Has Anyone Used Poured Fondant?

Decorating By Sweet-Kakes Updated 15 Apr 2009 , 2:08pm by TracyLH

Sweet-Kakes Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:21pm
post #1 of 17

I am thinking about using poured fondant on an upcoming wedding cake. I have never used the poured variety before, and I am wondering icon_rolleyes.gif Do you pour the fondant over buttercream? Do you do a crumbcoat first? Do you eliminate the bc altogether? I just dunno. If anyone can tell me how they do the poured fondant, I would be forever grateful! Thanks, my fellow cakers... thumbs_up.gif

16 replies
mbt4955 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:29pm
post #2 of 17

I've never seen poured fondant used on a full size cake. I use it on my petit fours and I know that people dip the tops of cupcakes in it, but I don't see how it would work for a wedding cake. Good luck and keep us posted.

Martha

Cakeonista Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:29pm
post #3 of 17

Poured fondant isn't really fondant at all, it's more of a glaze made with powdered sugar. You can pour it directly over your cake or mini cakes and it dries to a nice shiny semi-hard finish. HTH

SweetMelissa2007 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:33pm
post #4 of 17

I've used poured fondant before and you do use buttercream under it. I will say it is slightly finicky and regular fondant is more forgiving. You need to make sure there are NO bumps or blemishes because the poured fondant shows everything! Also, you need to let it sit without moving because it cracks very easily.

I made sure to make extra because the first time I did it I ran out before I covered the whole cake and you can't spread it to cover and then pouring more on messes it up. You can see in my photos the bear cake I did was poured fondant and I am going to upload my original practice poured fondant cake which is a football field from the Super Bowl (I think last year).

You should def practice with it before doing the actual wedding cake. One plus is I loved the taste. It is kind of sweet but I loved it!!

HTH, Melissa icon_lol.gif

fiddlesticks Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:34pm
post #5 of 17

mariu.. Do you have a recipe you can share ?
Thanks!

rockysmommy Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:38pm
post #6 of 17

Very Good...

"This is a great Fondant recipe that can be tinted with paste food color if desired. Pour over the top of cakes or petit fours to make a perfectly smooth and glossy surface. Excess fondant can be stored, tightly covered, in refrigerator for weeks. Reheat to use again. Recipe may be doubled or tripled.


Quick Pour Fondant Icing

PREP TIME    5 Min
COOK TIME    10 Min
READY IN    25 Min
Original recipe yield 4 cups - enough to cover 1- 10 inch cake

6 cups confectioners' sugar, sifted
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons light corn syrup
1 teaspoon almond extract

DIRECTIONS
In a saucepan, combine confectioners' sugar, water and corn syrup. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until it reaches a temperature of 92 degrees F (33 degrees C.) Mixture should be thin enough to pour, but thick enough to coat cake.
To cover cake: Frost cake smoothly with buttercream and place on a cooling rack with a cookie sheet underneath. Pour fondant over iced cake, flowing from center and moving out in a circular motion. Touch up sides with a spatula.

Cakeonista Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:43pm
post #7 of 17

There you go.........great recipe and it tastes a lot better than fondant and does look so pretty on cakes. You can also substitute lemon juice or lemon extract for the fondant. I usually use lemon, I love the flavor.

__Jamie__ Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:48pm
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetMelissa2007

You need to make sure there are NO bumps or blemishes because the poured fondant shows everything!




Yep....I've seen a few where poured fondant was used on a huge stacked cake...let's just say, it was like crumb city under there, every little bump and seam from the layers being torted...((shudder)). Cakewreck! thumbsdown.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetMelissa2007

You should def practice with it before doing the actual wedding cake. One plus is I loved the taste. It is kind of sweet but I loved it!!

