What Kind Of Fondant Do You Use? Help

Decorating By MamaNenascakes Updated 14 Jul 2009 , 8:54pm by MamaNenascakes

MamaNenascakes Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 1:00pm
post #1 of 5

Hello, this is my first time posting and I'm kind of new here. I was asking mysel some things... maybe you can help me.

1. I've been working with the regular fondant recipe (the one that uses glucouse, shortening, glicerin, gelatin...) for over 8 years and it's working great so far. I got the marshmallow fondant recipe just in 2007, well a couple of weeks ago I had to do an emergency cake and I didn't had my regular ingredients so I had to make the Marshmallow fondant... well guess what, it works fantstic, not to mention how less...much less expensive it is to make it.
My question is... do you see any difference? I flavor it, and taste fantastic! is there any disadvantage using it?

2. My second question is.... what does the baking soda in a cake? what if I add some baking soda to a recipe that doesn't call for baking soda?

Thank you all so much

4 replies
sgauta Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 1:11pm
post #2 of 5


In answer to your first question, I primarily use MMF and find no disadvantages to it. It tastes good, it's inexpensive, and it handles well. I guess if I HAD to pick something negative, it would be that it's messy to make, but I get a strange satisfaction out of watching something so messy and sticky turning into a smooth, perfect ball of fondant! I also flavor it per the recipe (using the Creme Royal too) and it smells and tastes great.

Baking soda is a leavening agent -- it basically reacts with air and moisture and forms gases that help your cake be light and soft (think of all those tiny 'holes' within it). I'm not sure what adding it to a recipe that doesn't call for it might do...I'm sure all the Alton Browns here can tell you! icon_biggrin.gif


AverageMom Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 1:21pm
post #3 of 5

I tried Wilton's fondant, but it tasted so bad I decided to make MMF. I'll never go back! I love that it is cheap, I can pick up the ingredients at my pitifully understocked grocery store, and if you take the time to add the sugar slowly it never fails. Plus, it tastes good!

PinkZiab Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 2:07pm
post #4 of 5

Baking soda is usually used as the sole leavening agent when there are acidic ingredients (buttermilk, lemon juice, vinegar). Baking powder (which is a combination of baking soda and cream of tartar--which itself is an acid) is used when there is no (or insufficient) presence of acid elsewhere in the recipe. Sometimes both are used when additional leavening is needed.

Baking recipes (or formulas) are very carefully planned out for measurements and proportions, and especially when it comes to leavening, just throwing in something that isn't called for (unless you have good reason and are knowledgeable enough to know the amount and other substitutions that need to be made) is going to ruin your recipe.

MamaNenascakes Posted 14 Jul 2009 , 8:54pm
post #5 of 5

thank yu for your responses

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