Is There A Trick To Keep Dried Fondant Accents From Breaking

Decorating By AKA_cupcakeshoppe Updated 7 Apr 2009 , 7:33pm by sadsmile

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 6:45am
post #1 of 8

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The petals are breaking off in some of my daisies. Is there such a thing as too dry when it comes to fondant accents? Mine are pretty dry because they're in an airconditioned room, no humidity but i wonder if i take them out of the room if they'll go soft again.

TIA!

7 replies
ceshell Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 8:05am
post #2 of 8

I think if you want them to get nice and hard and dry, but they are thin enough to be fragile, you should make them out of gumpaste or 50/50 fondant/gumpaste. Fondant is brittle and crumbly when it dries. Gumpaste is much sturdier, that's why it's used so often for flowers! I only use fondant for flowers if a) they are meant to stay 2D (but even some I did tonight broke) and even then I usually keep them in a sealed container to keep them soft til they go on the cake.

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 8:51am
post #3 of 8

ohhhhhhhh okay... so you just keep them soft? how do you handle them? i find it hard to handle them when they're soft icon_sad.gif and i used fondant for accents because I wanted to try adding WC to MFF and it tastes awesome and because i want people to be able to eat the flowers (they're soooooooo yummy. i've been eating the broken ones. lol)

ceshell Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 11:57pm
post #4 of 8

The answer to how you handle them is...veeerrrrrrrry carefully! icon_smile.gif For flowers, it's definitely maddening; I mean, they just want to break if you are rolling the fondant thin enough to look nice for flowers. Or if you keep them soft, then they want to stick to everything so you risk the petals pulling away or flopping around. It is surely easier to keep fondant deco's soft if you are using thicker decorations, but IMO they don't look as nice for flowers, unless "chunky" is part of your design scheme. For handling I do find that lifting them with an icing spatula helps a LOT. If they're still soft, you will want to place them on something dusted with cornstarch or PS to prevent sticking, and you may want to dust your spatula too.

I used the tiny daisy cutter last night and let them air-harden...I definitely lost petals on 3 out of 8 flowers icon_rolleyes.gif...that loss was because I was trying to put some on the cake sides so of course you have to handle the petals. I suppose the real solution is: make extra to account for breakage. icon_razz.gif

xstitcher Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 5:12am
post #5 of 8

What Ceshell said and I'd also not do them so far in advance so they don't have as much time to dry out.

calicopurr Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 7:19pm
post #6 of 8

I'm making a buttercream cake for Easter and I want it to crust.
I have made some 3D fondant and tylose flowers. What do I use
to glue these to the sides of my crusted cake? There is less surface
area because the flowers are cupped. thx icon_smile.gif

aswartzw Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 7:30pm
post #7 of 8

50/50 is so nice (I use MMF/wilton gumpaste). I make flowers with that and they dont' break nearly as easily. Just gumpaste and they will fracture at the slightest hit. I don't normally have issues with fondant that much but it could just be the MMF. Have you tried other fondants?

To stick them on a BC cake, you can use a dab of BC or RI.

sadsmile Posted 7 Apr 2009 , 7:33pm
post #8 of 8

You could also try rolling around the center of where your cut out will be to thin the edges but leave it thicker in the middle/center of the flower for more support. That is a lot of extra rolling for each flower but you can't really frill daisy petals for realness.

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