Has Anyone Worked A Lot With Color Flow?

Decorating By angiev77 Updated 8 Apr 2009 , 5:48pm by DianeLM

angiev77 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 2:57pm
post #1 of 11

I am doing a margarita themed cake for a 21st birthday and have made margarita gllases and limes from color flow. they look pretty but just a little plain. does anyone know if you can paint or dust color flow? I thought about adding some pearl shimmer to them to make them a little bit more interesting but I didn't want to mess them up. Also, does anyone have any suggestions for reinforcing color flow pieces? I am going to "glue" sticks to the back of the glasses so they look as if they are standing up but I am REALLY worried they are going to break.

10 replies
shalderman Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:10pm
post #2 of 11

Yes you can paint them! I do this all the time - especially with pearl/luster dusts. Either dry or mixed with some clear vanilla extract or vodka.

I don't do anything more than what you mention when I stick them up in a cake. I just "glue" a cookie stick on (generally with white chocolate melts) and then stick it in once its hardened on. That's how I did the guitar cakes in my photos.

Just make sure they are GOOD and DRY before you try to handle them. Make them well in advance (as in more than 2-3 days...). Once they are solidly dry they hold up well - just handle with care icon_smile.gif

angiev77 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:14pm
post #3 of 11

So do you suggest just leaving them on the cakeboard/waxed paper until the last minute? I already broke one by picking it up and putting it in a plastic container. Maybe it wasn't dried through and through.

cakesbytanya Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:15pm
post #4 of 11

The edible food markers also work great on color flow. And I agree with attaching them with the melted chocolate. Chocolate will glue them better then RI.

cakesbytanya Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:17pm
post #5 of 11

Yes. I always leave mine dry on waxed paper. I don't usually pick them up until I'm ready to use them. One way to be sure they are dry is to make a test dot. Then if you can pick up the test dot and it is dry you will know for sure that the others are dry as well.

SLK Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:21pm
post #6 of 11

I do lots of color flow and dust/pain frequently. The key - as mentioned above- is to make sure they are completely dry. If you dust them dry you are fine, but if you use dust with vodka/lemon juice...anything wet, you'll need to let it dry really good first. And ALWAYS MAKE AN EXTRA or TWO!

Another option is to use gumpaste, I did this for a champaign glass once and painted it. It was sturdier than color flow.

Good luck.

DianeLM Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:24pm
post #7 of 11

Ditto what the others have said. You may want to experiment on your broken piece or the back of one of the good pieces. Pearl dust can really wash out the color. Sometimes a few well placed dots or swirls of luster is all you need to bring a dull piece to life, rather than painting over the whole thing.

In the future, use plastic cling wrap (Saran) instead of wax paper. MUCH safer and easier to remove the dry pieces. They literally fall right off!

shalderman - LOVE LOVE LOVE those guitar cakes and cupcakes! icon_smile.gif

tonedna Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:26pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by angiev77

So do you suggest just leaving them on the cakeboard/waxed paper until the last minute? I already broke one by picking it up and putting it in a plastic container. Maybe it wasn't dried through and through.




You need to let it dry for a few days... If you want it satnding you can use a skewer and put it in the piece before it dries. If your piece breaks even after is dry, maybe your colorflow was too thin. Sometimes you will
notice when it gets, translucent.
Another thing is making a dot on the side of the piece to see if it's dried before you try to move it.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

shalderman Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:57pm
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

Ditto what the others have said. You may want to experiment on your broken piece or the back of one of the good pieces. Pearl dust can really wash out the color. Sometimes a few well placed dots or swirls of luster is all you need to bring a dull piece to life, rather than painting over the whole thing.

In the future, use plastic cling wrap (Saran) instead of wax paper. MUCH safer and easier to remove the dry pieces. They literally fall right off!

shalderman - LOVE LOVE LOVE those guitar cakes and cupcakes! icon_smile.gif




Thanks! And thanks for that saran tip! I never would have thought to use that....very cool! icon_smile.gif

And ditto on making the extra blobs to test for dryness. And definitely make extras...it pains me to do that sometimes (I made two of those large harley logos for my harley cake out of colorflow...ugh what a pain!) but if you break it then your out of luck if you have extra.

SweetMelissa2007 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 5:43pm
post #10 of 11

When I use wax paper or parchment to dry color flow I notice the back part (which is lying on the wax paper) gets wrinkly or wavy. Anyone else have this happen or know how to fix. Sometimes I want to flip it over and use the back as the front and can't because of the waves.

DianeLM Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 5:48pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetMelissa2007

When I use wax paper or parchment to dry color flow I notice the back part (which is lying on the wax paper) gets wrinkly or wavy. Anyone else have this happen or know how to fix. Sometimes I want to flip it over and use the back as the front and can't because of the waves.




Use plastic cling wrap (Saran). Both sides will be nice and shiny with no wrinkling. And removing the pieces is a lot easier.

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