Cake Mix Expiration Dates

Decorating By vfischer Updated 9 Apr 2009 , 3:04pm by Shom

vfischer Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:06pm
post #1 of 8

Has anyone had any experience with baking from a cake mix that has an expiration date on it that has already expired? I found that I have 5 cake mixes that expired the end of last year. I was wondering if anyone had any advice.

7 replies
terrier Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:15pm
post #2 of 8

I just got this email... it might help!


A student at HBHS (high school) had pancakes this week and it almost became fatal. His Mom (registered nurse) made him pancakes, dropped him off at school and headed to play tennis. She never takes her cell phone on the court but did this time and her son called to say he was having trouble breathing. She told him to go to the nurse immediately and proceeded to call school and alert the nurse. The nurse called the paramedics and they were there in 3 minutes and worked on the boy all the way to the hospital. He came so close to dying. Evidently this is more common then I ever knew. Check the expiration dates on packages like pancakes and cake mixes that have yeast which over time develop spores. Apparently, the mold that forms in old mixes can be toxic! Throw away ALL OUTDATED pancake mix, Bisquick, brownie mixes, cake mixes etc you have in your home.

You can check this website....... http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/pancake.asp

ashea Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:24pm
post #3 of 8

I would not use the expired cake mix, it could be very fatal.

tripleD Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:33pm
post #4 of 8

like they say when in doubt throw it out.

Think about it, is it worth getting sick over.

7yyrt Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 6:07pm
post #5 of 8

If you have an allergy to mold, dump it.
If it smells funny, dump it.
If you're worried, dump it.
We eat it - no one here has allergies.

From the link:
It needs be kept in mind there is nothing inherently toxic about pancake mix that has passed its freshness date, the product's getting old does not transform it into a poison, nor does the growth of mold within opened boxes of flapjack powder turn it into something that will fell all who ingest it. Only those who have allergies to mold are at risk, and even then, for the pancake mix to pose a hazard it has to contain mold spores, not just be over the hill.

For mold to gain access to a food product, the foodstuff has to be exposed to its spores. Pancake mix cocooned in an unbleached wax paper, plastic, or a foil pouch within its outer packaging wouldn't have this contact and should still be safe no matter how old it gets. However, mix sold unpouched in cardboard boxes or paper sacks would likely be at risk even if the box or sack hadn't previously been opened, because such packaging would not necessarily keep dampness out, and mold thrives in damp environments.

What does all this mean? If you don't have a mold allergy, you needn't fear your pancake mix; if you do have such a sensitivity, you shouldn't keep your flapjack makings around for a few years after opening the box or pouch it came in. It's not worth dying over 50¢ worth of pancake mix, so when in doubt, throw it out.

terrier Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 8:31pm
post #6 of 8

But if you are making cakes for other people...BUMP IT! You have no idea who was allergies... if you are making it for you and you are fine with eating it then that is up to you.

muddpuppy Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 7:43pm
post #7 of 8

I thought I would definately consider using it...then I thought they put expiration dates for a reason.. I don't know if I'd risk it.. icon_smile.gif

Shom Posted 9 Apr 2009 , 3:04pm
post #8 of 8

I was just wondering what about chocolate? I have some baker's chocolate which expired in Feb do u think I can still use it?

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