HTH, Melissa




Practice practice! Poured fondant scares the be-geezus outta me. I tried it once...and I will again when I get brave enough! icon_biggrin.gif

iris711 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:51pm
post #9 of 17

I used poured fondant once on a 12" round cake, after it was dried I moved it and it crack in the middle, I improvised by adding flowers where it cracked and it came out beautiful. After that I have not used it again.

icon_rolleyes.gif

Sweet-Kakes Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:51pm
post #10 of 17

Ok, you all have made a believer out of me!! I'll go dig out my rolling pin, buy a few bags of marshmallows, and get to microwavin'. Not brave enough yet to try to poured thing! Thanks for all your help. Don't know what I would do without this site!

PinkZiab Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 8:52pm
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mariu

Poured fondant isn't really fondant at all, it's more of a glaze made with powdered sugar. You can pour it directly over your cake or mini cakes and it dries to a nice shiny semi-hard finish. HTH




Actually, authentic poured fondant is made by cooking sugar (sometimes with corn syrup added) to soft ball stage and then cooled to a precise temperature before recrystallizing it while agitating it so it winds up with a creamy smooth texture (you can actually do it in a food processor). The powdered sugar variety is known as "quick poured fondant" (or sometimes "faux poured fondant") and is--as the name suggests--a quick substitute, but doesn't behave exactly the same in all applications.

As others have stated, I wouldn't cover a whole cake in it (although you could, technically--it's been done). It's better suited for small desserts, pastries, and candymaking.

PinkZiab Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 9:02pm
post #12 of 17

Here's the recipe I have for food processor poured fondant (much easier than the traditional way and pretty much fool proof, as long as you have a good thermometer).

Food Processor Poured Fondant

2 1/2 cups - 17.5 ounces sugar
1/2 cup - 4 ounces water
1/4 cup - 3 ounces corn syrup
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1/4 teaspoon almond extract (optional)


Have you food processor fitted with the steel blade close to the stove.

In a medium size heavy saucepan combine the sugar, water and corn syrup, stir well (wash down any sugar residue from the side of the pan) and bring to a boil. Cook the sugar to soft ball stage (about 238°F). Immediately pour the fondant into the food processor.

Reinsert the thermometer into the sugar and allow to cool, uncovered, to exactly 140°F. This will take 25 to 35 minutes (but watch carefully as the temperature in the room can affect this drastically). Add optional flavoring and process for 2 to 3 minutes or until fondant becomes opaque.

Pour the fondant into a heatproof container, such as a 2 cup glass measure, lined with a small heavy duty plastic freezer bag. Close the bag without sealing. When completely cool and firm, expel the air, seal the bag, and lift out of container. Store at room temperature for at least 24 hours.

When needed, heat the fondant in a bowl over a pan of simmering water to NO MORE THAN 100°F (best to aim for the 96-98° range). If you overheat it it will taste fine, but it will dry with a dull, rather than shiny finish. Depending on the application, while heating, thin out the fondant with water or simple syrup in gradual additions until desired consistency is reached.

mbt4955 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 9:24pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

Here's the recipe I have for food processor poured fondant (much easier than the traditional way and pretty much fool proof, as long as you have a good thermometer).

Food Processor Poured Fondant




This is the recipe that I use too. I have found that I have to be very careful not to let it get too hot or the appearance really suffers.

fiddlesticks Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 9:24pm
post #14 of 17

Thanks for the recipes!
So is this the same poured fondant you can dip cupcakes in then ?
When do you add coloring ?
PinkZiab Is it P.S. in your recipe?
Can you tell I have never tried any poured fondant!

PinkZiab Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 11:00pm
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiddlesticks

Thanks for the recipes!
So is this the same poured fondant you can dip cupcakes in then ?
When do you add coloring ?
PinkZiab Is it P.S. in your recipe?
Can you tell I have never tried any poured fondant!




Yes you can dip cupcakes, glaze eclairs, petits four, cakes, etc, fill cherry cordials and other candies. This recipe uses GRANULATED sugar, NOT PS

fiddlesticks Posted 9 Apr 2009 , 12:07am
post #16 of 17

PinkZiab.. Thanks so much for the post!

TracyLH Posted 15 Apr 2009 , 2:08pm
post #17 of 17

Thanks everyone! I have been wanting to try petit fours and was getting ready to research the poured icing. Much appreciated! icon_smile.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%