am wondering if they frosted the cookies with white royal icing and then dropped coloring onto the wet cookies and swirled it with toothpicks. (or something along those lines). I have used a similar method before and it the icing is loose enough it will allow you to swirl away without leaving any track marks.

julzs71 Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 5:27pm
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by cricket0616

I agree it is probably royal icing. I am wondering if they frosted the cookies with white royal icing and then dropped coloring onto the wet cookies and swirled it with toothpicks. (or something along those lines). I have used a similar method before and it the icing is loose enough it will allow you to swirl away without leaving any track marks.



ditto what cricket said.
It could have even been different colored royal icing.

cambo Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 5:33pm
post #9 of 23

Yes, I'm sure it's royal icing (or a glace-type icing) as you can see where it ran over the edges on the cookies. Very cool effect! I have done marbled cookies, but with rolled buttercream.

cindy58 Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 8:53pm
post #10 of 23

That link helps, charmed! I'm just finishing baking some cookies, I'll definitely try marbling some of the eggs tomorrow. Hope it works -- I really like the way those cookies look.

I wonder if using a fork to swirl the wet icing might work? More tines to track thru.

bakinccc Posted 10 Apr 2009 , 9:16pm
post #11 of 23

I bet they dropped different gel colors into one bowl of white icing, swirled them around a bit (with a fork is probably right cindy5icon_cool.gif then dipped the cookie upside down in it and turned it over to dry. That would look sooooo cool for a tye dye t-shirt cookie!!

cylstrial Posted 11 Apr 2009 , 1:10am
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakinccc

I bet they dropped different gel colors into one bowl of white icing, swirled them around a bit (with a fork is probably right cindy5icon_cool.gif then dipped the cookie upside down in it and turned it over to dry. That would look sooooo cool for a tye dye t-shirt cookie!!




That's a pretty good idea!

jen1977 Posted 11 Apr 2009 , 12:49pm
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakinccc

I bet they dropped different gel colors into one bowl of white icing, swirled them around a bit (with a fork is probably right cindy5icon_cool.gif then dipped the cookie upside down in it and turned it over to dry. That would look sooooo cool for a tye dye t-shirt cookie!!




I think you're right. I've seen that technique used on paper.

CAKEtankerous Posted 11 Apr 2009 , 1:25pm
post #14 of 23

I came across this site that shows marbelling. This might be at least the technique they used. Not sure if it's fondant or not on the cookies.
http://www.bakedecoratecelebrate.com/techniques/marbelizingfondant.cfm

cindy58 Posted 12 Apr 2009 , 2:06am
post #15 of 23

Here's our version -- I baked NFSC yesterday and my sister came over to decorate with me today. I used Toba's Glace' and used some Americolor gels and some CakeCraft paste colors that I dropped and swirled in, then dipped the cookies. It was fun -- quick and easy!
LL

bakinccc Posted 12 Apr 2009 , 5:52pm
post #16 of 23

Those are really, really cool cindy58...it looks like the technique worked very well for you!!! Thanks for posting the pictures. Did much of the icing run off the sides when you did it?

cylstrial Posted 12 Apr 2009 , 10:09pm
post #17 of 23

That is so cool Cindy!! Your cookies look great!

cindy58 Posted 12 Apr 2009 , 11:07pm
post #18 of 23

Thanks! The cookies were really fun to do and I've been thinking of other shapes and holidays to use this method. Like Valentine hearts and fall leaves -- there are many possibilities.

No, I didn't have any trouble with the icing running off the sides. Just dipped and gave them a little twist to cover well and lifted out. My Sis and I thought the icing might be even easier to work with if it were a tad thinner. We had 3 pie pans with various color combos going -- when we finished, we blended the icing in each pan well and came out with 2 good colors, peachy pink and robins egg blue. The 3rd pan was kind of grey. More color could then have been added/swirled to those colored bases to come up with new color schemes for more cookies. It reminds me of playing with paint in art class.

majka_ze Posted 13 Apr 2009 , 10:53am
post #19 of 23

You can make it another way: color your RI (thin flooding consistency). Flood with the base color - for example white, drop few drops with other colors on it. Take a toothpick and push the color in the white part.

Or you can drop wildly colored dots or lines over your cookie and with the toothpick move the colors in each other. I did it with my 4yo niece for this easter - one picture of similar technique is on the shirt in this cookie -
Image

If you wait a little, I will take photos of the "swirled" cookies my niece and I did.

It works best with very thin consistency (drop of RI will dissolve in the rest of RI on count of 3). You need the time for mixing the colors.

CAKEtankerous Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 2:18am
post #20 of 23

That's awesome. It looks like real marble. Really cool looking. I'll have to try that one of these days when I get better at the basics.

majka_ze Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 8:39am
post #21 of 23

Here is the promised picture where the colored RI was mixed with toothpick. It is not exactly the same - we went after different effect. But it can be done this way.

Or another possibility is to drop the toothpick in the color directly.
LL

cindy58 Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 11:16am
post #22 of 23

Your cookies are beautiful too, majka_ze. I also did some like those. You're starting your little niece off early decorating -- it can be lots of fun.

What I liked about the method I used was the random "surprise" look of each cookie when dipped. Also a quick way to produce a pretty cookie.

michellesArt Posted 14 Apr 2009 , 1:43pm
post #23 of 23

LOVE how the butterfly turned out (have some spring cookie bouquets to do and i might try this) thanks for the inspiration icon_smile.gif

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